Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 21 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Would the Internet Exist without Linux? Yes. Without Open Source? No Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2015 - 6:16pm
Story Valve Makes SteamOS 2.0 the Official Distro, Now Based on Debian 8.2 Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2015 - 6:11pm
Story KDE Signs the User Data Manifesto 2.0 Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2015 - 6:09pm
Story Android 6.0, Marshmallow: The complete FAQ Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2015 - 5:59pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 07/10/2015 - 5:19pm
Story What Are Linux Meta-packages? Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2015 - 11:42am
Story systemd is your friend Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2015 - 11:39am
Story LibreOffice 4.4.6 to Be Last in the Series, New RC Is Out Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2015 - 11:31am
Story Azul Zing goes live on Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Amazon Web Services Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2015 - 11:27am
Story How to move the needle in open source Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2015 - 11:24am

NZ Open Source Awards winners announced

Filed under
OSS

geekzone.co.nz: This evening the NZ Open Source Awards 2010 celebrated and rewarded the best and most innovative in New Zealand’s open source software at a gala event attended by more than 200 people at the Intercontinental Wellington.

Installing Nginx With PHP5 (And PHP-FPM) And MySQL Support On Ubuntu 10.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Nginx (pronounced "engine x") is a free, open-source, high-performance HTTP server. Nginx is known for its stability, rich feature set, simple configuration, and low resource consumption. This tutorial shows how you can install Nginx on an Ubuntu 10.10 server with PHP5 support (through PHP-FPM) and MySQL support.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The browser wars: side with Opera.
  • Shhh... Opera holds the web's most valuable secret
  • Fedora Scholarship Program Encourages Open Source Innovation
  • A Few Tips on Managing Access Remotely
  • Open core by the numbers
  • Smackdown: Linux on X64 Versus IBM i on Entry Power 7XXs
  • FSFLA: Linux kernel is "open core"
  • First peek at the new look ‘Do’ launcher (Gnome-do)
  • Remmina to be Ubuntu’s new remote desktop app
  • How do I compile my windows programs under Linux?
  • BetterMeans: a new app for running your organization the open source way
  • GNU Spotlight with Karl Berry (October 2010)
  • Video uploading/downloading to feature in Shotwell 0.8
  • Playing with EDID and rawhide
  • Five alternative apps for ALT+F2
  • Mageia Roadmap
  • Mandriva first to include virtualization technologies at the system level
  • Linux Alternative To Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 Goes Into Beta
  • KDEMU with Ian Monroe
  • Fedora Board Meeting, 8 Nov 2010
  • Icelandic developer receives Nordic Free Software Award
  • GNOME Shell 2.91.2 released
  • Procurement Jobs: Desktop Productivity Tools 'Key To Open Source'
  • Savvytek achieves Red Hat partnership in Saudi and Qatar

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Barcode Writer in Pure PostScript
  • Google CL for Linux explained
  • Wireshark II: The Analysis
  • How to upgrade (convert) ext3 to ext4 file system
  • Build a Linux Web Server With An Old Computer [Part 2]
  • Introduction to awk
  • Last.fm Mix radio with the linux client
  • Creating a Betfair Bot Part 2
  • KDE 4.5.3 available for Mandriva 2010
  • Panflute: Control Your Favourite Music Player From Gnome Panel
  • Secure Your PC and Website From Firesheep Session Hijacking
  • Finding all mysql user privileges
  • Gting to know Alice
  • Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat in VirtualBox
  • speed up the booting process for Grub2 boot loader using profiling
  • More Layers
  • How To: Change run levels in Linux
  • Install Ubuntu Maverick On Your Mac Virtualbox
  • Install MyPaint

Alternative Linux distros that deserve the limelight

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: Ubuntu might be the most popular Linux, but there are two other desktop distributions which have a lot to offer but aren't getting the publicity they deserve, says Ashton Mills.

Shuttleworth: critics would do well to get a clue

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Few people in the free and open source software these days have to put up with as much criticism of their motives and moves as the owner of Canonical, Mark Shuttleworth.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 217

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 217
  • Debian Project News - November 8th

Happy birthday Firefox!

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: Six years ago today, (9 November 2004), Firefox 1.0 hit the servers.

Learning to Program

Filed under
Software

goodbyemicrosoft.net: Linux user who wants to learn computer programming. Linux is an excellent choice for this, because there are a huge number of programming languages available for it....and all free.

Taking Nautilus Terminal for a spin

Filed under
Software

scottnesbitt.net: My main ways of getting to the command line are Guake (a drop-down terminal) and the Nautilus open-terminal script. Nothing wrong with either, but I got excited when I heard about Nautilus Terminal.

