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About Tux Machines

Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2015 - 10:50pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2015 - 10:48pm
Story Open Access (Textbooks/Commons) Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2015 - 8:01pm
Story Linux Devices Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2015 - 7:58pm
Story Lawyers Versus FOSS Licensing Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2015 - 7:56pm
Story Announced at LinuxCon Europe 2015 Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2015 - 7:54pm
Story A Few Worrisome Regressions Appear In Ubuntu 15.04 vs. 15.10 Performance Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2015 - 7:53pm
Story Leftovers: KDE Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2015 - 7:50pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2015 - 4:22pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2015 - 4:19pm

London Stock Exchange hires 81 C++ developers for delayed Linux system

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: The London Stock Exchange has hired 81 open source software staff for the development of the delayed Linux-based system being implemented on its cash markets.

Pardus

Filed under
Linux

asinen.org: I recently decided to try out a few other distros rather than just install Fedora that I’ve been using for a number of years. I’ll spare you the details of those that didn’t make the cut and move on to the distro from which I am currently typing this, Pardus 2009.

Announcing Bodhi Linux

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: You may have noticed the blog has been rather quiet the last couple of weeks, this is because I have been working on a project. Last month I posted details about an E17 LiveDVD I was working on that was modeled after PinguyOS.

Fragmentation and What it Means

Filed under
OS
Software

redmonk.com: “Building web apps is not getting easier. The fragmentation of operating systems and browsers is getting worse, not better.” With a few caveats, the above statement is obviously true.

The State of Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • The State of Mozilla
  • Mozilla millions still 86% Google cash

No Maverick PPA For Unity

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • No Maverick PPA For Unity
  • OpenRespect: It's About Time
  • French Gendarmerie switch 85,000 PC’s to Ubuntu
  • Slew of New Business Tools Coming to Ubuntu

Big Xbox is watching you

Filed under
Gaming
  • Big Xbox is watching you
  • LGP Has Been Down For A Month And A Half
  • Pacmanic - Pacman Clone in 3D
  • Kristanix Games Ported To GNU/Linux
  • CodeWeavers Crossover Come To The Light Sale

Microsoft: "Linux at the End of its Life Cycle"

Filed under
Linux

opendotdotdot.blogspot: Regular readers of this blog will know that I've tracked the rather painful history of attempts to increase the deployment of free software in Russia, notably in its schools. Well, that saga continues, it seems, with doubts being expressed about the creation of a Russian national operating system based on GNU/Linux:

Benchmarks Of Debian Etch, Lenny & Squeeze

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: With Debian 6.0 "Squeeze" set to be released in the coming months, we have decided to run a set of benchmarks looking at the performance of Debian 6.0 across different sub-systems relative to the performance of Debian 5.0 "Lenny" and Debian 4.0 "Etch" to see how this new release may stack up.

GNOME 2.32.1 released

Filed under
Software

gnome.org: The first update to GNOME 2.32 (and my own first release) is now available. It provides bug fixes, translation updates and the usual care and kindness that our brave GNOME developers and contributors deserves to details.

Dirty PCs: How much filth can you take?

Filed under
Hardware
Humor

theregister.co.uk: It's been a tad over a year since our shock insight into the darkest and most fearsome interiors of computing hardware, and by our reckoning that's just about enough time to recover from the trauma.

Health Check: openSUSE (Community before code)

Filed under
SUSE

h-online.com: The openSUSE community is on a voyage of introspection and self discovery. SuSE Linux has been around in one form or another since 1992, and, with the possible exception of Slackware, has an older provenance than any other Linux distribution, yet openSUSE is still in search of a unifying vision that sets it apart from its rivals and its past.

Could the Windows Comparison Game Hurt Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

linuxinsider.com: "Ah yes, the old old, OLD story," said Hyperlogos blogger Martin Espinoza. "This argument has only been going on since Linux has been suitable for real work and will probably keep going so long as people are paying for both of them. It matters if you're trying to sell Linux in a world dominated by Microsoft. Otherwise, not so much."

AniWeather, Display Weather Conditions In Firefox

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF

ghacks.net: What’s the weather like today? If you want to answer that question you will have to either find it out by yourself, for instance by stepping outside, by asking other people or with the help of weather reports.

Embarrassed to recommend Microsoft

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

zdnet.co.uk/blogs: A few times in the past I've been caught recommending Microsoft products, only to have it come back and bite me when things don't work properly.

Living with Ubuntu:

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Living with Linux: installing and using Ubuntu Netbook Edition
  • Ubuntu To Introduce Its Own Monospace Font
  • Multi-touch in Ubuntu using Kinect [video, ppa]

The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 10 (Julia)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 10 (Julia) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 10 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 10.10 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Back In Time, a Free and Simple Backup Software
  • 7 Brilliant GNOME GTK Themes
  • I Hate Thunderbird 3.x
  • Test-driving Bordeaux 2.0.8
  • Top 20 Open Source Packages
  • Clam AntiVirus management tools
  • KMyMoney 4.5.1 stable version is out
  • A Linux server OS that's had 11 years to improve
  • Linux servers for Windows folk: go on, give it a bash
  • Linux Box Goes Live With Email
  • Context Toolbars in The Board
  • Polishing KGet and Friends
  • New: OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 Release Candidate 5
  • New: OOo-DEV 3.x Developer Snapshot
  • LCDTV.net - New Online Magazine Using Drupal 6
  • Linux 2.6.37-rc2 Kernel Released; So Far Looks Painless
  • AMD Catalyst 10.11 Linux Driver Released
  • Hard Lessons Learned: Malicious Ads on SourceForge
  • New Opera address field, mouse gestures, and updated mail panel and extensions
  • Linux distros advance on the networking front
  • FLOSS Weekly 142: CentOS

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • The mystery behind LUN (Logical Unit Number)
  • Easy Samba Sharing Setup with KDE
  • How to Choose a Partition Scheme for Your Linux PC
  • BTTB: looping for shell script under embedded linux
  • Change Bootsplash In Fedora 14
  • How to change network card speed and duplex settings in ubuntu
  • Apache, Authentication and MySQL
  • Convert DEB to RPM (RPM to DEB) Package Using Alien Command
  • Easily Find Subtitles for Any Video with Periscope
  • Install Galaxy Live Wallpaper Compiz Plugin On Ubuntu 10.10
  • Resize, Rename and Convert Images on Linux - EasyImageSizer
  • Using Variables With awk
  • Which Linux® or UNIX® Version Am I Running?

11 OSes that Tried (and failed) to Take Down Windows

Filed under
OS

maximumpc.com: Believe it or not, Microsoft’s Windows is 25 years old - which is certianly making some of us feel old. Despite a few ups and downs, growing pains, and BSODs, Windows has survived the test of time and continues to reign as one of the most popular operating systems available today. Of course that’s not to say there haven’t been other operating systems over the years that tried to steal the crown.

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More in Tux Machines

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.
  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics
    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image. In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.