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Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Has SourceForge been judged unfairly? Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2013 - 10:18pm
Story Linux-fueled networked DVR adds second tuner Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2013 - 10:11pm
Story Is it legal to sell GPL software? Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2013 - 9:49pm
Story Richard Stallman decides Emacs should go WYSIWYG Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2013 - 9:38pm
Story openSUSE 13.1 vs Ubuntu 13.10: a friendly match Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2013 - 9:03pm
Story Turning Mozilla Thunderbird into a Phoenix Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2013 - 6:23pm
Story Today in Techrights (on Microsoft) Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2013 - 5:28pm
Story MATE to make it into Debian repositories Rianne Schestowitz 22/11/2013 - 3:24am
Story Ubuntu for phones and tablets Rianne Schestowitz 22/11/2013 - 3:04am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 7:40pm

Banshee 1.2 - 1.x Series Getting to Maturity

Filed under
Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: The new Banshee 1.2 includes several new features over the last stable release, like the equaliser or the music recommendations panel. The full list of new or improved features is here. For those who didn't hear about Banshee yet, it's a pretty powerful audio player for GNOME which received more and more attention lately.

7 Best Linux Distributions for Multimedia Enthusiasts

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Graphic designers, movie editors, music composers, and multimedia addicts have specific needs when it comes to software. That is why there are specialized Linux distributions that cater to them. Here are 7.

15 Examples To Master Linux Command Line History

Filed under
HowTos

thegeekstuff.com: When you are using Linux command line frequently, using the history effectively can be a major productivity boost. In fact, once you have mastered the 15 examples that I’ve provided here, you’ll find using command line more enjoyable and fun.

images, pictures, screenshots, & graphs

Filed under
Linux
  • 10 Reasons why GUI Doesn’t Matter

  • 5 + 1 beautiful designs for Ubuntu 8.10 “Intrepid Ibex”
  • Make OpenOffice Work For You : Starting Out
  • 1000+ Desktop Wallpapers for your Asus Eee PC
  • Social network popularity around the world
  • Dell Says Ubuntu Comes With “No Security”

Ubuntu netbook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

manilastandardtoday.com: ACER’s Aspire One is a solid netbook, but it can be much more. In the last two weeks, I’ve been using it as a full notebook, running office applications, editing digital photos, surfing the Web and watching videos on a robust, full-featured system.

openSUSE @ Akademy 2008

Filed under
SUSE

lizards.opensuse: In Sint-Katelijne-Waver, Belgium currently Akademy, the annual conference of the KDE project takes place. More than 300 people had a nice weekend listening to a whole bunch of very interesting talks of various topics around KDE. Over the week there will be special topics and BOFs and Hacking.

Byebye Ubuntu, Hello Fedora

Filed under
Linux

gibbalog.blogspot: My recent experiments with installing Ubuntu on my little home server came to an end this weekend. After finding tons of forum posts and various problems with installing SqueezeCenter on Hardy Heron I decided to try another approach.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux Myth: Installing “Third Party” Software is “Hard”

  • Red Hat Solutions Provide Reliability and Performance Gains for Munich Airport
  • Debian Bug Count Rising
  • Marble provides basic engine for free Google Earth replacement
  • Did the big boys really kill OLPC?
  • When happened this to GNOME?
  • openSUSE vanilla kernel part 2….
  • Vote on the OpenOffice.org 3.0 splash screen
  • Running Ubuntu on an Asus EEE 4G
  • Hadoop: When grownups do open source
  • Linux rises to top dog in servers
  • Why Ubuntu just might succeed
  • Linus Torvalds & the Woodshed
  • What the heck is Mozilla thinking?
  • KDE-PIM Hackers Present Integration of KDE 4 Frameworks
  • GPL Project Watch List for Week of 08/08
  • 12 great apps for bridging Windows, Linux and Macs
  • Recovering Deleted Files By Inode Number In Linux And Unix
  • There and back again: a narrative of OSCON 2008
  • Open Source Software Gaining Ground
  • Linux Application Checker Brings Distro Help

Hiding Software Versions - A Step Forward to a Secure Server

Filed under
HowTos

Howto change the default behavior of showing the software version for some popular packages on Ubuntu 8.04.1 Server, such as Postfix, Apache, PHP, and VSFTPD.

CentOS 5.2 - Send in the Clones

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: CentOS, for those unfamiliar, is a clone distribution. The maintainers take the freely-available source code released by Redhat for its commercial Redhat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) product and recompile it, stripping out any trademarked artwork, then redistribute it as CentOS.

Dell shipping five Hardy Heron systems

Filed under
Ubuntu

desktoplinux.com: Dell is shipping two new laptops with widescreen LCD displays and Ubuntu Hardy Heron (8.04) operating systems with DVD playback. Additionally, the largest U.S. PC maker has started offering Hardy Heron on three models previously available with the earlier Gutsy Gibbon Ubuntu release.

Mandriva 2009 Beta 2 - KDE 4.1 thoughts and comments

Filed under
MDV

blog.linuxbox.co.nz: I recently downloaded the Mandriva 2009.0 beta 2 KDE 4.1 live cd. I kept of list of things I found as I had a look around it. I only focused on the desktop.

Top 4 Alternatives to Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Linux

intranetjournal.com: Considering the success of Ubuntu Linux as a distribution of the open source operating system, it has become clear that locating good alternatives to this release is becoming increasingly difficult. With that said, I've decided to round up the best candidates.

Zenwalk 5.2 GNOME Edition (beta)

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: Finally. Since 1995, when Patrick Volkerding announced that he would no longer include GNOME in Slackware, people had to rely on projects like GWARE, GNOME Slackbuild or Dropline to enjoy their favourite desktop environment on the oldest Linux distribution around. Until now.

