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Saturday, 20 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story FreeBSD 10.2 Beta 1 Now Ready for Download and Testing Rianne Schestowitz 13/07/2015 - 8:05pm
Story Zorin OS 10 RC Screenshot Tour - A Gorgeous New Design for a Different OS Rianne Schestowitz 13/07/2015 - 8:02pm
Story Review: SolydK 201506 Rianne Schestowitz 13/07/2015 - 7:56pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/07/2015 - 2:12pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 13/07/2015 - 2:09pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/07/2015 - 2:09pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 13/07/2015 - 2:08pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 13/07/2015 - 2:07pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/07/2015 - 2:04pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 13/07/2015 - 2:03pm

You Say Linux, I Say GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux

linux-magazine.com: The older I get, the more certain I am that most discussions consist of arguing over half-truths. In fact, the more strongly everyone argues, the more likely that nobody has the complete truth. And nowhere does these hard-won truisms seem more accurate than in the age-old argument over whether the operating system we all live by should be called Linux or GNU/Linux.

Put your knowledge where your mouth is.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: I get it, I get it. Your a fan boy, or fan person to be politically correct. As far as I am concerned it is everyones right and privilege to be able to express their beliefs. I also think that if somebody is going to make a statement then they should be able to back it up.

When GNOME Met KDE: Interview Stormy Peters

Filed under
Interviews

linuxinsider.com: Last year, the GNOME Foundation began hosting summits for developers alongside another desktop environment community: KDE. "In our meeting with the KDE conference, we're trying to cooperate in our common goal of providing a free desktop," said Stormy Peters.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Nokia to use Linux for flagship N-series phones
  • Glippy - Simple clipboard manager with image support
  • Low power Linux: wattOS R2 released
  • South Park Tux Wallpaper
  • NVIDIA promotes 256.35 to official release
  • Open source: inalienable right or company prerogative?
  • The Immortality of Open Source Projects
  • Introduction to Unity Launcher
  • Red Hat Linux and its close relationship with Microsoft?
  • New GNOME Foundation Conference Speaker Guidelines
  • Seeks delivers new search engine paradigm
  • Ubuntu: Harder to Use, or Just Harder to Spell?
  • LinuxCrazy Podcast 78 Gentoo Screenshots + IRC Basics
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 2 Episode 11

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using Vlookup() (or Hlookup()) in OpenOffice.org Calc
  • Perl Exporter Tutorial with Examples
  • Vinagre remote desktop connection for Linux
  • Device not managed in Ubuntu 10.04?
  • Delete SSH Keys
  • Install Linux Mint on Windows
  • gentoo + youtube – flash + mplayer
  • Ubuntu Lucid Lynx Tweaks
  • Guerrilla Tactics to Force Screen Mode in Ubuntu

Mozilla: Our browser will not run native code

Filed under
Moz/FF

theregister.co.uk: Mozilla vice president of products Jay Sullivan says that unlike Google, the open source outfit has no intention of bundling Firefox with Adobe Flash —– or with a plug-in that runs native code inside the browser. Mozilla, Sullivan says, believes that the future of online applications lies with web standards, including HTML5.

The myth of Arch Linux and the i586

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Jared asked the right question yesterday, when I proclaimed I had Arch Linux running on a Pentium MMX machine. How does a distro cut to fit the i686 generation downscale to an i586?

Ubuntu 10.04 Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

linusearch.com: I have been keeping an eye on Ubuntu for a long time. The operating system itself has put out a lack luster performance on previous installs. In the past each time I had installed Ubuntu there was always a show stopper of some sort.

Is the FLOSS Community Shooting Itself In the Foot?

Filed under
OSS

g33q.co.za: Recently my blog attracted a lot of attention from readers who are more critical of FLOSS, and Linux in particular, than my regular readership. Naturally a long discussion erupted where critiques and defenses of various positions and opinions and how stuff works where flung to and fro.

“Kiddie” Linux distros

Filed under
Linux

robinzrants.wordpress: But most of the grownup Linux users I know (and I’d bet the majority of all Linux users of any age) do use the so-called “kiddie” distros because they’re not into running the operating system, they just want to run applications.

Nautilus Elementary Simplifies File Browsing

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Nautilus, the default file manager in Gnome-based Linux operating systems such as Ubuntu and Fedora, isn’t exactly pretty to look at. In fact at times it’s downright confusing. This is why a group of coders have taken Nautilus’ lack of an overhaul into their own hands. The project, called Nautilus Elementary.

Group policy for Unix

theregister.co.uk: I wanted to compare Unix GPO setups to Microsoft’s Active Directory (AD) and Novell’s offerings, but I find that all the really good ones don’t so much “compare” to these directory services as “integrate with them.” The comparisons that can be made are largely “what kinds of things can I manage via GPO on Unix systems?”

Performing Image Magic with ImageMagick

Filed under
Software
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: It can be used from the command line for quick needs or built into a more complex software suite. This guide will cover some of the most “magical” features of ImageMagick and provide examples of how to use it to solve everyday tasks.

A Five-Way Linux Distribution Comparison In 2010

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: With many Linux distributions receiving major updates in recent weeks and months we have carried out a five-way Linux distribution comparison of openSUSE, Ubuntu, Fedora, PCLinuxOS, and Arch Linux. We have quite a number of tests comparing the 32-bit performance of these popular Linux distributions on older PC hardware.

ownCloud 1.0 is here

Filed under
Software

blog.karlitschek.de: ownCloud is a central place where you can store your files and documents. You don´t have to upload your personal data to central closed services like Google Docs, Dropbox or Ubuntu One. All the data is under your own control.

Top 10 Cursors For X Window System

Filed under
Software

linuxnov.com: Cool Cursors collection for X 11 window system, including animated cursors for different installed applications, some of those cursors will look really good for dark themes, and bright themes.

Capturing screen shots and program interaction on UNIX and Linux systems

Filed under
Linux

Modern UNIX systems provide a number of different tools to capture the text-oriented interaction between a user and a specific program and to capture graphical screens and single windows. This article focuses on different ways to keep a record of the interaction between a user and a command-line application.

Break your Ubuntu Addiction: Three Strong Distros

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: No one can make the claim that Ubuntu isn't becoming the de facto Linux distro out there in the world today. Sadly, there is also a problem with watching Linux being tied to a single experience. Choice goes right out the window. So thankfully, despite Ubuntu's success, there are some fantastic alternatives out there that fit the needs of most people.

Attack of the Cosmic Rays

Filed under
Hardware

blog.ksplice.com: RAM in modern computers is susceptible to occasional random bit flips due to various sources of noise, most commonly high-energy cosmic rays. A few weeks ago, though, I encountered some bizarre behavior on my desktop, that honestly just didn’t make sense.

NetworkManager will drive people away from GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: One of the great plus points about running GNU/Linux used to be the continuous process of improvement going on - and the fact that one did not have to wait very long to sample those improvements if one wished to do so. But in recent times, given the great push to make everything running on GNU/Linux graphically-oriented, that seems to have changed.

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.