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Monday, 25 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ready for Firefox 4

Filed under
Moz/FF

manilastandardtoday.com: I LOOK forward to the day when the folks at Mozilla decide that Firefox 4 is ready to launch without the word “beta” attached to it.

openSUSE to Celebrate 11.4 with Virtual Dance Party

Filed under
SUSE

linuxjournal.com: Many large projects mark their significant releases with launch parties. But openSUSE has come up with a uniquely Gecko idea: a Secondlife.com virtual dance party.

Ubuntu Netbook Edition review

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcadvisor.co.uk: Ubuntu Netbook Edition is precisely what it sounds like: a version of the Ubuntu Linux operating system modified for use with netbook laptops.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Effy Does CrunchBang
  • A few new updates to Unity in Ubuntu 11.04 Alpha
  • What's on Sabayon's Agenda
  • Adobe open source code backs – gasp! – HTML5
  • World leaders using Drupal
  • Focus Group Open Source: Migration
  • Linux scores big in large-format printing
  • Twofolds Joy of using Ubuntu
  • OpenShot 1.3.0 release with new stuff
  • Bug fixes for MySQL 5.5
  • IT: Updated law presses public administrations to share software
  • Another nifty load meter: ttyload
  • Mandriva is seeking a security engineer
  • Meet the Man Behind the Jeopardy Super Computer
  • Introducing Opera 11.10 "Barracuda"
  • Raleigh Working To Address Complaints About New Website
  • MSQt™

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Duke Nukem 3D running natively on Ubuntu
  • Configure the Linux Grub2 Boot Menu the Easy Way
  • Change Grub background image in Squeeze
  • Linux IPTables: How to Add Firewall Rules
  • Ubuntu 10.10 setting up Mac OS Time Machine server
  • Install Krusader Twin Panel File Manager
  • Virtual Hosting in Apache Web Server On Debian
  • Troubleshooting Linux Servers with telnet
  • Using awk with Print and Printf
  • How to Add Skype Contacts to Pidgin IM
  • Working with Frames and Objects in Scribus
  • A Simple NFS File Server
  • Restore Grub Force, Filesystem Checks with Rescatux

Arch Steps Up – Debian Takes A Backseat

Filed under
Linux

lockergnome.com: I recently did some soul searching regarding my GNU/Linux philosophy. I found that I wasn’t being true to myself.

Mandriva 2011 Alpha 1 Released

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com: I am pleased to announce to you that the iso of Mandriva 2011 Alpha 1 just went out, and should be available in devel/isos/2011 directory on your favorite mirror shortly!

Mageia Announces First Alpha Release

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: Anne Nicolas has announced the first alpha release of Mageia (code name Cantine). The 32-bit or 64-bit DVD should be landing on mirrors very soon.

GNOME 3 User Day Kicks off Tomorrow

Filed under
Software

ubuntu-user.com: GNOME 3 User Days are a great opportunity for users to find out about GNOME 3 and to talk to members of the GNOME project about the new release. Everyone is welcome to get involved and ask questions about GNOME 3.

Mozilla losing Director of Firefox, Mike Belztner

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla losing Director of Firefox, Mike Belztner
  • Developer Engagement at Mozilla

Putting Your Brick In The Natty Wall

Filed under
Ubuntu

Jono Bacon: Wow, what a cycle Natty has been already. Back in Orlando, when Mark proposed Unity for inclusion in Ubuntu 11.04, we knew this cycle was going to be a busy one, and the Design, Desktop Experience, Ubuntu Platform, and community teams have been working at full steam to make Natty a rocking release.

Blog from your desktop with GNOME Blog

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: With my on-going search for making my life ever-easier, I have turned to using smaller applications to keep my readers and fans informed. This can get to be an overwhelming problem when you are tweeting, facebooking, blogging, and – oh yeah – writing.

Debian 6 review

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Debian 6.0, aka Debian “Squeeze”, is the latest stable release of Debian. It was made available for download earlier this month. In Debian country, a major release of this sort is a once-in-a-very-long-time event, unlike other distributions where it happens at least twice a year. This article provides a detailed review of Debian Squeeze.

Open source is for lovers

Filed under
OSS

opensource.com: It's true. If you think about the characteristics of open source and the qualities of a successful relationship, you will find a lot of overlap.

Ubuntu 11.04 Preview: run-one Improves Automated Tasks

Filed under
Software

thevarguy.com: It’s a safe bet that cron doesn’t rank highly on most Ubuntu users’ priority lists — in fact, I’d be surprised if a majority even know what cron is. For those who do, however, the Ubuntu 11.04 release in April promises some notable new features for cron.

Linux I love thee - users count the ways

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Linux users are sometimes derided by others as geeks or fan boys, dismissed by some who prefer the more popular Windows operating system (OS) or more posh Mac OS. But the Linux faithful have found something in Linux that lures them in and keeps them coming back for more.

