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Friday, 21 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu 14.04 beta 1 offers a sneak peek at 'Trusty Tahr' Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 6:05pm
Story How to get a side launcher like Ubuntu on your Android device Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 6:02pm
Story Wine Announcement Rianne Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 2:12pm
Story Linux Kernel Patching Gets Dynamic Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 9:53am
Story Why your virtualization should be open-source Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 9:50am
Story Interesting facts about Raspberry Pi Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 8:54am
Story 30-Way Graphics Card Comparison On Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 8:52am
Story Simplicity Linux 14.1 - A fresh take on Puppy Linux Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 8:44am
Story Distros Compared, Free Ed, and Making Money Rianne Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 7:44am
Story Radeon Open-Source Performance Over Three Years, Compared To Legacy Catalyst Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 7:41am

Michael Crichton, million-selling science-fiction author, dies at 66

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Obits Best-selling author Michael Crichton, who wrote such novels as "The Andromeda Strain" and "Jurassic Park," and created the popular TV drama "ER," has died at 66, his family said today.

Distro Review: Mandriva One 2009

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adventuresinopensource.blogspot: I've started distro hopping again on my main machine (Dell M1330 laptop) to keep me on my toes and my first stop on the tour was Mandriva One 2009. I had great things to say about the 2008 release and I was eager to see how the new version would measure up.

some howtos & such

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  • Trying out SimplifyMedia on Debian

  • Ubuntu: How to Share Files With Mac OS X via Netatalk
  • HowTo setup vacation using postfix on Debian Etch
  • 25 Useful Ubuntu Shortcuts To Make your Life Easier
  • Tip: Getting Your Webcam To Work In Ubuntu
  • Automating with Cron - Using the Cron Folders
  • Using openSUSE zypper for package management

Listen to your music anywhere with Subsonic

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Software If your music library is tied to your CD collection or MP3 player, you can still hit the road without losing access to your tunes. Subsonic is a free, Web-based media streamer that lets you -- and your friends -- access your music collection over the Internet.

Songbird 1.0 Poised to Rule the Jukebox Roost

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Software The first release candidate for Songbird 1.0 is now available and contains all the features slated for the final release. Songbird, which is a free, open source media player built on the same technologies underlying Firefox, is just about ready to take on iTunes.

Meet Firefox 3.1 new tab preview panel

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Moz/FF Today’s nightly features the long ago announced tab preview panel that replaces the All tabs list it used to feature in the far right side.

Ubuntu's Intrepid Ibex: Usability is Hard to Do

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Ubuntu Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu's dictator-for-life, has been discussing usability in public and on his blog for the last six months. Ubuntu 8.10 – a.k.a. Intrepid Ibex -- is the first effort towards fulfilling this ambition. But, if anything, the release suggests that the goal may take a bit longer than anyone hopes.

I didn't know you could do that in Linux!

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Linux Here are 12 tips, tricks, tweaks and techniques to make you say "I didn't know you could do that in Linux." Sure, not every one may be your cup of tea but here are 12 items to help you have the most positive Linux experience you can.

11 Prime Features of openSUSE 11.1 - A Comprehensive Review

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blog.taragana: Open Suse is coming out with their new version of 11.1 and we are at it. openSUSE 11.1 beta 4 is just released, while the official launch of the final version is on 18 December, 2008. We took a detailed look into openSUSE 11.1 beta 4 and here are the gems we found.

Early Look at Firefox's Private Browsing Mode

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Moz/FF Firefox users have long had the capability to surf the web without leaving any cookies, URL history, or other identifying marks, given add-ons like Stealther and many others. In the next upgrade to the open-source browser, 3.1, the browser itself will offer a "Private Browsing" mode for anything you don't want shown to anyone else on your system—you know, like gift ideas!

Enabling Compiz Fusion On An Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop (NVIDIA GeForce FX 5200)

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This tutorial shows how you can enable Compiz Fusion on an Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) desktop (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card - I am using an NVIDIA GeForce FX 5200 here). With Compiz Fusion you can use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube on your desktop.

9 Reasons why I found Ubuntu 8.10 disappointing

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Ubuntu I installed Ubuntu 8.10 64-bit edition. And now I regret it. here’s something seriously wrong with my wireless driver. PulseAudio is more broken than before!

openSUSE 11.1's New Partitioning Module

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SUSE openSUSE 11.1 is moving ever closer to its December release date. One of the changes long time openSUSE users will notice right away is the new YaST disk partitioner.