Debian: The OS for the rest of us

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Lately I have been poking at various Linux distributions to see what they have to offer. But most of the distributions I have looked at are geared toward new users, users with older (or strange) hardware, or corporate users. But what about those that do not fall into any of the above? What about those Linux users who want a challenge? Something that doesn’t hand-hold you through the entire computing experience? Well, you’re in luck.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Bash & (Ampersand)

  • Accessing Ubuntu files after reformatting Windows
  • Add Computer Network And Trash Icons To Desktop
  • Creating global keyboard shortcuts in GNOME
  • Bash Trap Control C
  • How to Install aMSN 0.98b with anti-aliasing in Ubuntu
  • Recover plesk access
  • Puppet can ease system administration tasks across the network
  • Floating Point Math in Bash, Part 2 (Wait for System Load)
  • Linux Guides (Must Read)

My disagreement with Richard Stallman

Filed under
OSS

geekzone.co.nz: Software and computers are all pervasive in today's world and thus demand our utmost diligence: The lives we live are run and organised by software, we depend on software, we trust our most intimate data to software systems. Thus, the importance of free software: Only free software can protect our freedoms.

The Linux desktop, Mac OS X, and barking dogs

Filed under
Linux

news.cnet.com: There are, of course, the constant reports of how easy Linux is to install and use on the desktop. Then there are the more pragmatic posts like this one from Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols calling out a few things Linux needs to succeed on the desktop, despite its otherwise strong credentials. And yet the dog isn't barking. Few are buying. Why?

OpenGL 3.0 released

Filed under
Software

liquidat.wordpress: The Khronos Group has released a new mile stone version of the OpenGL API: version 3.0, codename Long Peaks. While this is really good news, Khronos is still unable to communicate with the community.

Reimagining The Desktop

Filed under
KDE
Linux
MDV

Here is an interesting discussion of the changes KDE 4 (via Mandriva Linux 2009 pre-releases) brings to desktop interaction. It's a very comprehensive and thoughtful discussion and explanation of the new features KDE 4 introduces and what they mean for how you interact with your desktop. If you're not sure how to go about using KDE 4 to its full potential, read it!

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More in Tux Machines

How Google Does Open Source

Marc Merlin has been working as an engineer at Google since 2002 and has seen (and done) a lot of open source and Linux work during that time. Speaking at the LinuxCon North America event this week, Merlin provided a standing room only audience with an overview how Google uses and contributes to open source. "Google wouldn't be around today without open source software," Merlin said. Read more

High-end music player has a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian inside

Bryston has launched a high-end, compact “BDP-π” digital music player built on a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian, plus a HifiBerry “Digi+” audio HAT add-on. Bryston’s new Raspberry Pi-based BDP-π digital music player costs a hefty $1,295. Yet that’s less than half the cost of the highly acclaimed Bryston BDP-2 player, while offering many of these same features and much of the same high-end sound quality. The BDP-π is faster and more capable than the BDP-1, says the company. Read more

Leftovers: Gaming (Mighty No. 9 and Wine)

  • “Mighty No. 9” Mac & Linux Versions Released on Steam
    The creators of the Kickstarter-funded video game, Mighty No. 9, announced on Thursday they released the Mac and Linux versions of the game. This announcement comes just a little over two months after the game was delivered to North American and Asian backers via PS4, Xbox One, and PC. The team revealed that both Mac and Linux versions are now available on Steam.
  • Mac and Linux Versions of Mighty No. 9 Released
  • The Wine Stable Release 1.8.4 Is Now Available
    The Wine team released today fifth stable release of 1.8 branch of Wine. Version 1.8.4 has many small changes including 50 bugfixes. This stable release contains bugfixes, new cards were added to GPU description table, new features are included in development releases from 1.9 branch.

Android Leftovers

  • iPhones are much more likely to 'fail' than Androids
    Apple's once glittering reputation for quality took quite a few hits during the last few years, especially when it comes to iOS, the software that runs on iPhones. In some cases, recurrent software bugs have plagued users with issues such as the inability to use Wi-Fi, frequent crashes, and ridiculously short battery life. This week reports surfaced about a hardware flaw that makes some iPhone 6 screens inoperable. (Apple hasn't confirmed any related problems.) It's hard to tell how widespread some of these issues are, but a new report from a company that monitors smartphone quality suggests iPhones are far more likely to "fail" or suffer serious glitches than Android phones. The Blancco Technology Group says it collected performance data from millions of mobile phones during the second quarter of 2016, and it found that iPhones had an overall failure rate of 58 percent, compared to just 35 percent failure for Android devices. The term "failure" doesn’t necessarily mean that the phone has become a brick, according to Blancco. Instead, it means the device or software running on the device suffered some serious problem.
  • Maru OS is now open source (Turns Android phones into Linux desktops)
    Maru OS is a software project that lets you plug an Android phone into an external display to run desktop Linux software. First unveiled earlier this year, the software is very much a work-in-progress. Initially it only supported one phone: the Google Nexus 5. But things could get a lot more interesting soon, because the developer behind Maru OS has finished open sourcing the project and a group of developers are planning to start porting the software to run on additional devices.
  • Maru OS wants to turn your phone into a desktop with its latest open source build
    Not to be confused with Maru the adorable YouTube cat, Maru OS, the bite-sized Android add-on that turns your phone into a desktop, just went open source. Maru OS doesn’t change much about the way your phone operates on its own, but once you connect a desktop monitor via a slimport cable, Maru really comes to life. When connected to a display, Maru OS allows you to run a desktop Linux environment straight from your phone. Your phone is still a phone, it’ll take calls, send texts and do everything else it normally does, even while it’s connected to a desktop monitor running Linux on the side. It’s an interesting concept, but it’s still very much a work in progress. Today’s announcement could help move things along for Maru.