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About Tux Machines

Monday, 22 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New Manjaro Linux Update Brings the Latest AMD Catalyst Drivers, Linux Kernel 4.1.2 Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2015 - 4:21pm
Story SUSE and ARM Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2015 - 4:08pm
Story Linux AIO Gathers All the Fedora 22 Live CDs into a Single ISO Image Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2015 - 4:01pm
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2015 - 3:55pm
Story 486 out of 500 in top 500 now run GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2015 - 3:49pm
Story How to get systems administrators and developers to agree with Docker Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2015 - 3:45pm
Story Leftovers: Kernel Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2015 - 3:38pm
Story Solus OS Now Boots in 3.5 Seconds Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2015 - 3:34pm
Story The Companies Most Active On The Systemd Mailing List Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2015 - 3:28pm
Story You Can Now Install Most of the Ubuntu Touch Core Apps on Your Ubuntu Desktop Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2015 - 3:23pm

Become a typeface pro with Fontmatrix

Filed under
Software

worldlabel.com: Casual computer users often give little thought to fonts, but once you starting working on design — from your web site to your stationary needs, you soon begin to appreciate the positive effects a good typeface can have on branding and marketing. The trouble comes when you start to collect more fonts on your system than you can keep track of.

Chumby, the Next Generation

Filed under
Hardware

linuxjournal.com: The folks over at www.chumby.com still sell the original Chumby device, but they've come out with a new model, the Chumby One. I'm rather fond of the numbering scheme they chose, because that would mean the original Chumby is number zero. If the next model is the Chumby 10, they will get extra geek points!

Why Tabs are on Top in Firefox 4

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.com/faaborg: In the Firefox 4 nightly builds, and in Firefox 4 Beta 1, we are changing the default tab position so that tabs are on top. This is a preference that users can change by right clicking on any of their toolbars.

Fedora 11 reaches end of life

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Fedora developer and Red Hat employee Paul W. Frields has announced that Fedora 11, code named "Leonidas", has reached its end of life.

Make the most of your tablet with My Paint

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: If you use Linux, have a tablet (or a pen/tablet addon), and want a graphics tool designed specifically for that device, you need to take a look at My Paint.

More distros at 150Mhz, both good and bad

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Arch Linux isn’t the only thing I have installed or used on the Mebius, since I brought it home a week ago. I did a few trial runs with other distros and OSes, although not all of them were as successful as archlinux-i586.

You Say Linux, I Say GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux

linux-magazine.com: The older I get, the more certain I am that most discussions consist of arguing over half-truths. In fact, the more strongly everyone argues, the more likely that nobody has the complete truth. And nowhere does these hard-won truisms seem more accurate than in the age-old argument over whether the operating system we all live by should be called Linux or GNU/Linux.

Put your knowledge where your mouth is.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: I get it, I get it. Your a fan boy, or fan person to be politically correct. As far as I am concerned it is everyones right and privilege to be able to express their beliefs. I also think that if somebody is going to make a statement then they should be able to back it up.

When GNOME Met KDE: Interview Stormy Peters

Filed under
Interviews

linuxinsider.com: Last year, the GNOME Foundation began hosting summits for developers alongside another desktop environment community: KDE. "In our meeting with the KDE conference, we're trying to cooperate in our common goal of providing a free desktop," said Stormy Peters.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Nokia to use Linux for flagship N-series phones
  • Glippy - Simple clipboard manager with image support
  • Low power Linux: wattOS R2 released
  • South Park Tux Wallpaper
  • NVIDIA promotes 256.35 to official release
  • Open source: inalienable right or company prerogative?
  • The Immortality of Open Source Projects
  • Introduction to Unity Launcher
  • Red Hat Linux and its close relationship with Microsoft?
  • New GNOME Foundation Conference Speaker Guidelines
  • Seeks delivers new search engine paradigm
  • Ubuntu: Harder to Use, or Just Harder to Spell?
  • LinuxCrazy Podcast 78 Gentoo Screenshots + IRC Basics
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 2 Episode 11

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using Vlookup() (or Hlookup()) in OpenOffice.org Calc
  • Perl Exporter Tutorial with Examples
  • Vinagre remote desktop connection for Linux
  • Device not managed in Ubuntu 10.04?
  • Delete SSH Keys
  • Install Linux Mint on Windows
  • gentoo + youtube – flash + mplayer
  • Ubuntu Lucid Lynx Tweaks
  • Guerrilla Tactics to Force Screen Mode in Ubuntu

Mozilla: Our browser will not run native code

Filed under
Moz/FF

theregister.co.uk: Mozilla vice president of products Jay Sullivan says that unlike Google, the open source outfit has no intention of bundling Firefox with Adobe Flash —– or with a plug-in that runs native code inside the browser. Mozilla, Sullivan says, believes that the future of online applications lies with web standards, including HTML5.

The myth of Arch Linux and the i586

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Jared asked the right question yesterday, when I proclaimed I had Arch Linux running on a Pentium MMX machine. How does a distro cut to fit the i686 generation downscale to an i586?

Ubuntu 10.04 Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

linusearch.com: I have been keeping an eye on Ubuntu for a long time. The operating system itself has put out a lack luster performance on previous installs. In the past each time I had installed Ubuntu there was always a show stopper of some sort.

Is the FLOSS Community Shooting Itself In the Foot?

Filed under
OSS

g33q.co.za: Recently my blog attracted a lot of attention from readers who are more critical of FLOSS, and Linux in particular, than my regular readership. Naturally a long discussion erupted where critiques and defenses of various positions and opinions and how stuff works where flung to and fro.

“Kiddie” Linux distros

Filed under
Linux

robinzrants.wordpress: But most of the grownup Linux users I know (and I’d bet the majority of all Linux users of any age) do use the so-called “kiddie” distros because they’re not into running the operating system, they just want to run applications.

