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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 28 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mageia 4 Cinnamon, KDE and GNOME 3 screen shots Rianne Schestowitz 02/02/2014 - 3:55am
Story Enlightenment E19 Going Into Feature Freeze Soon Rianne Schestowitz 02/02/2014 - 1:09am
Story First Look at Maxthon Cloud Browser for Linux Rianne Schestowitz 01/02/2014 - 8:27pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 01/02/2014 - 6:56pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 01/02/2014 - 6:55pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 01/02/2014 - 6:53pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 01/02/2014 - 6:44pm
Blog entry Slight Site Changes Roy Schestowitz 01/02/2014 - 5:01pm
Story Smart Home Automation with Linux and Raspberry Pi Roy Schestowitz 01/02/2014 - 4:22pm
Story Who’s Writing Linux? Roy Schestowitz 01/02/2014 - 4:19pm

Opera maverick is still making waves

Filed under
Software

theinquirer.net: TRIVIA QUIZ: Which browser was the first to implement tabs, integrated search, zoom, saved sessions, and runs on mobile phones and TVs? Hint: it wasn't Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Chrome.

Red Hat tells Wall Street it wants Main Street

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Commercial Linux distributor Red Hat hosted its annual analyst day in New York today, and as Wall Street continues to hemorrhage, the company couldn't have picked a gloomier time for the occasion.

Hands on: How to get more from Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software

pcw.co.uk: Following the recent releases of two popular Linux distributions, Fedora 9 and Ubuntu 8.04 LTS, we are looking at a couple of additional pieces of software you might want to install onto a fresh installation of either.

Why Mono and Samba Are Patently Different

Filed under
Software

computerworlduk.com/blogs: To understand the principal difference between Samba and Mono, we need to explore what they do, and how they do it.

Open source in a time of recession

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet: No one questions the fact of recession any more, although we have yet to confirm a single quarter without growth, let alone two. Tech hates recessions, even though tech booms start at the bottom of them. Just as open source itself emerged from the wreckage of the dot bomb during, what — the early aughts?

Sidux grows on you

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Sidux, a relatively new desktop Linux distribution, is based on Sid, the unstable developmental branch of Debian. The developers strive for an easy-to-install and easy-to-use modern Debian derivative, and pride themselves on remaining true to the principles and values of the Debian project. Despite a few inconveniences, I like Sidux a bit more each time I use it.

Puppy Linux Live Trumps LinuxDefender In More Ways Than One

Filed under
Linux

linuxshellaccount.blogspot: More than a few people wrote in to let me know about other interesting "live" distro's of Linux after our post on using LinuxDefender Live CD to Fix NTFS problems ran.

Debian Project News - October 8th, 2008

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 12th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Some of the topics covered in this issue include: Bits from the DPL, What you can do for Lenny, and 500,000th bug reported.

10 questions to ask before migrating to Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: With the unsure economy and Microsoft Vista failing to gain overwhelming acceptance, many people are considering a migration to Linux. Although I find Linux to be far superior to Windows, certain criteria MUST be considered before making the switch.

Opera 9.60 released

Filed under
Software

Opera today released a new version of its desktop browser, Opera 9.60. Highlights include Feed preview, Speed enhancements, and Mail improvements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Torvalds talks about his brand new blog

  • Does Linux suck or is it lusers who suck? (netbook returns)
  • Biggest Enemy Of Linux Netbooks Isn't Windows - It's Expectations
  • Microsoft’s Cloud Computing: The Movie
  • Google is NOT your friend
  • New Linux Broadcom Wi-Fi drivers arrive
  • Quick Reviews: Linux, a n00b's POV
  • Opening Up ISO's Can of Worms
  • Wizbit: a Linux filesystem with distributed version control
  • How to Make a PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniMe Flash drive in Windows
  • Red Hat looks to mainstream markets for growth
  • Buddi - Personal budget software for Ubuntu Desktop
  • Open source does not mean 'open to pilfer trademarks,' suggests Google
  • NH Hoteles: Customers stay for less with open source
  • Open Source vs. Proprietary Intranet Software, Part 3
  • Ubuntu Podcast Episode#8
  • Mozilla Developer News 10/7
  • Red Hat To Adopt Qumranet Desktop Virtualization Products
  • Forget the damn netbooks. Can “Windows” replace Windows?

Linux distros lead jumps from Sun

theregister.co.uk: Sun Microsystems has lost a key individual responsible for getting its aspiring open-source software included in leading Linux distributions. Barton George has quit Sun after 13 years.

