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Thursday, 20 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Three Turning Points, KDE Releases, and Loving Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2014 - 7:24am
Story WINE and Linux gaming Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2014 - 7:16am
Story Critical crypto bug leaves Linux, hundreds of apps open to eavesdropping Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2014 - 1:29am
Story Buying Chromebooks for their Hardware, not their OS Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2014 - 1:24am
Story SUSE Labs Director Talks Live Kernel Patching with kGraft Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2014 - 12:52am
Story KDE Frameworks 5 Alpha Two Is Out Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2014 - 12:44am
Story Mozilla Whitelists Some Firefox Extensions, But Has it Out for Them Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2014 - 12:36am
Story Radeon Gallium3D Performance Gets Close To Catalyst On Ubuntu 14.04 Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2014 - 12:28am
Story Could Open Source Be An Engine For The Internet Of Things? Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2014 - 12:15am
Story Oh No, Mageia has Lost its Magic Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2014 - 12:06am

20+ Firefox 3 Security and Privacy Extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF While Firefox is considered a safe browser by most people, it can never hurt to add more layers of security in this day and age. And while you’re at it, there are a number of ways to increase your privacy online. Here are over 20.

some shorts

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  • Funny FireFox Ads

  • Linux Journal Live - Horror Stories
  • Linux Basement - Episode 30 - Season Finale and OLF

How Linux Supports More Devices Than Any Other OS, Ever

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Interviews Kroah-Hartman is a longtime developer of the Linux kernel, known for his work maintaining USB drivers as well as for packaging the SUSE kernel at Novell. O'Reilly Media recently interviewed Greg about his claim that the Linux kernel now supports more devices than any other operating system ever.

some ubuntu stuff

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  • Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex': Some Good, Some Bad, And A Lot Of Ugly

  • A User's Look at Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex
  • Solutions for Nvidia restricted drivers after Ubuntu 8.10 Upgrade
  • Beware Ubuntu 8.10 “Cruft Remover”

Switching your kids to Linux

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Linux Based on some of the feedback on my previous postings, there seems to be some interest in this topic. I'm sure that this is more like Perl than Python (there is more than one way to do it), but this is how I managed it....

New Qt Creator IDE from Qt Software

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Software News emerged recently that Qt Software (formerly Trolltech) were working on their first IDE for Qt, code named Project Greenhouse. Today saw the release of the first technical preview under the name Qt Creator. The initial release is available for Linux, Mac OS X and MS Windows.

The scariest video game of all time

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Gaming Last week we asked our readers to vote for the most frightening game of all time. The votes have been counted and the results are in - our readers reveal their top 15 pixilated horrors.

This is the money being made TODAY in Open Source

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OSS While many companies don’t disclose detailed financial information we have dug around to find numbers for some well-known open source companies and projects to see how they are doing financially.

15 Scariest Tux Icons for Halloween

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Linux Since it's Halloween, let me give you a treat by sharing to you all some of the scariest tux icons in existence. Before going on, let me warn those with a weak heart that what you are about to see could be dangerous to your health.

The Scariest Things in Open Source

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OSS Since today is Halloween, I thought that an article discussing some of the scary things in the FOSS world would be a nice touch. What are the scariest things in Open Source?

Is Linux The Quick-Boot Miracle Fix? Don't Bet On It

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Linux Will demand for quick-booting PCs give Linux a leg up on Windows? That's how some folks see it, but I'm not one of them.

Fedora 7 to 10 Benchmarks

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Linux Earlier this week we published benchmarks of all Ubuntu releases from 7.04 to the release candidate and had found the performance degraded with time, at least with the test system we used. As part of our testing to explore this issue, we had repeated many of the same tests on Fedora with all of their releases going back to Fedora 7. Has Fedora's desktop performance degraded too?

LXDE, A stable and lightweight desktop environment

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linuxpoison.blogspot: LXDE is the abbreviation for Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment. LX also stands for LinuX. You will find it different from other desktop environments, due to its discrete components, which can be used independently and with few dependencies.

Review: Sabayon 3.5 Pod

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Linux ince both Gentoo and Sabayon were included on this Linux Format DVD, I decided I would first try and install Gentoo and then Sabayon and compare how easy the installations were since Sabayon is a derivative distro from Gentoo.

VMware Server 2 shows some improvement

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Software Despite being an entry-level server virtualization product, many people used VMware Server on the desktop. Taking that into consideration, you have to look at the recently released VMware Server 2, from two angles -- as an entry-level server virtualization platform and as an alternative to desktop virtualization products like VirtualBox. With its performance and other improvements, it does enough to keep existing customers happy, but probably not enough to get others to switch.

Ubuntu 8.10: what's new, Doc?

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Ubuntu Why do people climb Mount Everest? Well, because it's there, I guess. Why do so many people dislike George Bush? Saves a lot of time, I guess. Why do people keep downloading every new release of Ubuntu?