Nautilus Elementary Simplifies File Browsing

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Nautilus, the default file manager in Gnome-based Linux operating systems such as Ubuntu and Fedora, isn’t exactly pretty to look at. In fact at times it’s downright confusing. This is why a group of coders have taken Nautilus’ lack of an overhaul into their own hands. The project, called Nautilus Elementary.

Group policy for Unix

theregister.co.uk: I wanted to compare Unix GPO setups to Microsoft’s Active Directory (AD) and Novell’s offerings, but I find that all the really good ones don’t so much “compare” to these directory services as “integrate with them.” The comparisons that can be made are largely “what kinds of things can I manage via GPO on Unix systems?”

Performing Image Magic with ImageMagick

Filed under
Software
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: It can be used from the command line for quick needs or built into a more complex software suite. This guide will cover some of the most “magical” features of ImageMagick and provide examples of how to use it to solve everyday tasks.

A Five-Way Linux Distribution Comparison In 2010

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: With many Linux distributions receiving major updates in recent weeks and months we have carried out a five-way Linux distribution comparison of openSUSE, Ubuntu, Fedora, PCLinuxOS, and Arch Linux. We have quite a number of tests comparing the 32-bit performance of these popular Linux distributions on older PC hardware.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Firefox 58.0, Paying it forward, Firefox Nightly, Lantea Maps

  • Firefox 58.0 “Quantum” Arrives With Faster Page Load Speeds And Code Compilation
    In November 2017, Mozilla launched its Firefox 57 web browser that was also called Firefox Quantum. It was hailed as a strong competitor to powerful Chrome web browser and we conducted a comparison of both browsers to give you a better idea. But, the story doesn’t end here; Mozilla is continuing to improve its work to deliver better performance with each release.
  • Paying it forward at Global Diversity CFP Day
    A CFP is a “Call for Papers” or “Call for Proposals” – many technical and academic conferences discover and vet speakers and their talk topics through an open, deadline-driven, online proposal submission process. This CFP process provides a chance for anyone to pitch a talk and pitch themselves as the presenter. Submitting a CFP, and having your proposal accepted, is one great way to get a foot in the door if you’re just getting started as a new speaker. And, for some developers, public speaking can be the door to many types of opportunity.
  • Firefox Nightly
    Creating a Gnome Dock launcher and a terminal command for Firefox Nightly About 18 months ago, Wil Clouser wrote a blog post on the very blog titled Getting Firefox Nightly to stick to Ubuntu’s Unity Dock. Fast forward to 2018, Ubuntu announced last year that it is giving up on their Unity desktop and will use Gnome Shell instead. Indeed, the last Ubuntu 17.10 release uses Gnome Shell by default. That means that the article above is slightly outdated now as its .desktop file was targeting the Unity environment which had its own quirks.
  • Lantea Maps Updates to Track Saving and Drawing
    After my last post on Lantea Maps (my web app to record GPS tracks), I started working on some improvements to its code. First, I created a new backend for storing GPS tracks on my servers and integrated it into the web app. You need to log in via my own OAuth2 server, and then you can upload tracks fairly seamlessly and nicely. The UI for uploading is now also fully integrated into the track "drawer" which should make uploading tracks a smoother experience than previously. And as a helpful feature for people who use Lantea Maps on multiple devices, a device name can be configured via the settings "drawer".

Red Hat and Fedora

Perl Advocacy

  • My DeLorean runs Perl
    My signature hobby project these days is a computerized instrument cluster for my car, which happens to be a DeLorean. But, whenever I show it to someone, I usually have to give them a while to marvel at the car before they even notice that there's a computer screen in the dashboard. There's a similar problem when I start describing the software; programmers immediately get hung up on "Why Perl???" when they learn that the real-time OpenGL rendering of instrument data is all coded in Perl. So, any discussion of my project usually starts with the history of the DeLorean or a discussion of the merits of Perl vs. other, more-likely tools.
  • An overview of the Perl 5 engine
    As I described in "My DeLorean runs Perl," switching to Perl has vastly improved my development speed and possibilities. Here I'll dive deeper into the design of Perl 5 to discuss aspects important to systems programming.

FOSS Linux App Development In Decline, Canonical Promotes Snap Using Proprietary Software

  • Is Native Linux App Development In Decline?
    A blog like mine thrives, in part, on there being a steady supply of good quality native Linux apps to write about. We do news too of course, and tutorials, how tos, lists, eye candy, and even the odd opinion piece (like this post). But I know you like reading about new and updated Linux apps, and, to be fair, I like writing about them. And yet… Where have all the Linux apps gone? Bear with me as what follows is more of a ramble than a coherent essay. For background, I’m writing this on day four of an enthusiasm drought.
  • Slack launches on Linux
  • Slack gets the Linux treatment: New snap available for Mint, Ubuntu, Debian, and more
    Slack is now available as a snap, which means Linux users can take advantage of the workplace collaboration platform, Canonical announced last week. Slack has recently debuted a number of features that make it more appealing to businesses, including Shared Channels and Private Shared Channels, which allow employees from different companies to work together on projects in private if they so choose. With more than 9 million weekly active users, Slack has gained a lot of traction in the enterprise, as noted by our sister site ZDNet. Back in October 2017, Linux overtook MacOS for the first time in terms of global operating system market share—which means the move opens up even more users to the Slack platform.
  • Canonical slaps Slack snap onto stack
    As the ‘company behind’ Ubuntu, Canonical has brought forward the first iteration of Slack as a snap on its software platform. Slack is a cloud-based set of proprietary team collaboration tools and services that go some way beyond core ‘messaging’ functionality into areas including project management.