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Wednesday, 07 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story For Better and for Worse, Chromebooks Have Become PCs Roy Schestowitz 07/05/2014 - 9:03am
Story Radeon: Mesa 10.1 vs. Mesa Git On Ubuntu 14.04 Rianne Schestowitz 07/05/2014 - 8:34am
Story Linux Care, Testing, and Feeding Rianne Schestowitz 07/05/2014 - 4:30am
Story Stop Complaining, Gedit Is Better Than Ever Rianne Schestowitz 07/05/2014 - 1:18am
Story Chromebook space heating up: Asus launches two models Rianne Schestowitz 07/05/2014 - 1:11am
Story Google and Intel team up to give Chromebooks more power Rianne Schestowitz 07/05/2014 - 1:02am
Story AMD surprise: pin-compatible ARM and x86 CPUs Rianne Schestowitz 07/05/2014 - 12:55am
Story Easily Fix Firefox 29 Rianne Schestowitz 07/05/2014 - 12:47am
Story Why ARM Servers, And Why Now? Rianne Schestowitz 07/05/2014 - 12:41am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 06/05/2014 - 8:28pm

The Netbook Experience Is A Little Less Shiny Right Now

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Caitlyn Martin: During the holidays I received some Hanukkah gelt from family specifically earmarked for buying myself a new computer. I ordered the one that seemed to give me the most power for the least money in a very small and lightweight case: a Sylvania g Netbook.

Linux-based HP Mini Mi ships with command line disabled

Filed under
Linux

arstechnica.com: Yesterday, while looking through the Comdex news feeds, I stumbled across a Mini Mi 1000 HP product announcement from HP. What caught my eye on the product page wasn't the description of the GUI, it was what followed on the next line. Preceded by "Please note" in bold, the HP page states "the Linux command line interface is disabled on this edition."

Biting into the Linux Sandwich of 2009

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: I wrote last year about how 2008 would be the ‘Year of Non-desktop Linux’. As we embark on 2009, I have a similar view, but in keeping with all of the turkey and ham and leftovers from the holidays and to present a more appetizing analogy, I envision the ‘2009 Linux Sandwich.’

Did Vietnam take open source too far?

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: It’s what every red-blooded capitalist with a Microsoft button most fears, and rails against here and elsewhere, especially when we talk about open source in the developing world. Mandate open source?

Ways YOU can contribute to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

meandubuntu.wordpress: I thought I might make a list of ways to contribute to Ubuntu (or Linux in general), and provide my thoughts on them. I’ve tried to list them in rough order of “difficulty”, from easy to hard, where difficulty means how much effort it takes.

ViewSonic is even jumping into netbook game

Filed under
Hardware

blogs.zdnet.com: Is there anyone NOT making netbooks these days? ViewSonic, best known for making monitors, digital picture frames and projectors, has hopped into the netbook game, launching the VieBook.

Pixel’s departure from Mandriva

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva: Pixel will be leaving Mandriva on February. We would like to take the opportunity to thank him for his commitment and endeavour whilst at Mandriva and we wish him every success in his future activities.

The 2008 Linux and free software timeline

Filed under
OSS

lwn.net: 2008 proved to be an interesting year, with great progress in useful software that made our systems better. Of course, there were some of the usual conflicts. Here is LWN's eleventh annual timeline of significant events in the Linux and free software world for the year.

A New, Easy To Use Disk Formatter For GNOME

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: GParted is not exactly the ideal program for new Linux users to familiarize themselves with if all they want to do is format a USB drive or external storage device. Fortunately, a new GNOME utility has come about that is designed to be simple yet powerful.

Review: OpenSuSE 11.1

Filed under
SUSE

vwbusguy.wordpress: I am a fan of the gnome desktop. I respect KDE, but don’t use it, and to be fair didn’t try the KDE version of openSuSE. Since OpenSuSE ships gnome 2.24, I had assumed my UI experience would be somewhat similar.

16 Free Games - Part 3

Filed under
Gaming

pcmech.com: Didn’t get enough games in part 2? Here are some more!

Turn Your Ubuntu Intrepid Into Mac OSX Leopard

Filed under
Ubuntu

maketecheasier.com: This is an updated version of my previous post Turn Ubuntu Hardy into Mac OSX. That post was written six months ago and many things have changed during this period of time.

