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About Tux Machines

Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 07/08/2015 - 4:22pm
Story KDE's Breeze Icons Get Expanded For Plasma 5.4 Rianne Schestowitz 07/08/2015 - 3:43pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 07/08/2015 - 3:36pm
Story Ubuntu's Deb-Based Software Center Fails As An App Store Rianne Schestowitz 07/08/2015 - 2:59pm
Story Linux Mint 17.2 "Rafaela" KDE Released with KDE 4.14.2 and Linux Kernel 3.16 Rianne Schestowitz 07/08/2015 - 2:48pm
Story A Couple of Mockups for Plasma Mobile Look Better than the Original Rianne Schestowitz 07/08/2015 - 2:45pm
Story digiKam Software Collection 4.12.0 released... Rianne Schestowitz 07/08/2015 - 2:39pm
Story Apple v Android debate: And the winner is ... Rianne Schestowitz 07/08/2015 - 2:30pm
Story Who will be the Ubuntu of Hadoop? Rianne Schestowitz 07/08/2015 - 10:53am
Story LibreOffice 5.0 Is a Milestone Release for Ubuntu Touch Rianne Schestowitz 07/08/2015 - 10:42am

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Find fastest mirrors for yum CentOS/Fedora/RHEL
  • Die Flash Cookie, Die!
  • Add a Word Count Feature to Tomboy
  • Am I running 32-bit or 64-bit Linux?
  • Even more GNOME keyboard shortcuts
  • Equinox GTK Theme + Faenza Icon Theme = Awesomeness!
  • Easily Create a Custom Lightweight Desktop Environment
  • Regular expressions for everyone: The basics
  • How to enable Autologin to Linux console using mingetty
  • RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 10 Explained with Diagrams
  • Smart Cards and Secret Agents
  • Disable the Ugly Gnome Metacity Minimize Effect
  • How to use teapot like a pro
  • New Illumination Tutorial
  • arranging windows from the gnu/linux command line with wmctrl
  • Lazy sound notification

ON TEST: Jolicloud Netbook OS

apcmag.com: With netbooks, you can either run "lite" software, or push the grunt work into the cloud. Jolicloud OS, based on Ubuntu, aims to do the latter.

Changing distributions: openSUSE?

Filed under
SUSE

blogs.gnome.org: Due to everything that has happened at Mandriva, I guess it is time to switch distributions. I have no idea when I made the switch to Mandriva, but I know for certain I’ve used it for the last 5 years. At the moment I’m considering Fedora and openSUSE.

DeviantArt’s Muro Drawing App Is Pure HTML5 Awesomeness

Filed under
Software
Web

webmonkey.com: The folks at DeviantArt, a website best known for hosting images of fairies and vampires created by gothy art students, have debuted a new browser-based drawing tool created entirely with web standards.

Q&A with Richard Stallman

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

computerworld.com.au: Free software is a different beast from gratis software. Free software activist, Richard Stallman, discusses the importance of freedom across all modes of computing.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 135 is out

Filed under
SUSE

We are pleased to announce our new openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 135.

Thousands Play Starcraft 2 on Linux

Filed under
Gaming

jeffhoogland.blogspot: I play Starcraft 2 on Linux and apparently I'm not the only one.

A look at Emacs

Filed under
Software

technologytales.com: It’s amazing what work can bring your way in terms of technology. For me, (GNU) Emacs Has proved to be such a thing recently. It may have been around since 1975, long before my adventures in computing ever started in fact, but I am asking myself why I never really have used it much.

Missing From Linux 2.6.36

Filed under
Linux
  • Missing From Linux 2.6.36: VIA's TTM/GEM DRM
  • Ubuntu Kernel Developer releases Firmware Test Suite
  • Deviant Google Android probes Linux kernel re-entry
  • Stable kernel updates

Linux is a time killer

Filed under
Linux

mostlymaths.net: I have been using Linux since around 1998, when I installed Debian from scratch in my old Pentium II. I am more end-user than power user, but the computer I use most often (my netbook) has Linux in it by default. Linux is a time waster. It can come in two time-wasting fashion:

Ubootnu versus the neck beards

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubootnu versus the neck beards
  • Of GNU/Linux, Hardliners and a clear case of double standards!

Oracle Loves Linux

  • Oracle Loves Linux, Has Advice for Improvements
  • Oracle Previews Solaris 11

Spin Your Own Debian with Live Studio

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: In the tradition of Nimblex and SUSE Studio comes an alternative for those who prefer Debian. Debian Live Studio allows users to build their own Debian Live system with just a few mouse clicks.

The consistent failure of Linux to grab even 1% of the desktop OS market

Filed under
Linux

royal.pingdom.com: Linux has been around for almost two decades now. It has become a resounding success as a server OS (for example as the L in the famous LAMP stack), and more recently as a mobile OS (Android). But what about on the desktop?

Can we count users without uniquely identifying them?

Filed under
Ubuntu

theravingrick.blogspot: The customer's engineer came up with a system where they would create a unique identifier for each Ubuntu computer they sold, and then when the computers requested update info daily, it would send that unique identifier with it. The customer didn't really want to use a unique identifier though.

LinuxCon: Exploits Show Why Linux Is Vulnerable

Filed under
Linux
Security

esecurityplanet.com: There is a widely held belief that Linux is a completely secure operating system. But to Brad Spengler of the grsecurity project, the belief is far from accurate. And he has the kernel exploits to prove it.

Desktop Linux: Great for the Environment, Bad for Economy?

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Is using desktop Linux better for the environment than say, running Microsoft Windows or Apple's OS X?

Mandriva 2010 Spring review

Filed under
MDV

linuxbsdos.com: Being awhile since Mandriva 2010 Spring was released. Considering the company’s financial woes, and the rumored takeover negotiations, we thought they might never release it, but they did.

Ubuntu and the importance of community

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxuser.co.uk: Canonical developer Dave Walker investigates the importance of governance in a community as rich and diverse as Ubuntu’s…

Five Tips To Get The Most Out Of KDE 4.5

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

itnewstoday.com: To help you make the most out of this new version, I decided to compile a list of tips that I feel makes the most of this revolutionary desktop.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11

Thanks to work done by Hans Petter Selasky and others, this drm-next-kmod port is working on FreeBSD 11 stable. What's different with this package from the ports collection versus the ported-from-Linux Direct Rendering Modules found within the FreeBSD 11 kernel is that these DRM modules are using the linuxkpi interface. Read more

Fedora and Red Hat's Finances

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)
    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.
  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world
    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.
  • Introducing deviced
    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices. Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi
    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.
  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!
    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks. One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding! Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.