NPX-9000 UMPC is inexpensive but underpowered

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linux.com: The wave of cheap netbooks, mini laptops, or ultra-mobile PCs has crested with the cheapest yet, the NPX-9000 from Carapelli. Though it was announced in July with great fanfare at a price of £65 (or $110), it has yet to appear on the vendor's Web site. But we got our hands on one of the first units to escape from the factory and put it through its paces.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Forwarding Ports over an active SSH connection

  • How to: secure pronounceable passwords in Ubuntu with passook
  • Using the Linksys WUSB54GC (ralink rt73) Wireless usb adaptor in Linux
  • How to rip a dvd in Ubuntu (as .avi)
  • How to install and configure Rancid with Postfix on Debian

NVIDIA 177.80 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Over the course of the past few months we have seen several NVIDIA Linux drivers that have all been marked as beta with the last official release appearing in April. Today though NVIDIA has released the 177.80 Linux driver, which is an official update and christens the changes made with the 177.67, 177.68, 170.70, 177.76, and 177.78 beta drivers.

on Perl

Filed under
Software

matusiak.eu: I’ve written code in Bash, C, C++, Haskell, Java, Pascal, PHP, Python, Ruby. So I feel like I’ve been around the block a few times, as far as choosing a language. And yet, Perl leaves me bewildered.

Linux News Sites Web Traffic Slowdown: Is this for real?

Filed under
Linux
Web

junauza.com: As with the U.S. economy, it seems like the web traffic of several well-known Linux related news sites are slowing down. According to statistics from Alexa, famous sites like Slashdot, Linux.com, and Linux Journal among others have a sudden decrease in site visitors.

Compiz Killed My Video Card

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: Having recently installed a new version of Linux I thought I'd see how progress on Compiz, the compositing window manager, was going. And this is where it gets interesting.

Introducing Geode

Filed under
Moz/FF

labs.mozilla.com: You’ve arrived in a new city, and are looking for a good place to eat. You pull out your laptop, fire up Firefox, and go to your favorite review site. It automatically serves up some delicious suggestions. But first, your browser needs to know where you are. Introducing Geode.

Become a multimedia pro with the Vector Linux Multimedia Bonus Disc

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Many audio, video, and graphics professionals would like to make the switch to Linux, but don't want to deal with the hassle of figuring out multimedia on Linux or are scared off by the purported lack of such tools. I created Vector Linux Multimedia Bonus Disc (MMBD) to address this problem and perception.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • KDE Kirigami 1.1 UI Framework Released
  • [GNOME Maps:] Planning a trip
  • Etcher Image Writer Is Now Better Than Ever
    Back in may we spotlighted Etcher, a stylish open-source USB image writer app for Windows, macOS and Linux. In the months since our feature the app has released a over 10 small beta updates, with Etcher 1.5 Beta being the most recent release at the time of writing.
  • Audacious 3.8 released
    Audacious 3.8 was released on September 21, 2016.
  • New Version of Audacious Music Player Released
    A new version of Audacious, a popular lightweight audio player, is now available for download. Audacious 3.8 introduces a small set of features, including the ability to run more than one instance of the app at the same time. Quite why… no idea. New audtool commands have been added, including stream recording toggles, and cue sheet support is said to be “more seamless”.
  • Rambox Puts All Your Favorite Messaging Services In One App
    Rambox is a free, open-source messaging and email app that groups all your favourite web apps into one easy-to-manage window. Sound familiar? We’ve highlighted apps like Rambox before, with Franz and the Gmail-specific Wmail being but two.
  • Stylish Markdown Editor ‘Typora’ Is Now Available for Ubuntu
    In the market for a desktop markdown editor for Linux? You may have helped but notice that you’re rather spoilt for choice. From Abricotine and Scratch to Simplenote, Springseed and Remarkable. Even Gedit can render markdown with the right plugin! With so much choice it can be difficult to know which app to pick.
  • YoutPlayer Floats Your Fave YouTube Videos on The Desktop [Ed: just an Electron app]
    Looking for a neat-o way to play YouTube playlists on your desktop, outside your browser? Take a looksie at Yout, an Electron app that lets you add and watch YouTube playlists on your desktop, floating window stylee. Yout is not the most user-friendly of apps.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

  • Avoid the pile-up in 'Clustertruck', a first-person platformer with day-1 Linux support, it's great
    We have been steadily getting more 3D "beat the timer" games where you're up against others times, which is great because they really can be fun. I do love getting competitive in certain games, especially with some of my Steam friends and friends in the wider community. Games like this recently have been something I've been repeatedly going back to for a break from life. Clustertruck is not only about beating the times of other people, but it's also a "the floor is lava" game, so if you touch the floor you have to start again. The really funny thing is that the safe pads are moving trucks you have to keep up with. You can at least grab onto the back of a truck if you just about touch it, so it's not always instant death.
  • Fusion 3, the next generation game engine and editor from Clickteam will support Linux
    The difference between their tools and others, is the event system. Instead of needing to program every single line, you can stack up events and link them together to create a game. It works quite well and I'm pretty excited to give Fusion 3 a go on Linux myself to see what random games I can create for fun.