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Wednesday, 20 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Top 5 Image Viewers for Ubuntu/Kubuntu

Filed under
Reviews

This article overviews five image viewers available for Ubuntu and also includes at the end a list of another five ones which either are no longer maintained or are based on older libraries (KDE3 for example).

My kind of rewards card

Filed under
Linux
OSS

openattitude.com: Though I probably don’t need another credit card, this one’s a little different. Instead of racking up points for me, my new MasterCard sends a portion of each and every purchase I make directly to The Linux Fund — supporting projects…

Raleigh, NC—the world's first open source city

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Linux
OSS

opensource.com: I started pondering what qualities would define an open source city a few months ago when my friend Tom Rabon mentioned it to me one day. I was curious how the city I live in, Raleigh, NC, could attract other open source companies and be the world's hub for open source and a leader in open government. How could Raleigh be the open source capital of the world, similar to what Silicon Valley is to technology and Paris is to romance?

An Open Letter to the Libre Office Design Team

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LibO

thelinuxbox.org: Libre Office is one of the most exciting forks currently in the open source world. I believe that statement so strongly that I have even put my money where my mouth is and financially contributed to this project. That said, I'm concerned they are preparing to perpetuate the same errors that OOo was making.

Also: LibreOffice Pips OpenOffice.org To The Post: Review

Quick Look at Exaile & Installation in Ubuntu and Debian

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Reviews

Exaile is a pretty decent music player for GNOME written in PyGTK which comes with features like tabbed playlists, lyrics fetching, radio support, file browser, support for dynamic and smart playlists, cover support, 10-band equalizer and more. The latest version was released a few days ago and comes with several bug fixes and minor issue fixes.

Multi-Core, Multi-OS Scaling Performance

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Hardware

phoronix.com: In this article we are looking at how Linux, OpenSolaris, and FreeBSD scale across multiple cores. Benchmarked are CentOS 5.5, Fedora 14, PC-BSD/FreeBSD 8.1, and OpenIndiana b148 as we see how the performance differs when running on one, two, three, four, and six cores, plus when Intel Hyper Threading is enabled.

5 Best Linux Distribution With No Proprietary Components

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Linux
OSS

cyberciti.biz: Linux is a free and open source operating system. However, Linux (and other open source operating system) can use and load device drivers without publicly available source code. In this post I will list five best Linux distribution that meets the FSF's strict guidelines and contains no proprietary components such as firmware and drivers.

Debian 6: First Impressions

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Linux

linux-mag.com: Did Debian have a contest to redesign its graphics and it wasn’t made public? Did a third grader win that contest? Oh, the hallowed Debian developers must have had a fashion faux pas moment when deciding on a new look because this one makes me think it was designed for children or by children.

XFCE 4.8 Desktop Environment

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Software

linuxjournal.com: Although often classed as light-weight, XFCE qualifies as a medium weight amongst the Linux front ends. It's heavier than, say, LXDE or Window Maker but it uses less resources than KDE or Gnome. However, it is a desktop environment rather than simply a window manager, and as such, it comes with a set of associated utilities.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 393

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Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: Introducing Debian GNU/Linux 6.0
  • News: Fedora announces graphics test day, openSUSE drops Unity from 11.4, OpenBSD developer's fund raising story
  • Questions and answers: Using noexec to prevent social engineering attacks
  • Released last week: Ubuntu 10.04.2, Tiny Core Linux 3.5, Pardus Linux 2 "Corporate"
  • Upcoming releases: FreeBSD 8.2, PC-BSD 8.2, openSUSE 11.4 RC2
  • New additions: Mageia

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

20 New User Misconceptions about Linux

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Linux

earthweb.com: The misconception that one OS acts just like another makes me crazy. It's like me going from a Toyota Prius to a sixteen wheeler "big rig" and expecting it to handle exactly the same.

A 3G-capable, Linux powered computer…in your car’s dashboard?

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Linux

thenextweb.com: I might have found the right answer in the Navisurfer II. It is a full-blown Linux-based computer, with touchscreen monitor and 3G HSDPA modem all built in. Oh, and as the name implies, it also has a built-in GPS receiver with the Navit navigation system.

LibreOffice the last word in open source software

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LibO

theaustralian.com.au: WHY do so many people and businesses keep buying Microsoft Office at about $200 for home users and $379 for businesses when there are good substitutes that cost zilch, or a only small fee?

Debian 6: Have your Debian and eat your Ubuntu too

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Linux

theregister.co.uk: A new version of Debian was once cause for celebration in Linux circles - no doubt it still is in some quarters. Debian's offspring Ubuntu, though, has managed to steal much of the thunder lately.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • QEMU 0.14 Improves Linux Virtualization
  • Software Center adds ‘inappropriate rating’ link, and more
  • CeBIT in Germany: the trade show I hate to love
  • Packman service interruption and migration
  • Intel to preview Poulson processor
  • Firefox 4 Final Beta Delayed – March Release Appears Likely
  • Firefox 4 beta 12 delayed, beta 13 possible
  • Replay Great Old Games on Dosbox
  • Going Linux Feb 20: #130 - Synergy 1.4.2 for Linux
  • Linux Action Show s15e07: Ubuntu vs Banshee

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Syncing Kontact with Android
  • How to use rsync to copy files, folders and backup in Linux
  • Drupal 6.2 or 7 with Hiawatha 7.4 WebServer on Ubuntu
  • Change The Firefox Default Zoom Level
  • Auto-change Ubuntu background according to weather
  • Get your USB drives to work with VirtualBox, Ubuntu Host
  • Hidden Linux: cat, less, tac and shuf
  • Installing openSUSE 11.4 GNOME Live CD Step by Step

A quick look to 5 Linux Games

Filed under
Gaming

linuxaria.com: Sometimes I like to look at what offers the open source world on the games side, today I want to introduce three little-known games that run on our beloved penguin.

ArchBang 2010.09 vs 2011.02 - What's Changed?

Filed under
Linux

all-things-linux.blogspot: ArchBang is a spin, or custom install media, based on Arch Linux and is inspired by CrunchBang, which is currently based on Debian stable. As such both are using the Openbox window manager, and ArchBang seems to follow closely looks wise and in choice of applications.

22 Linux Icon Sets that are Great

Filed under
Software

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Once of the best things about FOSS is the amount of customization it allows for! So why leave your Linux desktop bland with the default icon set that comes with your distribution? There are many good icon sets out there. Rest Here

Installing Apache2 With PHP5 And MySQL Support On Debian Squeeze (LAMP)

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HowTos

LAMP is short for Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP. This tutorial shows how you can install an Apache2 webserver on a Debian Squeeze server with PHP5 support (mod_php) and MySQL support.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

Open Hardware: Good for Your Brand, Good for Your Bottom Line

Chip makers are starting to catch on to the advantages of open, however. SiFive has released an entirely open RISC-V development board. Its campaign on the Crowd Supply crowd-funding website very quickly raised more than $140,000 USD. The board itself is hailed as a game-changer in the world of hardware. Developments like these will ensure that it won't be long before the hardware equivalent of LEGO's bricks will soon be as open as the designs built using them. Read more