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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Speed up the Kernel srlinuxx 01/01/2013 - 12:48am
Story Haiku: BeOS for the 21st Century srlinuxx 01/01/2013 - 12:41am
Story Five Linux predictions for 2013 srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 10:20pm
Story Mozilla Firefox in 2012 srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 7:18pm
Story Aakash 3 May Feature SIM Slot, Linux Support srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 7:16pm
Story Five Biggest Open Source Developments in 2012 srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 7:13pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 5:28am
Story Dual boot with two Linux distributions srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 2:40am
Story The Problems Right Now For Gaming On Linux srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 2:35am
Story What on Earth is Gnome OS? srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 2:30am

some leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Debian GNU Linux SuiteTelecentro

  • Chapter 1: A brief introduction to the GNU Autotools
  • Linux Outlaws 37
  • Returning to Hardy
  • Irish Open Source Technology Conference 2008
  • Five reasons why Linux sucks
  • Nexuiz 2.4.2 Open-Source FPS Released
  • Protect Yourself From The Torrent Police With IPlist and IPblock

You Can Hack An OS But You Can't Hack People (3 & 4)

Filed under
Linux

penguinpetes.com: Now, the three computing republics, Unix, Apple, and Windows, had different approaches to autonomy. In Unix, they teetered cheerfully on the edge of anarchy. There was only very little attempt to reign in the free spirits there. In Windows, no stepping out of line was tolerated, but it was necessary to maintain perfect order and the people there loved it. In Apple, however, there was a balance: things were "officially" controlled.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Debian / Ubuntu Package post-removal Troubleshooting

  • Bash Shell Loop Over Set of Files
  • How to convert text files to all upper or lower case
  • String Variables In Bash, Perl, C and Awk on Linux or Unix - Porting
  • Podcast 23 Gentoo 2008 Slackware 12.1 Install

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #90

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 90 for the weeks May 4th - May 10th, 2008 is now available. In this issue we cover: Ubuntu Brainstorm Growing, Ubuntu Featured on Italian TV, submit questions for Launchpad podcast, Forums News and Interviews, Ubuntu UK Podcast Episode 5, and much more.

Debian Weekly News - May 9th, 2008

Filed under
Linux

debian.org: Welcome to this year's 2nd issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. While visiting Stefano Zacchiroli the www 2008 conference in china Sir Tim Berners-Lee offered Debian kudos for its well thought-out encapsulation/packaging of libraries. Paul Wise will close his Debian user and Debian new contributor surveys on June 1st so that analysis of the results can begin.

Python with a modular IDE (Vim)

Filed under
Software

blog.sontek.net: On Thursday, May 9th, 2008 the Utah Python User Group decided to settle the debate that has plagued us developers since the beginning of time: If you were a programming language, what editor would you use?

Grandmom’s guide to Ubuntu: Hardy Heron ate my mp3’s

Filed under
Ubuntu

bloggernews.net: Well, it’s time to update the Linux. The latest update is Hardy Heron. Computer people like cute names, and each Linux/ubuntu update has an animal name to identify it. Hardy Heron, gutsy Gibbon, etc.

Replacing Nautilus with quicker and faster PCMan File Manager in Ubuntu 8.04

Filed under
Software

linuxondesktop.blogspot: In this article i discuss PCMan File Manger which is a lightweight alternative to nautilus and how to set various menus in Ubuntu to using PCMan File manager instead of using nautilus.

Why we love Ubuntu Linux (or maybe we don't)

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: With Ubuntu 8.04 now on the streets, it’s time to catch a breather and reflect on just why Ubuntu gets all the hype. Why is Ubuntu the hottest brand in Linuxdom at this time? Why is it the distro most frequently advocated? I posed these questions to readers and LUG members; here’s the feedback from real-life Linux users.

What's in a Color?

Filed under
Ubuntu

on-being-open.blogspot: I just read an interesting post over at Linux.com by someone named Susan Linton. Titled "Review: Hardy Heron converts an Ubuntu skeptic", the article has some interesting things to add to the discussion about Linux's readiness to be ones only desktop operating system. But in one case it left me feeling rather ... well... cold I guess.

VirtualBox

Filed under
Software

meandubuntu.wordpress: In my continuing quest to both try new things in general, and try new things that will help me be more productive, I recently set up VirtualBox.

How Microsoft Uses Open Against Open

Filed under
Microsoft

opendotdotdot.blogspot: To my shame, Peter Murray-Rust put up a reply to my post below in just a few hours. It shows that even such a key defender of openness as Peter finds he "needs an MS OS on my machine because it makes it easier to use tools such as LiveMeeting.

OOXML outreach to Blender

Filed under
OSS

groklaw: Microsoft has just approached the Blender guys, and I would assume have or will approach other FOSS projects since we learn that Microsoft has assigned a guy to work with Open Source projects, with a request for information on how to make Blender run better on Windows.

AbiWord - an Alternative Word Processor

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: OpenOffice.org is generally considered the flagship of productivity programs in the open source world, but it’s not the only choice. I’ve looked at alternative word processor AbiWord previously, in a round-up of many different alternatives to OOo, but today I want to look at it in a lot more detail.

openSUSE 11.0: Qt Package Manager Improvements

Filed under
SUSE

kdedevelopers.org: Just want to point out four improvements of the YaST Qt package selector in the upcoming openSUSE 11.0 that were missing too long, much requested (at least by me) and now added:

Interview with C.S. Lee, creator of HeX

Filed under
Interviews

securitydistro.com: As the SecurityDistro team adds live security distributions to our list, we like to take things one step further and get to know the developers behind the distribution. This gives us insight into what they see coming in the months ahead and a little information on themselves.

Torrent Applications On Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

dhruvasagar.com: I have now mostly moved to Ubuntu, today I will elaborate and discuss a bit on my experience of the transition from Windows to Ubuntu and I’ll be targeting Torrent Applications specifically.

Ubuntu in Vermist

Filed under
Ubuntu

n00.be: In today’s episode of spot the operating system we present to you the Belgian movie Vermist where police detectives apparently use Ubuntu as their operating system of choice.

Compiz Fusion On Mandriva One 2008.1 Spring (GNOME/NVIDIA)

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

This document describes how to enable and configure Compiz Fusion on a Mandriva One 2008.1 Spring GNOME desktop with an NVIDIA graphics card.

A Word in Your Ear

Filed under
OSS

opendotdotdot.blogspot: A little while back I gave Peter Murray-Rust a hard time for daring to suggest that OOXML might be acceptable for archiving purposes. There are two issues here.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more