OpenOffice.org vs. Go-OO: Cutting through the Gordian Knot

Filed under
OOo

earthweb.com: Is OpenOffice.org (OOo), the popular free office application, "a profoundly sick project," as developer Michael Meeks alleges? Or are his comments a poorly concealed effort to promote Go-OO, Novell's version of OOo, as the anti-Novell lobby suggests?

Help On The Way: Five Great Linux Support Sites

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com: Linux support and documentation sites are a dime a dozen -- and some aren't worth much more than that. Here are a few sites that really give you your money's worth . . . or at least they would, if most of the content wasn't already free.

Artwork for Ubuntu Jaunty Already Impressive

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Artwork for Ubuntu Jaunty Already Impressive

  • Jaunty Jackalope - New Volume Control Applet

Goodbye openSUSE. Hello Linux Mint.

Filed under
Linux

alternativenayk.wordpress: Enough is enough. After numerous attempts to get openSUSE 11.1 working, including many many reinstalls, I finally erased everything in favour of Linux Mint 6 (Felicia… whatever that means!).

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Turn Your Linux Desktop into an Alarm Clock

  • Navigate on Linux command shell history
  • A gentle introduction to video encoding, part 4: captioning
  • How To Create Your Own IRC Chat Channel
  • Linux CLI (Command Line Interface) Tricks
  • The CentOS Test
  • Linux netbooks to hit the UK highstreet
  • Dell Mini 9 gets 64GB SSD option for Linux
  • EMTEC to Reveal Gdium Mobile Netbook at CES
  • rm -rf /
  • Migration Assistant In Ubuntu 9.04
  • OpenSuse 11.1 Day 3 Disaster
  • An Update on OpenSUSE 11.1
  • Interview With Pat Tiernan of Climate Savers Computing
  • Red Hat, Ingres Put Twist On LAMP Developer Stack
  • Mot taps Linux for rugged mobile phone
  • Packaging Quality
  • Linux breadboard targets wireless geo-location
  • Funtoo and Sunrise
  • Why Desktop Linux Holds Its Own Against OS X

Using the Broadcom proprietary wireless driver on Mandriva Linux 2009

Filed under
Hardware
MDV

HappyAssassin.net has a guide to using the Broadcom proprietary wireless driver on Mandriva Linux 2009. It's easier to set up and performs better than the native 'b43' driver, or using ndiswrapper.

NLnet to fund AbiWord OpenDocument improvements

Filed under
OSS

uwog.net: As some of you might know, some of the AbiWord developers started a company called AbiSource Corporation a few months back. Today NLnet agreed to fund AbiSource Corporation (still need to sign the papers) to work on resolving the OpenDocument issue list, which is awesome!

OLPC Just Got Gutted, 50% Staff Gone!

Filed under
OLPC

olpcnews.com: The official OLPC blog so innocently says that One Laptop Per Child is "Refocusing our mission" with an email from Nicholas Negroponte that clearly shows that the OLPC organization is really being gutted.

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Getting started with Raspberry Pi

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    More and more AAA games are coming to our beloved Linux platform, and nothing makes us happier than to see Daedalic Entertainment's Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun title launching today on Steam for Linux, Mac, and Windows. If you're not familiar with Daedalic Entertainment's work, they are the creators of the superb and fun Deponia series, but Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun is something different, a tactical stealth-strategy game in the style of the Commandos stealth-oriented real-time tactics video game series.
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    The Keeper side-scrolling survival action game full of boss battles, a combo system for combat and a day and night cycle will come to Linux.
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  • Dawn of War II has a minor patch to fix a few issues
  • Khronos are working on an open standard for VR, Valve will use it
  • BOOR, a new puzzle platformer will arrive with Linux support next year
    BOOR [Official Site] is a new puzzle platformer from developer Dazlog Studio and publisher BadLand Games that will have Linux support. We have many puzzle platformers now, so I do hope BOOR has something to set itself apart from the rest of them. I haven't seen anything in the trailer or the feature list that really jumps out at me. I am hoping when they reveal more gameplay it will look more enticing.
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High School's Help Desk Teaches Open Source IT Skills

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What’s New with Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8?

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