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Monday, 16 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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browsing in GNOME

Filed under
Software

blogs.gnome.org: There are 2 ways to provide access to the web for GNOME. One is to integrate into an existing framework. The other is to write our own.

KDE 4.2.1 provides the "Cream" on top of KDE

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: It has been a little more than a month since you were able to install the latest and greatest KDE on release day. Today is another one of those with KDE 4.2.1 (codenamed "Cream") hitting the shelves.

Looking back at Linux.com

Filed under
Linux
Web

brucebyfield.wordpress: Quite simply, the old Linux.com site and its sister-site NewsForge were the largest source of original news in the FOSS community. That is not just bias, but objective fact. Mny people don’t seem to recognize what’s been lost.

Also: Journey to the New Linux.com

Bad update! BAD!

Filed under
SUSE

marcelgagne.com: On Monday evening, just before calling it a night, I decided to attend to that little 'updates available my OpenSUSE 11.1 notebook. There were half a dozen updates, one of them being a kernel update, which doesn't happen too often.

Firefox 3 Gains Ground on Microsoft Internet Explorer

Filed under
Moz/FF

sys-con.com: Mozilla Firefox 3 overtook Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 6 for the first time in February in the Internet browser wars according to monthly data from StatCounter Global Stats.

Red Hat's JBoss Software Draws Patent Suit

Filed under
Legal

informationweek.com: A small software company on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against open source distributor Red Hat and several vendors that sell Red Hat products, claiming that Red Hat's JBoss middleware violates one of its patents.

The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 2: Installation

Filed under
Linux

maximumpc.com: In part one of our guide, we walked you through the process of finding a distro that is right for you. This chapter is going to walk you through downloading and burning a CD image of your chosen distro(s), the traditional way of partitioning and setting up a dual-boot system, and another way to dual-boot without repartitioning.

Dream Linux 3.5 - An Excellent New Release

Filed under
Linux

community.zdnet/blog: I got interested in the new release of Dream Linux (3.5) because it is supposed to make it easy to create your own customised ISO boot image. I thought that if I could get it set up and configured on the HP 2133, and then make an ISO of that, that would be really useful.

Open Source, it is not just for Linux anymore

linuxjournal.com: I was involved in an email discussion the other day with a fellow Amateur Radio operator about a program called UI-View. I was informed that the source code had been destroyed on the author’s death, at his request. This made me pause.

HOW TO: choose the best version of Linux

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: What's the best Linux distribution? It's one of the most commonly asked questions from people who are new to Linux. The answer? Well, there isn't really a simple answer.

Quick look around XFCE 4.6

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: I went for lightweight and speedy. That meant, of course, Arch, but also ext4 and the latest XFCE. Yes, XFCE isn’t the lightest solution I could have gone for. It’s no awesome, or evilwm, or even Openbox, but I was curious about the new 4.6 release, and I wanted to keep things relatively easy.

4 Great Tools to Find Files Quickly

Filed under
Software

gaarai.com: As is true with most things in Linux, there are great desktop tools, but more power can be found in Terminal than any streamlined desktop tool can match. Today, I’d like to introduce you to a few tools.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • For Fans of Drupal, a time to meet and talk code

  • HAL: new keys to match kernel version
  • Tempers Flare as Recession Creeps into Tech Industry
  • 15 Years Linux: Past and Future
  • More on Open Source Conversion Rate Myths
  • Open Source Media Center Apps Are Growing Up
  • Comux 001010
  • Linux stack and tools vendor launches community site
  • End of life for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1
  • Rule #3: Divide and conquer
  • Take Me Out to Ubuntu
  • The SFLS: Episode 0x08: Selecting a FLOSS License
  • openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 61
  • Asking the wrong questions on open-source adoption
  • Asus Eee brings in anorexic computing
  • Mozilla Developer New 03/03
  • Time for open source to loosen up
  • Open Sources Episode 6: Open source in the enterprise
  • ZYpp 6.2.1, no mirror will stop you
  • Hive Five Winner for Best Home Server Software: Ubuntu Server Edition
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 1 Episode 3

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Vim Cheatsheet Revisited

  • Boosting your Kernel on Gentoo
  • Playing Restricted Media When Using Ubuntu
  • Opera add / increase the number of speed dials (9.x and 10)
  • Boost Your Disk Performance by Using Journal Data Writeback Mode of Ext3
  • VirtualBox, Virtual Networking
  • Flegita: Gnome Scan - A Simple Scanning Alternative to XSane
  • StarCraft on Linux
  • My code is compiling
  • The Ultimate Guide To Manage Your Audio/Video Files In Linux

Evidence-Based Open Source Adoption

Filed under
OSS

informationweek.com: I mentioned to a friend of mine the other day how I was replacing Word with OpenOffice in the long run. He replied that they use OO exclusively at his place of work.

Microsoft to Release Windows Linux!

Filed under
Humor

linugadgetech.blogspot: I was looking today at the packaging of my new Sabrent 3.5" internal card reader and noticed something very interesting on the front of the box. Do you see what I see? That's right, it lists Windows Linux.

Red Hat and Novell: Heading In Opposite Directions?

