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Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Linux Setup - Graham Morrison, Linux Voice Roy Schestowitz 06/03/2014 - 10:50pm
Story Our Assignment Roy Schestowitz 06/03/2014 - 10:48pm
Story Video Acceleration Takes The Backseat On Chrome For Linux Roy Schestowitz 06/03/2014 - 10:45pm
Story GnuTLS: Big internal bugs, few real-world problems Rianne Schestowitz 06/03/2014 - 10:33pm
Story Calligra 2.8 Released Roy Schestowitz 06/03/2014 - 10:31pm
Story Totally Legal Computer Roy Schestowitz 06/03/2014 - 5:25pm
Story 3D Printing's Next Revolution: Linux Roy Schestowitz 06/03/2014 - 5:21pm
Story Ubuntu is the most used OS for production OpenStack deployments Roy Schestowitz 06/03/2014 - 5:19pm
Story Packaged Linux Delivers Network Functions Virtualization Roy Schestowitz 06/03/2014 - 5:18pm
Story Popcorn Time lets you stream torrent movies on your Linux desktop Roy Schestowitz 06/03/2014 - 5:15pm

A Better File System for Linux?

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Linux At the heart of every operating system is the file system that provides read/write access to data. Since 2001, Ext3 has been the mainstay of Linux file systems. But the winds of change could be blowing toward a better file system in the works.

Hugin panoramic photo editor extends its reach

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Software The developers of the free panoramic photo editor Hugin released version 0.7 this month, culminating a two-year development cycle. The new release incorporates key new technical abilities and usability improvements to help demystify the panorama creation process for the average shooter.

Ubuntu: And Heeeerre We Go

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  • Official Ubuntu Release Announcement

  • The LXF Test: Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex)
  • Ubuntu 8.10 - A Positive Evolution
  • Ubuntu 8.10 First Tryout
  • Ubuntu 8.10: Good, but underwhelming
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Arrives, Bringing More User-Friendly Features
  • Notes on notes on Ibex
  • Intrepid Ibex - Installation Tips
  • Tips for a better Ubuntu download
  • (Intrepid) Watch out for this bug..

Dreamlinux - Review & Tutorial

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Linux I've heard of Dreamlinux from fellow members at one of the forums I frequent. They said it was beautiful, they said it was easy. So I figured, I had to try it.

Review of Puppy Linux

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helpforlinux.blogspot: Just out of curiosity I downloaded Puppy Linux and gave it a try. Now both Puppy and Damn Small Linux are petits, however I decided to give Puppy a go because it has few essential things like Java and flash pre-installed. It also comes with proprietary media codecs.

Mark Shuttleworth: Ibex design

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Ubuntu With Intrepid on track to hit the wires today I thought I’d blog a little on the process we followed in designing the new user switcher, presence manager and session management experience, and lessons learned along the way.

OpenOffice is a worthy alternative

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OOo The final version of 3, the open source competitor to Micro-soft Office, came out two weeks ago and looks better than ever.

Opera 9.62 Released

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Software We released 9.62 today, which addresses some security issues. This release is a recommended upgrade for all those running the latest stable releases.

Xfce 4.4.3 released

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Software Just because we're gearing up to release 4.6.0, it doesn't mean we've forgotten the 4.4 branch. A bunch of bug fixes had accumulated since 4.4.2, so we have a new release for you.

Automatic And Up-To-Date Fedora 9 Installations With Kickstart And Novi

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Kickstart allows you to do automatic Fedora/RedHat/CentOS installations. This is useful and time-saving if you have to deploy tens or hundreds of similar systems (e.g. workstations). Kickstart reads the installation settings from a Kickstart configuration file.

today's leftovers

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  • Novell Turns Linux Desktop Setback Into Victory

  • Microsoft mugs old folks homes Down Under
  • 12 great apps for bridging Windows, Linux and Macs
  • Kubuntu Intrepid and Desktop Notifications
  • XFCE 4.4.3, distros, stuff: angry morning
  • OpenOffice 2.4.2 fixes critical vulnerabilities
  • ApacheCon US 2008 Keynote Speakers Announced
  • Red Hat Video: Spotlight on PackageKit
  • Drupal wins 2008 Best PHP Open Source CMS Award
  • EC to publish open source procurement guidelines
  • Wow! Windows 7 UI preview - Double YAWN…. zzzz
  • Linux Is Less Annoying Than Windows 7
  • Tools for creating TCP/IP packets
  • Linux Outlaws 61 - Bono Jacon, You've Got Mail!
  • Linus' Blog: Penguins on Parade

some howtos:

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  • How to Create A Minimal And Beautiful Desktop With Conky

