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Thursday, 23 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Living With GNOME's NetworkManager

Filed under
Software

enterprisenetworkingplanet.com: Pain-free networking is the promise that the NetworkManager project makes. This week we will introduce NetworkManager and its features (and drawbacks).

Here comes summer's first Linux netbook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computerworld.com: Reports of the Linux netbook's death at the hands of Microsoft have been greatly exaggerated. A flood of Linux netbook news will be made next week at the Computex trade show in Taiwan.

8 Great Linux Apps Worth Bragging About, part 2

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Last week we took a look at four great Linux/FOSS applications that are as good as any of their competitors, FOSS or proprietary. Today I'll wrap up with four more.

Preston Gralla: Why you Shouldn’t Care

dthomasdigital.wordpress: In this weeks Computerworld opinion column “Desktop Linux: Why you Shouln’t Care” Preston Gralla (who?) bashes Linux for no apparent reason other than to bash something he obviously knows nothing about.

9 reasons to switch from Windows to Linux

Filed under
Linux

tech-no-media.com: I will list 9 of the most common reasons to switch from Windows to Linux and try to explain in which cases the switch to Linux has a good chance of delivering the expected benefits.

Specto: Get Instant Notifications In Your Linux Machine

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: If you want to monitor a blog for new article update, a great way is to subscribe to its RSS feed and get notified instantly when it updates its content. What if you want to monitor more than just a blog?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Xorg, keyboard and mice

  • Introduction to fstab
  • Building KXEN Models on Ubuntu
  • Make X.Org pretty with DRI2 and UXA
  • How to stop Ubuntu from asking for your sudo password
  • Command line currency conversion
  • Setting up a Linux-based Open-Mesh Network, Part 1
  • Debian Public Keys Error

some shorts:

Filed under
Linux
  • Slackware Changes Package Compression Format

  • openSUSE changes to -fomit-frame-pointer -mtune=generic
  • Linpus To Launch Moblin V2 OS Next Week

The Lean green eco-friendly Linux machine

Filed under
Linux

Learn how the GNU/Linux is becoming more eco-friendly

Reviewed: Yoggie Open Firewall SOHO

Filed under
Hardware

tuxradar.com: Here's a device that started out as a firewall and ended up as a powerful embedded development platform. It's based around an ARM CPU and includes an SDK to let you develop your own tools.

Where does Linux fit in the business desktop?

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: First off, just what is the business desktop? Who uses it? Who are the mystery 'power users' in a business environment that don't use the same tools to do their job that every one in the company uses?

openSUSE Ambassadors Program

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Want to help spread the word about the openSUSE Project and encourage more people to become part of the openSUSE Community? Are you ready to roll up your sleeves and spread the word about the openSUSE Project?

5 Best Pen-Test Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: Linux distributions are often customized to perform many specialized tasks cater to a particular industry, hobby or business. Today we will take a look at some of best Pen-test distributions out there.

Open source virtualisation - worth the wait

tectonic.co.za: Open source may have had a late start in the realm of enterprise virtualisation, but the meticulous and attentive development of this technology has led to better products in the long run. Not only is open source virtualisation now fully enterprise-ready, but it offers greater cost-savings and more flexibility that its proprietary counterparts.

OMG! I’m using a non-Debian Linux distro!

Filed under
Linux

jwjones.wordpress: Over the long Memorial Day weekend I decided to do some further Linux distro-hopping, and so wiped out my beloved Crunchbang Linux to test the following distros:

Has ASUS all but given up on Linux?

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com.au: At today's ASUS product showcase in Sydney the entire range was there, from ultra-portable, touch screen netbooks to high-end, quad core Lamborghinis (I'm not joking). Even Windows Vista was there. There was only one thing missing - Linux.

Getting real about Linux on the desktop

Filed under
Linux

channelregister.co.uk: Few topics in the IT industry are more contentious than the prospect of putting Linux on the corporate desktop. Opinions range from the religious view at one end, promoting a fundamentalist belief in open source as the saviour of mankind, to the reaction of corporate conservatives at the other, dismissing Linux as irrelevant to serious end user computing.

Striking the Right Gnote

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: You might imagine that an application for desktop notes would be too commonplace to generate controversy. Yet when Hubert Figuiere created Gnote, a port of the GNOME application Tomboy to C++, controversy erupted immediately.

Is Linux finally ready for the Desktop takeover?

Filed under
Linux

awardspace.com: Everyone with even a minor experience in computers knows what Linux is. It is a remarkably complete operating system and is one of the most prominent examples of free software and open source development.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.