Temple of Tangram Puzzle Game Now Has a Linux Version

Filed under
Gaming

techdrivein.com: Almost a day ago, developer Jochen Heizmann from Intermediaware informed us about the Linux port of his popular puzzle game Temple Of Tangram. I had never heard of it before(I am not an avid gamer of sorts) and so I decided to give it a first hand try.

Linux Mint 10 LXDE RC released

Filed under
Linux

How Do We Love Linux? Counting the Many Ways

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: While Slashdot blogger Barbara Hudson loves Linux for introducing her to the open source ecosystem, she didn't want to carry her ardor too far. "For Valentine's I prefer chocolate and and dinner with a few drinks," she said, "but my COMPUTER sure loves linux."

Living on the bleeding edge: Debian wheezy/sid

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsight.com: I've decided to start this blog and share my experience with Debian sid/unstable, the development version of Debian GNU/Linux. It's the leading edge, but sometimes also the bleeding edge of Debian development.

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More in Tux Machines

Review: BunsenLabs Helium

I have got a bit of soft spot for Openbox. I like how minimalist it is and how it hardly uses any system resources - according to my Conky panel BunsenLabs was using just over 200MB of RAM when idle. BunsenLabs provides a system that is usable out of the box but which can be tweaked any way you want. For this review I made the system cleaner and leaner but I could have gone in the opposite direction and create a desktop with conkies, panels and docks all over the place. DistroWatch's slogan, "put the fun back into computing", very much applies to BunsenLabs. In short, this is a distro I could easily use as my daily driver. My only concern would be the project's long term future. BunsenLabs Helium was released almost a year after Debian Stretch was released and then there is the worrying fact that Openbox doesn't work under Wayland, which is getting ever closer to replacing Xorg. BunsenLabs has got a sound community though, so I very much hope this distro will be around for many years to come. Read more

KaOS 2018.06

Just days after Plasma 5.13.1 was announced can you already see it on this new release. Highlights of Plasma 5.13 include optimising startup and minimising memory usage, yielding faster time-to-desktop, better runtime performance, and less memory consumption. System Settings with KDE’s Kirigami framework gives the pages a slick new look. KWin gained much-improved effects for blur and desktop switching. Wayland work continued, with the return of window rules, the use of high priority EGL Contexts, and initial support for screencasts and desktop sharing. And a tech preview of GTK global menu integration. Read more

8 reasons to use the Xfce Linux desktop environment

The Xfce desktop is thin and fast with an overall elegance that makes it easy to figure out how to do things. Its lightweight construction conserves both memory and CPU cycles. This makes it ideal for older hosts with few resources to spare for a desktop. However, Xfce is flexible and powerful enough to satisfy my needs as a power user. I've learned that changing to a new Linux desktop can take some work to configure it as I want—with all of my favorite application launchers on the panel, my preferred wallpaper, and much more. I have changed to new desktops or updates of old ones many times over the years. It takes some time and a bit of patience. I think of it like when I've moved cubicles or offices at work. Someone carries my stuff from the old office to the new one, and I connect my computer, unpack the boxes, and place their contents in appropriate locations in my new office. Moving into the Xfce desktop was the easiest move I have ever made. Read more

Programming: Go, Bugs and LLVM

  • 3 ways to copy files in Go
    This article will show you how to copy a file in the Go programming language. Although there are more than three ways to copy a file in Go, this article will present the three most common ways: using the io.Copy() function call from the Go library; reading the input file all at once and writing it to another file; and copying the file in small chunks using a buffer.
  • The life cycle of a software bug
    During the process of testing, bugs are reported to the development team. Quality assurance testers describe the bug in as much detail as possible, reporting on their system state, the processes they were undertaking, and how the bug manifested itself. Despite this, some bugs are never confirmed; they may be reported in testing but can never be reproduced in a controlled environment. In such cases they may not be resolved but are instead closed. It can be difficult to confirm a computer bug due to the wide array of platforms in use and the many different types of user behavior. Some bugs only occur intermittently or under very specific situations, and others may occur seemingly at random. Many people use and interact with open source software, and many bugs and issues may be non-repeatable or may not be adequately described. Still, because every user and developer also plays the role of quality assurance tester, at least in part, there is a good chance that bugs will be revealed.
  • LLVM's OpenMP Offloads Liboffload Into Oblivion
    The liboffload library has been dropped from LLVM's OpenMP repository. Liboffload is/was the Intel runtime library for offloading and geared for supporting the Xeon Phi co-processors. But liboffload within LLVM hasn't been receiving updates, it wasn't properly integrated within the LLVM build system, and unfortunately Xeon Phi co-processors appear to be discontinued. The liboffload library has also confused some with LLVM's libomptarget library for OpenMP support that is in much better shape.