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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story First beta of KDE Applications 4.13 is out Rianne Schestowitz 1 08/03/2014 - 10:17pm
Story Leftovers: Distros Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 6:42pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 6:38pm
Story DRM Kernel Log Renderer Proposed For Linux Rianne Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 6:35pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 6:34pm
Story Ubuntu 14.04 beta 1 offers a sneak peek at 'Trusty Tahr' Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 6:05pm
Story How to get a side launcher like Ubuntu on your Android device Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 6:02pm
Story Wine Announcement Rianne Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 2:12pm
Story Linux Kernel Patching Gets Dynamic Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 9:53am
Story Why your virtualization should be open-source Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 9:50am

Synfig: the free software alternative for 2D animation

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Software For a long time 2D animation software has been dominated by proprietary software. Synfig increases the 2D animation software available with a brilliant and professional piece of software.

Use nv, not nvidia drivers -> Save the headache

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Software As the majority of BSD/Linux users, I use for my X Window System. I decided to try the nvidia driver on my Arch Linux desktop. Arch has a good wiki to get nvidia with 3D rendering to work. I got it to work and was quite happy, for about a month at least. So what happened?

7 Apps Every Open Source Enthusiast Should Brag About

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Software During my years of Linux advocacy, I am usually asked a very basic question “what makes Linux better than [insert OS here].” I usually start with explaining that there are two fundamental schools of thought in the programming world. The conversation naturally goes from there to giving examples of Open Source programs this person might be using unwittingly.

"Kid Computers"

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Hardware I went to my local Toys "R" Us and asked about "sub notebooks". The guy said that we didn't have anything except "kid computers" I looked over in the direction he was pointing and saw the "Eee" display.

Full Circle Magazine Issue #18

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Issue 18 of Full Circle Magazine is finally available. This month's highlights include: Command and Conquer - Package Management, Review - Urban Terror, and My Story - Ubuntu And Me.

few more howtos:

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  • How to Integrate windows Active Directory and Samba in Ubuntu

  • Best practice tips for Gentoo sysadmins
  • How-To: Setting up BGP on Vyatta

odds & ends

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  • Funny Mozilla Bugs - Open Source Humor

  • Fix bad performance with NVidia 177.80 drivers
  • Install Adobe Flash Player 10 in openSUSE Linux
  • OpenSUSE opens up to non-Novell employees

more ubuntu stuff

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  • New Stuff I Love About Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

  • HOWTO : Lenovo Thinkpad scroll button on Ubuntu 8.10
  • update your gimp plug-ins on ubuntu 8.10

few for ubuntu fans

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  • 1 day with Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

  • 8 Reasons to try UBUNTU
  • Multimedia Support in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 44

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Issue #44 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: Less than 50 days to openSUSE 11.1, Results of the 1st openSUSE Board Election, and 3.0 final.

Faces behind Popular Programming Languages

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Software It’s quite fascinating to become familiar with the faces behind these programming languages, in which we spend hours learning or using it. Although the list may not be comprehensive but it contains almost all the popular programming language used in modern times.

A Visual Desktop Tour of 9 Ubuntu Releases

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Ubuntu Ubuntu, undoubtedly today's most popular Linux distribution has been around for 4 years. Its first official version was released in October of 2004. In the span of four years, Ubuntu has already unleashed 9 stable versions including the recently released Ubuntu 8.10 "Intrepid Ibex". Let's take a visual desktop tour of Ubuntu starting from its inaugural version:

Ubuntu 8.10 is here. And it rocks!

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I downloaded Ubuntu 8.10 "Interbid Ibex" today and i am currently using it as a Live-CD. Everything seems to be working perfectly until now, so i will install it tomorrow and suggest it to all my friends & colleagues if no serious problem arises. What did i like the first 2 hours of use?

Fedora 10 Cambridge - Review & Tutorial

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Linux I love RedHat-based distros. My favorite "server" distro is CentOS. Fedora is a community-developed distro, RPM-based, derived from RedHat when it turned into an enterprise product. CentOS branched off to mimic the enterprise releases as the server distro and Fedora became a household item. Fedora 10 Cambridge is the latest.

some howtos & such:

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  • How to use KDB in the openSUSE installation system

  • Install Puppy Linux in Ubuntu
  • Create avatars with MeMaker in Ubuntu
  • Fun with Linux Commands-III - Being productive
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Install using the built in USB Installer
  • The Linux Support Call HOWNOTTO

Compiz Fusion and MPX and Input Redirection Patches are now out

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smspillaz.wordpress: I figured that I should publish these before murphy’s law ensures that I either have a 1% chance of living the next day, or that the Australian Government censors me.

