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Tuesday, 03 Mar 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux developers sign a petition rejecting the current draft of GPLv3

Filed under
OSS

Nothing has created furore more than the GPL version 3 which is still in the draft stage. The Free Software Foundation's move to create a separate version of GPL taking corrective measures to guard against DRM has not been well received by the core group of Linux developers which includes Linus Torvalds.

NVIDIA 1.0-9625 Display Drivers

Filed under
Software

Two days after delivering our NVIDIA 1.0-9XXX Series Preview, NVIDIA has shocked the alternative OS community by not only delivering a Beta candidate for the Linux display drivers but also for Solaris and FreeBSD! While our preview featured many of the same changes found in this release, today at Phoronix we have all of the details on this 1.0-9625 Beta.

Alan Cox's ThinkPad battery explodes

Filed under
Misc

It appears that the exploding IBM ThinkPad that we spotted last week at LAX may not have been a fluke after all. Telsa Gwynne, wife of famed Linux kernel programmer Alan Cox, describes on her website how her husband's ThinkPad battery suddenly exploded last night.

Linux: Looking At 2.6.19, No Reiser4 yet

Filed under
Linux

Andrew Morton posted his patch queue with numerous comments about merge plans into the mainline kernel. Among his comments he noted that he would not yet be merging the Reiser4 filesystem, "reiser4. I was planning on merging this, but the batch_write/writev problemight wreck things, and I don't think the patches arising from my recent partial review have come through yet. So it's looking more like 2.6.20."

Red Flag Linux may be next on IBM's agenda

Filed under
Linux

The next Linux distribution that IBM throws its weight behind is likely to be China's Red Flag Linux, suggesting that for businesses elsewhere in the world the Linux market will remain a two-horse race for the time being.

32 bits are better than 64

Filed under
SUSE

RECENT TESTS conducted using a Small Business Transaction Benchmark from Neal Nelson showed that a 32-bit version of Suse Linux Enterprise Server 10 provided up to 37 percent more throughput than a 64-bit version.

Should Shuttleworth Address United Nations?

Filed under
Misc

Mark Shuttleworth should sell the idea of non-patentable shared "open energy technology" to world leaders as its potential to have a profound impact on the reduction of the greenhouse gases is enormous.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Beta 1: Look but Don't Touch

Filed under
Reviews

The features Red Hat says will be in RHEL 5 sound great, but the promise was hard to prove in tests because of some system flakiness and omissions.

Quick guide to get a girlfriend using Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos
Humor

This guide is pretty straightforward. No introductions, lectures or philosophing about love. Follow it from beginning to end, and you might get a woman today!

Create training videos with pyvnc2swf

Filed under
HowTos

How many times has someone verbally explained how to do something on a computer to you? How many times do you end up asking them to just show you? For these situations there is pyvnc2swf, a program that turns screen input into video files. Let's see just how easy it is to use it to producing training videos.

OpenOffice bundles Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

Future versions of OpenOffice.org will come bundled with Mozilla's Thunderbird email client and Lightning calendar application.

How to change your login screen in Ubuntu/Gnome

Filed under
HowTos

I don’t know why but the phrase eye-candy always makes me think of accidentally getting pixie stick contents blown into my eye. Ouch! Anyway, here’s another eye-candy (wipes tears away) trick for your box. Say you want to change your login screen. You’re tired of the brown look, or the defaults just aren’t cutting it for you. Well there’s a simple way to do this.

Is Linux vs. Windows a Religious Decision?

Filed under
Linux

Dick Federle is a highly experienced IT systems manager and architect, having designed and supervised many custom development jobs. Along the way, Federle has noticed an odd phenomenon in the world of IT. He’s seen many managers make one of their most critical decisions – whether to opt for Windows or for Linux – on strictly personal grounds.

Kubuntu not quite right for a Tablet PC

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux is known for running well (or at least running) on older hardware and exotic platforms. I attempted to install Kubuntu Dapper Drake (6.10) on a Compaq TC1000 Tablet PC. I discovered that while Linux may install on nearly every platform, and run faster than its proprietary competition, it may not always be the best-fitting choice for every environment.

Use the source, Luke?

Filed under
Gentoo

I love Gentoo, I also hate it with a vengeance. I’m not talking small time peeves here, like the way Krispy Kremes icing gets all over your fingers (and by extension, clothes). I’m talking the type of frustration that is expressed in multitudes of expletives, some of which would make the profinsaurus cry.

Virtually Speaking: Simplifying the Infrastructure

Filed under
Software

There are many well-documented advantages to virtualization. Now that the technology is deployed throughout the data center, the disadvantages are starting to surface. One such disadvantage is rising complexity.

Book Review: SELinux by Example

Filed under
Reviews

SELinux (Security Enhanced Linux) has been talked about for quite a while and been written about for almost as long. What is surprising is that there has never really been a book written that functions as a hands-on guide for its implementation in the real world. This despite the fact that it is supported in Red Hat, Debian, Gentoo, and others. SELinux by Example fills that void and does so admirably.

Nano editor tutorials

Filed under
HowTos

nano is a small, free and friendly editor which aims to replace Pico,the default editor included in the non-free Pine package. Rather than just copying Pico’s look and feel, nano also implements some missing (or disabled by default) features in Pico, such as “search and replace” and “go to line number”.

Integration of dbus and KDE: starting and stopping the session part of dbus with KDM

Filed under
HowTos

Since some time now a lot of applications make use of D-BUS. This is the case with KDE 3.5, the current stable release of KDE. With the upcomming KDE 4, D-BUS is getting more important, replacing DCOP. In this howto I want to describe a way to start and stop the user and session dependent part of dbus.

Python slithers to 'significant' release

Filed under
Software

The open source community this week hailed the most significant update to Python in five years. Python 2.5 contains major improvements in reliability, performance and efficiency, according to release manager Anthony Baxter.

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