ASRock G43Twins-FullHD

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Hardware One of the motherboards to use Intel's G43 is the ASRock G43Twins-FullHD, which we happen to be looking at today. This motherboard that pairs the Intel G43 with an ICH10 Southbridge supports both DDR2 and DDR3 system memory and its video connectors include D-Sub, DVI-D, and DisplayPort.

Dillo 2.0 is fast, but limited

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Software The lightweight Dillo Web browser, in development for eight years, has always been a contender for the fastest browser available on GNU/Linux -- so much so that the Google's Chrome will have to be pretty nimble to outpace it. With last month's release of version 2.0, Dillo is faster than ever.

Review: CentOS 5.2

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Linux This month’s Linux Format Magazine came with CentOS 5.2 on the disc. CentOS, in case you don’t know, is a community supported version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. (RHEL) Again, in the unlikely case you don’t know - Red Hat is required to supply the source code to all GPL code it uses in RHEL. What they don’t have to do is supply the Source RPMs which make it extremely easy for a distro like CentOS to exist.

today's leftovers

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  • Debian discord over de-classified developer proposal

  • trunk/kdelibs/plasma/
  • Xandros Announces Broad Series of Cross-Platform Management Packs (PR)
  • Don't Fear Big-Box Linux Development
  • Mozilla Developer News Nov 04
  • Fedora 10 Linux previewed
  • Qt Creator, KDevelop
  • OpenSolaris Constitution: Updating v2
  • Ubuntu and Your Money
  • And people actually pay for this stuff?
  • Goodbye My Friend
  • Fl_TeacherTool: Award-winning software with an uncertain future
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Not End of Capitalism
  • If Windows is a dead end, what's next?
  • What Linux Needs To Win on Desktops

some howtos:

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  • Keep Track of Your Time with Hamster Applet

  • Super Grub Disk To The Rescue
  • List Open Files
  • Using dnsmasq for DNS and DHCP services
  • Recover Deleted Files From Your Linux System
  • Folding@Home on Ubuntu
  • conquer your file associations in kde
  • Recover grub bootloader with Vista, Xp and Linux
  • A Few Ways To Gauge Possible Memory Bottlenecks In SUSE Linux

Diebold faces GPL infringement lawsuit over voting machines

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Legal Artifex Software, the company behind the open source Ghostscript PDF processing software, has filed a lawsuit against voting machine vendor Diebold and its subsidiary Premier Election Solutions. Artifex says that Diebold violated the GPL by incorporating Ghostscript into commercial electronic voting machine systems.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 beta boosts virtualization capabilities

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Linux Raleigh, N.C.-based Red Hat Inc.has introduced the beta of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5.3, which includes improvements in virtualization, clustering and file systems, along with support for the latest hardware drivers.

