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Saturday, 17 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Single Cinder Vulnerability Fixed in Ubuntu 15.04 Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2015 - 7:03pm
Story Plasma 5.3.2 and Frameworks 5.12.0 Backported to Kubuntu 15.04 Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2015 - 7:00pm
Story Tizen Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2015 - 6:37pm
Story Manjaro Gets LibreOffice 5.0 and Linux Kernel 4.2 RC5 Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2015 - 12:14pm
Story ExTix 15.3 Is Ubuntu 15.04 Stripped of Unity and with LXQt Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2015 - 12:12pm
Story Nantes: “Change management key to switch to free software" Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2015 - 12:09pm
Story Apple’s Android apps move is likely a desperate attempt to sell more Apple Watches Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2015 - 10:33am
Story Ubuntu lets you buy Aquarius E5 no matter where you live Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2015 - 10:31am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2015 - 10:30am
Story Leftovers: GNOME Software Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2015 - 10:21am

Lightweight Distro Roundup: Day 4 – Sabayon Five-Oh LXDE

Filed under
Linux

g33q.co.za: Today we give Sabayon Five-Oh a run. Three of the four distros we reviewed this week have been using LXDE as its desktop environment.

Oracle vs Google: Triple Damage

Filed under
OSS
  • Oracle vs Google: Triple Damage!
  • Oracle loses another DTrace creator
  • The OpenSolaris-Based Nexenta Core Platform 3.0 Released

0 A.D. Releases Alpha Build, Launches PPA

Filed under
Gaming

workswithu.com: The dreams of Ubuntu users looking for commercial-quality games that run natively on Linux came a little closer to fulfillment this week, as the open-source project 0 A.D. pushed out its first alpha release.

Two Distributions Celebrate Birthdays

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: The Linux community had two birthdays to celebrate recently. Debian GNU/Linux turned 17 on August 16 and openSUSE has been providing an excellent desktop Linux for five years.

GNOME 2.32 Beta 1 Is Here

Filed under
Software

softpedia.com: The first beta of the upcoming GNOME 2.32 has landed to give early adopters, distro builders, developers and generally curious people a taste of things to come.

Are we being too hard on Adobe?

Filed under
Software

shanefagan.com: The perception is that every company can do what Google does and open source everything they can and even go as far as to buy other companies to open source their products.

Installing A Multiserver Setup With Dedicated Web, Email, DNS And MySQL Database Servers On Debian 5.0 With ISPConfig 3

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HowTos

This tutorial describes the installation of an ISPConfig 3 multiserver setup with dedicated web, email, database and two DNS servers all managed trough a single ISPConfig 3 control panel. The setup described below uses five servers and can be extended easily to to a higher number of servers by just adding more servers. E.g. if you want to have two mailservers, do the setup steps from chapter 2 on both of these servers. If you want to set up more web servers, then install ISPConfig on all other web servers in expert mode except of the first one.

Fedora 14 Alpha is go

Filed under
Linux

paul.frields.org: As John posted last night, Fedora 14 Alpha was declared ready for release next week. Although there was a one-week slip to handle the fact that our blocker list wasn’t clear, Fedora developers and testers in the community have worked hard together both to resolve the remaining issues and make sure that our Alpha would pass the release criteria.

Arch Linux – Minimal, Lightweight, Flexible & Easy to Use

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Linux

pcsplace.com: Arch Linux is a lightweight, flexible and simple Linux Distribution which is targeted at competent GNU/Linux users. Its Development focuses on a balance of minimalism, elegance, code correctness and modernity. It provides a minimal environment upon installation, (no GUI), already compiled and optimized for i686/x86-64 architectures.

The KDE 4.5 Notification Area

Filed under
KDE

ghacks.net: With KDE 4.5 came a lot of updates and changes. From the bottom to the top, nothing was immune from an update or two. One tool that received a nice overhaul is the Notification Area.

Illumos begins diverging from OpenSolaris

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OS

h-online.com: According to Garret D'Amore, Illumos project leader, the recently launched derivative is beginning to diverge from OpenSolaris.