The new Linux Desktop: Ubuntu's Unity

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The new Linux Desktop: Ubuntu's Unity
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Delayed, Release Schedule Changed
  • Why Wayland is good for the future of Ubuntu, Canonical, etc.
  • It’s All In The Wording
  • Canonical axing X Windows: What will it mean for Ubuntu?
  • Ubuntu Colored - Beautiful Ubuntu Wallpaper Collection
  • Announcing openrespect.org
  • Quick Look: Ubuntu Muslim Edition 10.10 (Sabily Al Quds)
  • Linux Life savers for paranoid penguins

5 reasons why a Debian package is more than a simple file archive

Filed under
Linux
Software

raphaelhertzog.com: You’re probably manipulating Debian packages everyday, but do you know what those files are? This article will show you their bowels…

Why You Should Only Buy Linux Pre-Installed on your Systems

Filed under
Linux

geeksaresexy.net (Mackenzie Morgan): Many Linux users are geeks, and vice versa, and geeks can build their own systems or at least install an OS, so why should we buy systems with Linux pre-installed? Why is it so important if the OS is free? Let’s talk about a little thing called “market share.”

Red Hat Is Last Man Standing in Open Source Market

Filed under
Linux

seekingalpha.com: I took flak recently concerning a blog post that said that Red Hat was no different than IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and most other enterprise software suppliers in terms of business model, despite statements to the contrary by Red Hat CEO James Whitehurst.

Nautilus-Elementary is dead, long live ‘Marlin’

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: The honeymoon is over folks: Nautilus-elementary is no longer being actively developed.

50 Most Frequently Used Linux Commands

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

thegeekstuff.com: This article provides practical examples for 50 most frequently used commands in Linux / UNIX.

24 things we'd change about Linux

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: If you use Linux long enough, you'll soon discover a list of things you wished were different. Here are 24 things that we wish were different.

Linux: Does Being Competitive with Windows Matter?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

earthweb.com: How many times have you heard this statement: "It's the year of the Linux desktop." Not recently? Then how about "Linux is making gains on the Windows desktop"? Still leaving a bad taste in your mouth? Bet I know why.

Thanks for the $3700, Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

kmandla.wordpress: I have a fun question for Linux users today: What will you do with your US$3700? That’s the money you won’t have to pay to Microsoft, over the course of your lifetime, to use your computer.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 379

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: Trying on a new Fedora
  • News: Ubuntu embraces Wayland, PC-BSD launches first 9.0 snapshot, Mageia announces roadmap, MeeGo's growing pains
  • Questions and answers: Blocking access to inappropriate websites
  • Released last week: Fedora 14, OpenBSD 4.8, Sabayon Linux 5.4 "Experimental Spins"
  • New distributions: CTKArchLive, Fortress Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

DragonFlyBSD 5.2, TrueOS 18.03, FreeBSD 11.1, Ubuntu 16.04/18.04 & Clear Linux Tests

This week I posted some benchmarks looking at the Meltdown mitigation impact on BSD vs. Linux as well as some tests of DragonFly's stabilized HAMMER2 while for your viewing pleasure this weekend are a variety of general BSD vs. Linux benchmarks while using the newly-released DragonFlyBSD 5.2, TrueOS 18.03, FreeBSD 11.1, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Ubuntu 18.04, and Intel's Clear Linux. All of these BSD/Linux operating system benchmarks were done using a system with an Intel Xeon E3-1280 v5 Skylake CPU, MSI MS-7998 motherboard, 2 x 8GB DDR4-2133 memory, and a 256GB Toshiba RD-400 NVMe SSD. All of the hardware components were maintained the same throughout the entire testing process. For making the systems comparable and testing the operating systems in the manner set by the vendor, each platform was tested "out of the box" using the default settings. Read more

Best Linux apps of 2018

While everyone knows that most Linux distributions (distros) are free to download, not everybody is aware that you also have access to thousands of cost-free applications through your operating system’s package manager. Many of the more user-friendly distros will come with a selection of software preinstalled to help you get started, but there are many more apps out in the wild, under continuous development. Read more

today's leftovers

  • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes
    Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.
  • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless
    Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.
  • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

    The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

  • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage
    Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all. The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.
  • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)
    Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.
  • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27
    Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system. Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.
  • Installed nvidia driver
  • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
  • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018
    The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.
  • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!
    We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.
  • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875
    Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

OSS Leftovers

  • IRS Website Crash Reminder of HealthCare.gov Debacle as OMB Pushes Open Source
    OMB is increasingly pushing agencies to adopt open source solutions, and in 2016 launched a pilot project requiring at least 20 percent of custom developed code to be released as open source – partly to strengthen and help maintain it by tapping a community of developers. OMB memo M-16-21 further asks agencies to make any code they develop available throughout the federal government in order to encourage its reuse. “Open source solutions give agencies access to a broad community of developers and the latest advancements in technology, which can help alleviate the issues of stagnated or out-dated systems while increasing flexibility as agency missions evolve over time,” says Henry Sowell, chief information security officer at Hortonworks Federal. “Enterprise open source also allows government agencies to reduce the risk of vendor lock-in and the vulnerabilities of un-supported software,” he adds.
  • Migrations: the sole scalable fix to tech debt.

    Migrations are both essential and frustratingly frequent as your codebase ages and your business grows: most tools and processes only support about one order of magnitude of growth before becoming ineffective, so rapid growth makes them a way of life. This isn't because they're bad processes or poor tools, quite the opposite: the fact that something stops working at significantly increased scale is a sign that it was designed appropriately to the previous constraints rather than being over designed.

  • Gui development is broken

    Why is this so hard? I just want low-level access to write a simple graphical interface in a somewhat obscure language.