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Blockchain and FOSS

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Celebrating 12 years of Ubuntu
    Founder Mark Shuttleworth announced the first public release of Ubuntu – version 4.10, or “Warty Warthog” – on Oct. 20, 2004. The idea behind what would become the most recognizable and widely used Linux distributions ever was simple – create a Linux operating system that anybody could use. Here’s a look back at Ubuntu’s history.
  • Happy 12th Birthday, Ubuntu!
    Yup, it’s twelve years to the day since Mark Shuttleworth sat down to tap out the first Ubuntu release announcement and herald in an era of “Linux for human beings”.
  • A Slice of Ubuntu
    The de facto standard for Raspberry Pi operating systems is Raspbian–a Debian based distribution specifically for the diminutive computer. Of course, you have multiple choices and there might not be one best choice for every situation. It did catch our eye, however, that the RaspEX project released a workable Ubunutu 16.10 release for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. RaspEX is a full Linux Desktop system with LXDE (a lightweight desktop environment) and many other useful programs. Firefox, Samba, and VNC4Server are present. You can use the Ubuntu repositories to install anything else you want. The system uses kernel 4.4.21. You can see a review of a much older version of RaspEX in the video below.
  • Download Ubuntu Yakkety Yak 16.10 wallpaper
    The Yakkety Yak 16.10 is released and now you can download the new wallpaper by clicking here. It’s the latest part of the set for the Ubuntu 2016 releases following Xenial Xerus. You can read about our wallpaper visual design process here.
  • Live kernel patching from Canonical now available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    We are delighted to announce the availability of a new service for Ubuntu which any user can enable on their current installations – the Canonical Livepatch Service. This new live kernel patching service can be used on any Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system (using the generic Linux 4.4 kernel) to minimise unplanned downtime and maintain the highest levels of security.
  • How to enable free 'Canonical Livepatch Service' for Linux kernel live-patching on Ubuntu
    Linux 4.0 introduced a wonderful feature for those that need insane up-time -- the ability to patch the kernel without rebooting the machine. While this is vital for servers, it can be beneficial to workstation users too. Believe it or not, some home users covet long up-time simply for fun -- bragging rights, and such. If you are an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS user (with generic Linux kernel 4.4) and you want to take advantage of this exciting feature, I have good news -- it is now conveniently available for free! Unfortunately, this all-new Canonical Livepatch Service does have a catch -- it is limited to three machines per user. Of course, home users can register as many email addresses as they want, so it is easy to get more if needed. Businesses can pay for additional machines through Ubuntu Advantage. Want to give it a go? Read on. "Since the release of the Linux 4.0 kernel about 18 months ago, users have been able to patch and update their kernel packages without rebooting. However, until now, no other Linux distribution has offered this feature for free to their users. That changes today with the release of the Canonical Livepatch Service", says Tom Callway, Director of Cloud Marketing, Canonical.
  • KernelCare Is Another Alternative To Canonical's Ubuntu Live Kernel Patching
    Earlier this week Canonical announced their Kernel Livepatching Service for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users. Canonical's service is free for under three systems while another alternative for Ubuntu Linux users interested in a commercial service is CloudLinux's KernelCare. The folks from CloudLinux wrote in to remind us of their kernel patching solution, which they've been offering since 2014 and believe is a superior solution to Canonical's service. KernelCare isn't limited to just Ubuntu 16.04 but also works with Ubuntu 14.04 and other distributions such as CentOS/RHEL, Debian, and other enterprise Linux distributions.

More Security News (and FUD)

Leftovers: Software

  • Easy, Automated Benchmarking On Linux With PTS
    It's easy to run benchmarks on Linux as well as Solaris, BSD, and other operating systems, using our own Phoronix Test Suite open-source benchmarking software. For those that haven't had the opportunity to play with the Phoronix Test Suite for Linux benchmarking, it's really easy to get started. Aside from the official documentation, which is admittedly limited due to time/resource constraints, there are a few independent guides, Wiki pages, and other resources out there to get started.
  • LibreOffice 5.3 Alpha Tagged, New Features Inbound
    The first alpha release of the upcoming LibreOffice 5.3 open-source office suite was tagged a short time ago in Git. LibreOffice 5.3 is a major update to this distant fork of LibreOffice 5.3.0 is planned to be officially released in late January or early February while this week's alpha one is just the first step of the process. The hard feature freeze on 5.3 is at the end of November followed by a series of betas and release candidates. Those interested in more details on the release schedule can see this Wiki page.
  • MPV 0.21 Player Adds CUDA, Better Raspberry Pi Support
    MPV Player 0.21 is now available as the latest version of this popular fork of MPlayer/MPlayer2. MPV 0.21 adds support for CUDA and NVDEC (NVIDIA Decode) as an alternative to VDPAU. The NVIDIA decode support using CUDA was added to make up for VDPAU's current lack of HEVC Main 10 profile support. Those unfamiliar with NVDEC can see NVIDIA's documentation.
  • MPV 0.21.0 Media Player Adds Nvidia CUDA Support, Raspberry Pi Hardware Decoding
    Today, October 20, 2016, MPV developer Martin Herkt proudly announced the release of another maintenance update of the very popular MPV open-source and cross-platform media player software based on MPlayer. Looking at the release notes, which we've also attached at the end of the story for your reading pleasure, MPV 0.21.0 is a major update that adds a large amount of new features, options and commands, but also addresses dozens of bugs reported by users since the MPV 0.20.0 release, and introduces other minor enhancements. Among the most important new features, we can mention the ability to allow profile forward-references in the default profile, as well as support for Nvidia CUDA and cuvid/NvDecode, which appears to be a welcome addition to GNU/Linux distributions where HEVC Main 10 support is missing.
  • anytime 0.0.4: New features and fixes
    A brand-new release of anytime is now on CRAN following the three earlier releases since mid-September. anytime aims to convert anything in integer, numeric, character, factor, ordered, ... format to POSIXct (or Date) objects -- and does so without requiring a format string. See the anytime page for a few examples.