Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

How to run a successful Linux User Group

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: If there was one thing Linux Format magazine learned from the Readers' Round Table event it organised, it was that us Linux folk like to get out and have a good chat.

How To Run Fully-Virtualized Guests (HVM) With Xen 3.2 On Debian Lenny (x86_64)

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can set up fully-virtualized guests (HVM) with Xen 3.2 on a Debian Lenny x86_64 host system. HVM stands for HardwareVirtualMachine; to set up such guests, you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization (Intel VT or AMD-V).

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Fedora 11 preview

  • Become a Linux command line black-belt
  • FLOSS Weekly 59: TuxPaint
  • 5 Minutes of World of Goo
  • PAM hell starts to freeze
  • Bandits: Phoenix Rising Finally Gets A New Beta
  • What the *, Firefox?
  • Drupalcon: Drupal Adds Install Tools, Support
  • Tykes Need Linux Too
  • NVIDIA Releases 180.37 Linux Display Driver

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu Tweak 0.4.6

  • Analyzing boot performance of OpenSuse 11.1 with bootchart
  • How to Tunnel Web Traffic with SSH Secure Shell
  • Howto Setup Wireless on a Fujitsu Siemens Li 2727 notebook
  • Debian Lenny Minimal Desktop
  • How to use a WiFi interface
  • Debugging Wifi on Ubuntu Linux
  • Ubuntu-Change Icon Size
  • Lenny Laptop: Wifi Setup

Improved Linux Screen Space Management With PekWM

Filed under
Software

oreilly.com: With the growing popularity of netbooks more and more people are using small screens which support lower resolutions. The challenge for those who do a great deal of multitasking and tend to have lots of windows open is finding a good way to manage them on a small screen.

Why Do You Use Linux?

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: At some point, nearly everyone who uses Linux has someone ask them “what’s that?” This question almost invariably leads to “why is it better than <other operating system>?” What do you say?

In defence of Ubuntu against old school hackers

Filed under
Ubuntu

seemanta.wordpress: I have been using Ubuntu since version 5.04 came out. And let me add, this is the damnest Linux distro out there today !! I was a Debian devotee but after 4 years of Ubuntu, now I am a born-again Ubuntu convert.

From the End of the Beginning to the Beginning of the End

Filed under
OSS

opensource.org: When Eric Raymond posted the first of the Halloween Documents in 1998, it marked the end of the beginning for open source. That is to say those documents demonstrated that the logical superiority of the open source development model had penetrated the most headstrong corporate skull in the proprietary software universe: Microsoft.

Ubuntu: Community for Human beings

Filed under
Ubuntu

doctormo.wordpress: The ubuntu community is one of the most enjoyable I’ve ever been a part of, it has a much more diverse set of people and ideas than other development communities, but retains a strict sense of community and togetherness.

Also: The ubuntuforums are ::evil::

Who should Software Freedom sue on FAT32?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
Legal

blogs.zdnet.com: Microsoft owns FAT32, but it didn’t appear to pursue its rights. Until the TomTom case. At which point Jeremy Allison of Samba says Microsoft had secret cross-licensing deals with all those other guys which violate the GPL. So who should Software Freedom sue?

Review of Exherbo Linux (From A User’s Perspective)

Filed under
Linux

halffull.org: Exherbo is a Linux distribution led by a small team of opinionated developers. It’s lean, to say the least, but when they give you a solution for something you can believe it’s well engineered and that it does that task well - nothing more.

Knoppix 6.0: Perfect Distro (also for Netbooks)

Filed under
Linux

linux-magazine.com: Knoppix has always been regarded as one of the most versatile Linux distros out there, but the latest version of the venerable Live CD Linux distribution has got yet another trick up its sleeve.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Transparent GTK Themes

  • How To Edit Your Screensaver Settings In Ubuntu Intrepid
  • Automate Linux with Cron and Anacron
  • How to install curl for PHP5 under Ubuntu/Debian
  • HOWTO : Convert existing ext3 to ext4

sidux 2008-04 Pontos - Not for the faint-hearted

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Some time ago, a fellow user in one of the forums suggested I try sidux. Why I asked? Well, he said, sidux is Debian-based, it's light, stable and fast. After reading online a bit, I found overall positive impressions, I decided to follow suit and test sidux.

Resurrect your old PC

Filed under
Linux
Software

tuxradar.com: Rather than throw old hardware away because it can't cope with Vista's bloat, we show you how to put it to good use - read on to learn how to transform your old computer into a mail server, a fileserver, a web server, a spam blocker, a PC for kids and more!