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: When Red Hat announces quarterly results March 25, the news may confirm what Wall Street has suspected since November 2008: Despite Novell’s continued momentum with SUSE Linux, the smarter money remains on Red Hat’s open source strategy. Here’s why:

Inside the Linux Foundation Purchase of Linux.com

Filed under
Linux
Web

earthweb.com: Two months after SourceForge’s Linux.com site stopped publishing new stories, the reason has finally been made public: The site has been acquired by the Linux Foundation.

linux too f*@King easy to install

Filed under
Linux

noronha.id.au: Ok I have a computer it generally stays on 24/7. it does important work like download files during off-peak download periods. It also is my svn server. samba etc… Ok so the short of the story is my computer got reformatted.

Tell Them It’s Linux!!

Filed under
Linux

danlynch.org/blog: I saw an interesting video a few days ago. I found it amusing that most people thought KDE 4 was Windows 7 but hardly that surprising if I’m honest. But as I watched one thought screamed louder and louder inside my head, “for god’s sake tell them it’s Linux!!!”.

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More in Tux Machines

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Project launches updated Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 with bug fixes
    An updated version of Debian, a popular Linux distribution is now available for users to download and install. According to the post on the Debian website by Debian Project, the new version is 8.7. This is the seventh update to the Debian eight distribution, and the update primarily focuses on fixing bugs and security problems. This update also includes some adjustments to fix serious problems present in the previous version.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2016
    The number of sponsored hours did not increase but a new silver sponsor is in the process of joining. We are only missing another silver sponsor (or two to four bronze sponsors) to reach our objective of funding the equivalent of a full time position.
  • APK, images and other stuff.
    Also, I was pleased to see F-droid Verification Server as a sign of F-droid progress on reproducible builds effort - I hope these changes to diffoscope will help them!
  • Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Gets a Beta Release, Ships with KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS
    After landing on the official download channels a few days ago, the Beta version of the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Edition operating system got today, January 16, 2017, an official announcement. The KDE Edition is the last in the new Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" stable series to be published, and it was delayed a little bit because Clement Lefebvre and his team wanted it to ship with latest KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment from the Kubuntu Backports PPA repository.
  • Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 — Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu In One ISO
    Linux AIO is a multiboot ISO carrying different flavors of a single Linux distribution and eases you from the pain of keeping different bootable USBs. The latest Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 is now available for download in both 64-bit and 32-bit versions. It features various Ubuntu flavors including Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu.

Top Ubuntu Editing Apps: Image, Audio, Video

It's been my experience that most people aren't aware of the scope of creative software available for Ubuntu. The reason for this is complicated, but I suspect it mostly comes down to the functional availability provided by each application title for the Linux desktop. In this article, I'm going to give you an introduction to some of the best creative software applications for Ubuntu (and other Linux distros). Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Google's open-source Draco promises to squeeze richer 3D worlds into the web, gaming, and VR
    Google has published a set of open source libraries that should improve the storage and transmission of 3D graphics, which could help deliver more detailed 3D apps.
  • Why every business should consider an open source point of sale system
    Point of sale (POS) systems have come a long way from the days of simple cash registers that rang up purchases. Today, POS systems can be all-in-one solutions that include payment processing, inventory management, marketing tools, and more. Retailers can receive daily reports on their cash flow and labor costs, often from a mobile device. The POS is the lifeblood of a business, and that means you need to choose one carefully. There are a ton of options out there, but if you want to save money, adapt to changing business needs, and keep up with technological advances, you would be wise to consider an open source system. An open source POS, where the source code is exposed for your use, offers significant advantages over a proprietary system that keeps its code rigidly under wraps.
  • Can academic faculty members teach with Wikipedia?
    Since 2010, 29,000 students have completed the Wiki Ed program. They have added 25 million words to Wikipedia, or the equivalent of 85,000 printed pages of content. This is 66% of the total words in the last print edition of Encyclopedia Britannica. When Wiki Ed students are most active, they are contributing 10% of all the content being added to underdeveloped, academic content areas on Wikipedia.
  • AMD HSA IL / BRIG Front-End Still Hoping To Get Into GCC 7
    For many months now there's been work on an AMD HSA IL front-end for GCC with supporting the BRIG binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). It's getting late into GCC 7 development and onwards to its final development stage while this new front-end has yet to be merged. Developer Pekka Jääskeläinen has been trying to get in the finishing reviews and changes for getting approval to land this BRIG front-end into the GNU Compiler Collection. It's a big addition and with GCC 7 soon just focusing on wrong-code fixes, bug fixes, and documentation fixes starting on 19 January, there would be just a few days left to land this new front-end for GCC 7 to avoid having to wait until next year for it to debut in stable with GCC 8.
  • Rcpp 0.12.9: Next round
    Yesterday afternoon, the nineth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp made it to the CRAN network for GNU R. Windows binaries have by now been generated; and the package was updated in Debian too. This 0.12.9 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, and the 0.12.8 release in November --- making it the thirteenth release at the steady bi-montly release frequency. Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing GNU R with C or C++ code. As of today, 906 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further. That is up by sixthythree packages over the two months since the last release -- or about a package a day!