  • Making a Local Copy of openSUSE Repository (Mirror Server)
  • How to fix your Windows MBR with an Ubuntu liveCD
  • Use BitTorrent to Upgrade to Ubuntu ‘Intrepid Ibex’
  • Convert .BIN/.CUE files to .ISO/.CDR/.WAV files using bchunk
  • Renaming a Logical Volume (how to rename)
  • The Ubuntu Upgrade Guide
  • More tricks with BashDiff
  • Secrets for controlling VirtualBox from the command line
  • VirtualBox Guest Additions, the Gentoo Way
  • Network traffic & bandwidth monitoring with darkstat on Gentoo
  • How to compile a custom kernel for Ubuntu Intrepid
  • How To Fix Virtualbox After Upgrading Ubuntu

Landscape 1.2 Released with More Customizable Features

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Ubuntu We have just released Landscape 1.2 which is the next version of our management and monitoring software that lets you manage multiple Ubuntu systems as easily as one.

Photos: Ubuntu 'Intrepid Ibix' boldly goes forth

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Ubuntu Linux developers Canonical have released their latest version of Ubuntu (8.10), Intrepid Ibix, into the wild. This screenshot gallery gives you a look at the new distribution and all the free goodies inside.

Ubuntu 8.10: What’s New?

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Ubuntu Another six months, another Ubuntu release. This time around the table we have the Intrepid Ibex; 8.10. Not quite a ground-breaking release, but rather the framework for one. Why do I say that? Because there isn’t much new immediately visible to the user. Let’s take a look.

Opera 9.62: To be released soon, try it now

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Software It looks like Opera is about to do a follow-up release of 9.62 to fix a zero-day flaw that made it into 9.61. The International install file is dated 10/29/2008 02:47:00 PM on the ftp server.

Linux to Ship on More Desktops than Windows

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Jim Zemlin: For those that decry the constant prediction of the “year of the Linux desktop” I am happy to say that next year Linux may actually ship on more desktops than Windows or the Mac. That is right, I said next year. What is driving this? Two words: fast boot.

Ubuntu Linux 8.10's five best features

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Ubuntu I've been running Ubuntu 8.10, aka "Intrepid Ibex," on a Gateway GT5622 and on a Lenovo R61 ThinkPad. On these PCs, Ubuntu 8.10 ran without any hiccups, so I could focus on the features.

distro shorts

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  • The road to Sabayon 4

  • Release Parties for OpenSUSE 11.1
  • Red Hat releases beta of Enterprise Linux 5.3
  • Fedora moves the X server
  • Patches for NetBSD

ALSA 1.0.18 Final Now Available, Lots of Changes

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Software It's been almost two months since ALSA 1.0.18 RC3 was released and about four months since ALSA 1.0.17 made it out the door, but today the final version of ALSA 1.0.18 is now available.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.

OSS in the Back End

  • AtScale Delivers Findings on BI-Plus-Hadoop
    Business intelligence is the dominant use-case for IT organizations implementing Hadoop, according to a report from the folks at AtScale. The benchmark study also shows which tools in the Haddop ecosystem are best for particular types of BI queries. As we've reported before, tools that demystify and function as useful front-ends and connectors for the open source Hadoop project are much in demand. AtScale, billed as “the first company to allow business users to do business intelligence on Hadoop,” focused its study on the strengths and weaknesses of the industry’s most popular analytical engines for Hadoop – Impala, SparkSQL, Hive and Presto.
  • Study Says OpenStack at Scale Can Produce Surprising Savings
    Revenues from OpenStack-based businesses are poised to grow by 35 percent a year to more than $5 billion by 2020, according to analysts at 451 Research. In its latest Cloud Price Index, 451 Research analyzes the costs associated with using various cloud options to determine when it becomes better value to use a self-managed private cloud instead of public or managed cloud services. The idea is to createa complex pricing model that takes into consideration the major factors impacting total cost of ownership (TCO), including salaries and workload requirements.The 451 study found that because of the prevalence of suitably qualified administrators, commercial private cloud offerings such as VMware and Microsoft currently offer a lower TCO when labor efficiency is below 400 virtual machines managed per engineer. But where labor efficiency is greater than this, OpenStack becomes more financially attractive. In fact, past this tipping point, all private cloud options are cheaper than both public cloud and managed private cloud options.
  • How OpenStack mentoring breaks down cultural barriers
    Victoria Martinez de la Cruz is no stranger to OpenStack's mentorship opportunities. It's how she got her own start in OpenStack, and now a few years later is helping to coordinate many of these opportunities herself. She is speaking on a panel on mentoring and internships later this week at OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Spain. In this interview, we catch up with Victoria to learn more about the details of what it's like to be a part of an open source internship, as well as some helpful advice for people on both sides of the mentoring process.