How To Upgrade Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) To 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) (Desktop & Server)

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Today the new Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) has been released. This guide shows how you can upgrade your Ubuntu 8.04 desktop and server installations to Ubuntu 8.10.

today's leftovers

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  • Linux Operating System

  • Too Late For Halloween - Almost Linux/Unix Humor
  • Building Online Success With Drupal
  • BBC prepares to stream content free to Linux users
  • Interview: Chris Morgan on Jopr
  • GDM 2.24 aka SMB (Shoot Me Bloody)
  • Selected Ibex Bugs
  • Linux to out ship Windows by next year … maybe not!
  • Four True Tech Horror Stories
  • Windows 7: Microsoft's Linux killer?
  • New beta version of Google's Chrome browser

some howtos:

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  • How to install KDE 4.1 on Ubuntu 8.10

  • Controlling fanspeeds in Linux on PWM motherboards, Thinkpads and ASUS Eee PC
  • How to properly start compiz in Gnome
  • Restoring Data from rdiff-backup
  • Create a LAN for Virtual Servers with KVM and VDE
  • Installing Microsoft Office and Internet Explorer in openSUSE with Crossover
  • Free Memory by dropping caches
  • Using Calc to manage schedules
  • Transparent compression of files on optical media
  • How To Easily Add A Custom Search Engine To Your Firefox Search Bar

A Halloween blog of open source fog

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blogs.the451group: I like to write a Halloween-theme article or blog every year, and this year, there is no shortage of costuming and character portrayal from vendors turning up in places you’d never expect them.

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More in Tux Machines

Rackspace and FOSS Report

  • The Rackspace State of Open Source
    As the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona kicks off, Rackspace has released a report entitled ‘The State of Open Source’. With every conference seemingly extolling the virtues of open source software, this report is timely. It manages to differentiate between enterprise open source and the wider open source software market.
  • Why digital transformation needs open source
    As if there wasn't already ample reason for businesses to switch to open source, Forrester analysts Paul Miller and Lauren E Nelson released a report in April 2016, entitled Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation — CIOs Need To Embrace Open Source Software To Drive Change, which further drives the point.
  • Despite Security Fears, Open Source Is Fuelling Innovation and Cost Savings in UK Businesses
  • Security concerns fail to hold back UK open source success
    However, despite its increasingly common use, many (54%) still perceive external security threats to be a big barrier to adoption, that’s according to a report published by Rackspace. The State of Open Source study, which was conducted among IT decision makers in UK businesses with over 1,000 employees and revenues over £500m, and looks at the ways open source is being used, its benefits, but also what is holding back adoption and business concerns. According to the report open source has come of age with 85% using open source technology to migrate a closed source project to open source. Open source also isn’t just a tool for small businesses; the vast majority (90%) of large businesses are now deploying open source-based enterprise applications, with 25% being completely open source. The reason for the growing adoption is because of the money and time savings. Rackspace found that for each project that had been migrated to open source technology, six out of ten organisations saved on average £30,146 and reduced project lifecycle by six months. Greater innovation was reported by many (49%), and 46% were driven to open source because of the competitive opportunities. Additionally, just under half (45%) said that it enabled them to get products and services to market faster. John Engates, Chief Technology Officer at Rackspace, said: “While open source technologies have been around for many years, it is great to see that enterprise businesses are finally dipping their toes in and seeing the tangible benefits.

FOSS and Blockchain

Security Leftovers

  • The internet apocalypse map hides the major vulnerability that created it
    During Friday’s massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on DNS service provider Dyn, one might be forgiven for mistaking the maps of network outages for images of some post-apocalyptic nuclear fallout. Screenshots from sites like showed menacingly red, fuzzy heat maps of, well, effectively just population centers of the United States experiencing serious difficulty accessing Twitter, Github, Etsy, or any of Dyn's other high-profile clients. Aside from offering little detail and making a DDoS literally into a glowing red menace, they also obscured the reality of just how centralized a lot of internet infrastructure really is. DNS is ground zero for the uneasy tension of the internet’s presumed decentralized resilience and the reality that as of now, translating IP addresses into domain names requires some kind of centralized, hierarchical platform, and that’s probably not going to radically change anytime soon. Other maps provided by various business to business network infrastructure companies weren’t much more helpful. These maps seem to exist mostly to signal that the companies in question have lots of cool data and that it can be made into a flashy map — which might impress potential customers, but that doesn’t offer a ton of insights for the layperson. For example, threat intelligence company Norse's map appears to be mostly a homage to the Matthew Broderick movie War Games: a constant barrage of DDoS attacks beaming like space invader rockets across a world map. Akamai has an impressive 3D visualization that renders traffic as points beaming into the atmosphere. And website monitoring service Pingdom offers a dot map at such a far-out zoom level that it's essentially useless for seeking out more meaningful patterns than "outages happen in population centers, also there are a lot of outages."
  • CoreOS Patched Against the "Dirty COW" Linux Kernel Vulnerability, Update Now
  • World’s first hack-proof router launched
    Turris Omnia router, tagged the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic. As an essential part of any home internet network, routers are rather poorly secured and protected against cyber attack. More often than not, the only security feature is the default password. With easily required internet knowledge and some skills, these routers can be hacked, providing unauthorized access to a complete internet network. From there on, anything is possible.

ARM/FPGA module runs Linux on Arria 10 SoC

iWave’s rugged, Linux-friendly, 95 x 75mm “Arria 10 SoC Module” expands upon the dual-core, ARM/FPGA SoC from Altera with DDR4 and 24 transceivers. The iWave Systems Arria 10 SoC Module builds upon Intel/Altera’s Arria 10 SX SoC, a faster, newer sibling to the Cyclone V SX, which iWave tapped for its Qseven based iW-RainboW-G17M-Q7 COM and iW-RainboW-G17D development board combo. Both the Cyclone V SoC and Arria 10 SoC combine dual-core Cortex-A9 subsystems with FPGA circuitry, but the Arria 10 boosts the ARM clock speed to 1.5GHz, up from 800MHz, and offers a higher end FPGA. Read more