Peppermint Ice review

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Linux

linuxuser.co.uk: Does Peppermint Ice, the new cloud-oriented desktop distro, have what it takes to do for desktops what Jolicloud and Google Chrome OS are doing for netbooks?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Debian Project News
  • Emacs undo trees
  • Untangle Gateway- An open source solution for blocking
  • Be A Community Manager
  • Novell and Markus Rex: Reinventing An Empire
  • Open Source Contributor Agreements: Some Examples
  • Open source and Windows 8: spotlight on Microsoft’s open source interop strategy
  • Improve artwork openSUSE 11.4
  • ATI's 2D Performance With X.Org Server 1.9
  • Open-source cuts through intell community's red tape
  • European Open Source Think Tank 2010:
  • Reflective compiz panels
  • The popularity of Firefox around the world
  • SFLS: Episode 0x2D:Updated Discussion
  • Linux Outlaws 163 - The Frostbite Empire

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Sudo without Passwords
  • Backup your Linux machine the smart way
  • Mount Any Archive File In Two Clicks
  • Enable SSL on Apache-2.2
  • 2 Ways to Add Swap Space Using dd, mkswap and swapon
  • How to Create a Family Friendly Ubuntu Setup
  • Multiple IP address in Unbutu
  • How to free Linux Kernel page cache and/or inode and dentry caches
  • Install and configure MailWatch monitoring tool for MailScanner
  • nethogs - Net top tool grouping bandwidth per process
  • verify and compare two directories differences
  • How to Install KDE 4.5

OpenOffice by the book

Filed under
OOo

mybroadband.co.za: South African organisation Translate.org.za is best known for its work translating open source software into indigenous South African languages. Now, in addition to translating the software into additional languages, Translate.org.za has also released a book on using OpenOffice.org effectively.

working upstream

Filed under
Software

vizzzion.org/blog: I read an interview with Canonical’s Jono Bacon. The definition Jono handles of upstream development is quite different from how it works for me. I can speak of personal and professional experience in this context

10 things you can do to keep your new Linux users from bailing on you

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Linux

techrepublic.com: Before you hand off Linux machines to users who are new to the operating system, do a little prep work to ease the transition and make sure they have the tools they need.

Ubuntu 10.04.1 LTS released

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 10.04.1 LTS released
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Codename "Natty Narwhal" Release Schedule
  • Reasons to Love Ubuntu

Where do Debian Developers Come From?

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Christian Perrier has published the results of his analysis of the number of Debian developers per country.

When open source sells out.

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: I just read a rather alarming article claiming that Oracle aims to destroy open source software industry. This article is in the tone of chicken little. As in the sky is falling and all is doom and gloom. It is written in such a way to ring every alarm bell it can find. It is, I believe, on the border of FUD.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • MX Linux Review of MX-17 – For The Record
    MX Linux Review of MX-17. MX-17 is a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS Linux communities. It’s XFCE based, lightning fast, comes with both 32 and 64-bit CPU support…and the tools. Oh man, the tools available in this distro are both reminders of Mepis past and current tech found in modern distros.
  • Samsung Halts Android 8.0 Oreo Rollouts for Galaxy S8 Due to Unexpected Reboots
    Samsung stopped the distribution of the Android 8.0 Oreo operating system update for its Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones due to unexpected reboots reported by several users. SamMobile reported the other day that Samsung halted all Android 8.0 Oreo rollouts for its Galaxy S8/S8+ series of Android smartphones after approximately a week since the initial release. But only today Samsung published a statement to inform user why it stopped the rollouts, and the cause appears to be related to a limited number of cases of unexpected reboots after installing the update.
  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Kevin Tian
    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.
  • Initial Intel Icelake Support Lands In Mesa OpenGL Driver, Vulkan Support Started
    A few days back I reported on Intel Icelake patches for the i965 Mesa driver in bringing up the OpenGL support now that several kernel patch series have been published for enabling these "Gen 11" graphics within the Direct Rendering Manager driver. This Icelake support has been quick to materialize even with Cannonlake hardware not yet being available.
  • LunarG's Vulkan Layer Factory Aims To Make Writing Vulkan Layers Easier
    Introduced as part of LunarG's recent Vulkan SDK update is the VLF, the Vulkan Layer Factory. The Vulkan Layer Factory aims to creating Vulkan layers easier by taking care of a lot of the boilerplate code for dealing with the initialization, etc. This framework also provides for "interceptor objects" for overriding functions pre/post API calls for Vulkan entry points of interest.

Logstash 6.2.0 Released, Alfresco Grabbed by Private Equity Firm

  • Logstash 6.2.0 Release Improves Open Source Data Processing Pipeline
    The "L" in the ELK stack gets updated with new features including advanced security capabilities. Many modern enterprises have adopted the ELK (Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana) stack to collect, process, search and visualize data. At the core of the ELK stack is the open-source Logstash project which defines itself as a server-side data processing pipeline - basically it helps to collect logs and then send them to a users' "stash" for searching, which in many cases is Elasticsearch.
  • Alfresco Software acquired by Private Equity Firm
    Enterprise apps company taken private in a deal that won't see a change in corporate direction. Alfresco has been developing its suite of Enterprise Content Management (ECM) and Business Process Management (BPM) technology since the company was founded back in June of 2005. On Feb. 8, Alfresco announced that it was being acquired by private equity firm Thomas H. Lee Partners (THL). Financial terms of the deal are not being publicly disclosed.