Also: Linux Kernel Regression in Ubuntu 8.10. Upgrade Now!
And: Ubuntu Linux 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) - Configuration Tips

today's leftovers

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  • Million’s of Linux Users, they can’t all be experts

  • Getting KMS Ready For Linux 2.6.29 Kernel
  • Cool New Happenings in uPnP and Telepathy Land
  • There is one global market in an open source world
  • GNOME Annual Report 2008 Kickoff
  • Open-source Silverlight slips into second gear
  • Prizefight: Battle of the browsers
  • vs. NextWiki: open source developers go their own way
  • openSUSE 11.1 Beta 4 Slip
  • sudo zypper up from factory repo now requires EULA Agreement
  • AlgoScore - Music By The Numbers
  • Gentoo 2008.0 - a second attempt
  • New DMX Server Provides More Features, Less Complex
  • My Daily WTF!
  • Open source technology casts new perspective on China's development
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex, Released and Reviewed
  • Review: Ubuntu 8.10 Is The Real Deal

some howtos:

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  • how to drain your entropy and have fun with ssh fingerprint ASCII-art

  • Netconsole: how to get kernel messages you would not get otherwise
  • Common vi editor command list
  • How survive zypper dup on system with bad internet connection
  • Parallel SSH execution and a single shell to control them all
  • 11 Simple Ways To Recover Your Screen on Linux and Unix
  • Bash efficiency formula
  • NVidia Fan Speed Revisited
  • Ubucleaner - Simple bash script to keep your Ubuntu System Clean
  • Find out number of IP’s connected to the system
  • Script for deleting users (follow up for creating user)

AOL Goes Open Source The most old-school Web media brand is set to embrace an open source, Web 2.0 approach in a major way.

Also: opens its home page, but does anyone care?

Intel joins Taiwan on Linux OS for netbooks

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Linux (IDG): Intel and the Taiwan government plan to open a development center to further the Linux-based Moblin OS for devices such as netbooks and mobile Internet devices (MIDs), they jointly announced on Thursday.

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More in Tux Machines

ARTIK is the Tizen’s Trojan Horse to dominate the IoT ecosystem

As part of the Forum “Tizen for the Internet of Things” held on September 22 in Moscow, Samsung Electronics has presented a new family of maker boards and modules named ARTIK, in addition to the infrastructure of the operating system Tizen 3.0. Samsung ARTIK’s value proposition, as declared by Samsung, is to reinvent the prototyping process by leveraging world-class data security granted by the company as well as a wide array of tools, both hardware and software, such as the ARTIK Modules and Cloud, formerly known as SmartThings Open Cloud. Read more

today's leftovers

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

  • Google Pixel review: The best Android phone, even if it is a little pricey
    Welcome to the age of Google Hardware. Apparently tired of letting third-party Android OEMs serve as the stewards of Android handsets, Google has become a hardware company. (Again). Earlier this year Google, launched a hardware division with former Motorola President Rick Osterloh at the helm. With the high-ranking title of "Senior Vice President," Osterloh doesn't oversee a side project—his group is on even footing with Android, Search, YouTube, and Ads. The hardware group is so powerful inside Google that it was able to merge Nexus, Pixel, Chromecast, OnHub, ATAP, and Glass into a single business unit. The group's coming out party was October 4, 2016, where it announced Google Home, Google Wifi, a 4K Chromecast, the Daydream VR headset, and the pair of phones we're looking at today: the Google Pixel and Google Pixel XL. The arrival of the Pixel phones marks the apparent death of the Nexus line; Google says that it has "no plans" for future Nexus devices. With the new branding comes a change in strategy, too. The Pixel brand is about making devices that are 100 percent Google, so despite Google's position as the developer of Android, get ready for Google-designed hardware combined with exclusive Google software.
  • Hands-on with the LeEco Le Pro3: services first, Android second
    LeEco’s flagship Le Pro3 smartphone isn’t trying to compete with the Google Pixel, which puts modern Google services in front of a stock Android backdrop. After playing with the Le Pro3 at the company’s U.S. launch event in San Francisco today, I’m left feeling that it’s an easy, low-cost way to get the full experience of LeEco’s applications. There are proprietary LeEco utility tools like the browser, email, calendar, messages, notes, and phone apps, along with bloatware like Yahoo Weather, but mostly the Pro3 is a means of distribution for the LeEco apps, like Live, LeVidi, and Le. There is also a standard-issue My LeEco app for managing services like EcoPass membership. Under it all is the EUI custom user interface. If you swipe left from the home screen, you see videos that LeEco recommends you watch — not Google Now.
  • Report: Google reaches agreement with CBS for 'Unplugged' web TV service - Fox and Disney may follow