QEMU 0.10.0 Release To Bring Many Features

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: QEMU, the popular open-source processor emulator that can be run as a user-space program and also has found its way into use by the KVM and VirtualBox projects, will soon reach version 0.10.0

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • You Can Now Play UT3 On Linux, Sort Of

  • Ubuntu Netbook Remix and Debian Lenny on the Samsung NC10
  • Jaunty Alpha 5 Ramblings
  • Is Open Source Ready To Get The Message?
  • 10 Gnome Action Movies
  • When purists become pragmatists
  • Power Management: ATI Catalyst vs. Open-Source ATI Driver
  • Application Installing (II)
  • math: Windows 7 + netbook = failure - GNU/Linux as remaining winner!
  • New CEO, New Drupal CMS Offerings for Acquia
  • Michael Jackson using Drupal
  • Nokia puts out help wanted sign on Qt
  • Linux loses more netbook market share
  • Do Open Source Eyeballs Really Work?
  • Tightening purse strings will turn many businesses on to Open Source Software
  • When open source moves from evangelism to implementation
  • Cisco's PostPath to Linux powered hosted email
  • Worker: new version on 10th anniversary
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2009.03.06
  • User Friendly Comic Strip
  • Sacred Gold On Linux Has Gone Gold
  • SCO files appeal in dispute over computer code
  • Free Video Editors for Ubuntu
  • FOSS Debates, Part 1: Kernel Truths

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • KDE 4.2 on Gentoo - Part 1: The Preparation

  • How to Install KDE 4.2 on Ubuntu 8.10
  • From Chapter Four: The Unix and Open source Culture
  • Remove duplicate files
  • Encrypted Debian Live USB key
  • Cork Board With The GIMP
  • Plain Authentication for sendmail with SASL
  • Save time with Gedit snippets
  • Virtual Hosting in Sendmail
  • How To Transfer Files Easily Among Linux Machines
  • Vim: master the basics
  • 6 Ways To Connect Linux to the Outside World That Are Not Wireless, Bluetooth, or Ethernet
  • HowTo force remote devices (routers/switches) to refresh their arp cache entry for a machine

Amarok vs Songbird

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Most migrants from other operating systems will seek out a Linux alternative to the ubiquitous iTunes, and chances are they'll come across Amarok 2.0 and Songbird 1.0. Which one is right for you?

Linux : the cool factor - part 2

Filed under
Linux

handlewithlinux.com: Last time I mentioned compiz, which gave very different responses. Some people think it's great others hate it. Today I'll throw in something completely different.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

This Script Updates Hosts Files Using a Multi-Source Unified Block List With Whitelisting

If you ever tinker with your hosts file, you should try running this script to automatically keep the file updated with the latest known ad servers, phishing sites and other web scum.

Read more

via DMT/Linux Blog

today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 417: OpenHMD
    Fredrik Hultin is the Co-founder of the OpenHMD project (together with Jakob Bornecrantz). OpenHMD aims to provide a Free and Open Source API and drivers for immersive technology, such as head-mounted displays with built-in head tracking. The project's aim is to implement support for as many devices as possible in a portable, cross-platform package.
  • My next EP will be released as a corrupted GPT image
    Endless OS is distributed as a compressed disk image, so you just write it to disk to install it. On first boot, it resizes itself to fill the whole disk. So, to “install” it to a file we decompress the image file, then extend it to the desired length. When booting, in principle we want to loopback-mount the image file and treat that as the root device. But there’s a problem: NTFS-3G, the most mature NTFS implementation for Linux, runs in userspace using FUSE. There are some practical problems arranging for the userspace processes to survive the transition out of the initramfs, but the bigger problem is that accessing a loopback-mounted image on an NTFS partition is slow, presumably because every disk access has an extra round-trip to userspace and back. Is there some way we can avoid this performance penalty?
  • This week in GTK+ – 31
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 52 commits, with 10254 lines added and 9466 lines removed.
  • Digest of Fedora 25 Reviews
    Fedora 25 has been out for 2 months and it seems like a very solid release, maybe the best in the history of the distro. And feedback from the press and users has also been very positive.
  • Monday's security updates
  • What does security and USB-C have in common?
    I've decided to create yet another security analogy! You can’t tell, but I’m very excited to do this. One of my long standing complaints about security is there are basically no good analogies that make sense. We always try to talk about auto safety, or food safety, or maybe building security, how about pollution. There’s always some sort of existing real world scenario we try warp and twist in a way so we can tell a security story that makes sense. So far they’ve all failed. The analogy always starts out strong, then something happens that makes everything fall apart. I imagine a big part of this is because security is really new, but it’s also really hard to understand. It’s just not something humans are good at understanding. [...] The TL;DR is essentially the world of USB-C cables is sort of a modern day wild west. There’s no way to really tell which ones are good and which ones are bad, so there are some people who test the cables. It’s nothing official, they’re basically volunteers doing this in their free time. Their feedback is literally the only real way to decide which cables are good and which are bad. That’s sort of crazy if you think about it.
  • NuTyX 8.2.93 released
  • Linux Top 3: Parted Magic, Quirky and Ultimate Edition
    Parted Magic is a very niche Linux distribution that many users first discover when they're trying to either re-partition a drive or recover data from an older system. The new Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release is an incremental update that follows the very large 2016_10_18 update that provided 800 updates.
  • How To Use Google Translate From Commandline In Linux
  • How to debug C programs in Linux using gdb
  • Use Docker remotely on Atomic Host
  • Ubuntu isn’t the only version of Linux that can run on Windows 10
  • OpenSUSE Linux lands on Windows 10
  • How to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 on Windows 10

Leftovers: Software and Games

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.