Servers and GPUs: Theano, DevOps, Kubernetes, AWS

  • Open Source Blockchain Computer Theano
    TigoCTM CEO Cindy Zimmerman says “we are excited to begin manufacturing our secure, private and open source desktops at our factory in the Panama Pacifico special economic zone. This is the first step towards a full line of secure, blockchain-powered hardware including desktops, servers, laptops, tablets, teller machines, and smartphones.” [...] Every component of each TigoCTM device is exhaustively researched and selected for its security profile based especially on open source hardware, firmware, and software. In addition, devices will run the GuldOS operating system, and open source applications like the Bitcoin, Ethereum and Dash blockchains. This fully auditable stack is ideal for use in enterprise signing environments such as banks and investment funds.
  • Enterprises identify 10 essential tools for DevOps [Ed: "Source code repository" and other old things co-opted to promote the stupid buzzword "devops"]
    Products branded with DevOps are everywhere, and the list of options grows every day, but the best DevOps tools are already well-known among enterprise IT pros.
  • The 4 Major Tenets of Kubernetes Security
    We look at security from the perspective of containers, Kubernetes deployment itself and network security. Such a holistic approach is needed to ensure that containers are deployed securely and that the attack surface is minimized. The best practices that arise from each of the above tenets apply to any Kubernetes deployment, whether you’re self-hosting a cluster or employing a managed service. We should note that there are related security controls outside of Kubernetes, such as the Secure Software Development Life Cycle (S-SDLC) or security monitoring, that can help reduce the likelihood of attacks and increase the defense posture. We strongly urge you to consider security across the entire application lifecycle rather than take a narrow focus on the deployment of containers with Kubernetes. However, for the sake of brevity, in this series, we will only cover security controls within the immediate Kubernetes environment.
  • GPUs on Google’s Kubernetes Engine are now available in open beta
    The Google Kubernetes Engine (previously known as the Google Container Engine and GKE) now allows all developers to attach Nvidia GPUs to their containers. GPUs on GKE (an acronym Google used to be quite fond of, but seems to be deemphasizing now) have been available in closed alpha for more than half a year. Now, however, this service is in beta and open to all developers who want to run machine learning applications or other workloads that could benefit from a GPU. As Google notes, the service offers access to both the Tesla P100 and K80 GPUs that are currently available on the Google Cloud Platform.
  • AWS lets users run SAP apps directly on SUSE Linux
  • SUSE collaborates with Amazon Web Services toaccelerate SAP migrations

Chrome and Firefox

  • The False Teeth of Chrome's Ad Filter.
    Today Google launched a new version of its Chrome browser with what they call an "ad filter"—which means that it sometimes blocks ads but is not an "ad blocker." EFF welcomes the elimination of the worst ad formats. But Google's approach here is a band-aid response to the crisis of trust in advertising that leaves massive user privacy issues unaddressed. Last year, a new industry organization, the Coalition for Better Ads, published user research investigating ad formats responsible for "bad ad experiences." The Coalition examined 55 ad formats, of which 12 were deemed unacceptable. These included various full page takeovers (prestitial, postitial, rollover), autoplay videos with sound, pop-ups of all types, and ad density of more than 35% on mobile. Google is supposed to check sites for the forbidden formats and give offenders 30 days to reform or have all their ads blocked in Chrome. Censured sites can purge the offending ads and request reexamination. [...] Some commentators have interpreted ad blocking as the "biggest boycott in history" against the abusive and intrusive nature of online advertising. Now the Coalition aims to slow the adoption of blockers by enacting minimal reforms. Pagefair, an adtech company that monitors adblocker use, estimates 600 million active users of blockers. Some see no ads at all, but most users of the two largest blockers, AdBlock and Adblock Plus, see ads "whitelisted" under the Acceptable Ads program. These companies leverage their position as gatekeepers to the user's eyeballs, obliging Google to buy back access to the "blocked" part of their user base through payments under Acceptable Ads. This is expensive (a German newspaper claims a figure as high as 25 million euros) and is viewed with disapproval by many advertisers and publishers.
  • Going Home
  • David Humphrey: Edge Cases
  • Experiments in productivity: the shared bug queue
    Over the next six months, Mozilla is planning to switch code review tools from mozreview/splinter to phabricator. Phabricator has more modern built-in tools like Herald that would have made setting up this shared queue a little easier, and that’s why I paused…briefly
  • Improving the web with small, composable tools
    Firefox Screenshots is the first Test Pilot experiment to graduate into Firefox, and it’s been surprisingly successful. You won’t see many people talking about it: it does what you expect, and it doesn’t cover new ground. Mozilla should do more of this.