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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Will Linux power Amazon Drone and Google Robots? Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2013 - 9:24am
Story Why Isn't Open Source A Gateway For Coders Of Color? Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2013 - 9:21am
Story Secure communications service Perzo will be open source Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2013 - 9:13am
Story GCW-ZERO, the open source gaming console Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2013 - 9:03am
Story IBM will be bringing KVM Linux virtualization to Power in 2014 Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2013 - 8:36am
Story A Summer Spent on OpenPrinting with the Linux Foundation Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2013 - 8:33am
Story Linux users laugh at Microsoft's commitment to open source Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 9:13pm
Story Fedora 20 Ends Up With Yet Another Delay Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 8:56pm
Story Netrunner 13.12 RC available for testing Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 8:40pm
Story Linux Mint 16 OEM Has Been Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 8:27pm

Intrepid Feature Freeze this Thursday

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: This is a short, but pointed, reminder that Feature Freeze is scheduled for this Thursday, August 28.

TechieMoe tries Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate

Filed under
Microsoft

techiemoe.com: Microsoft's heir apparent has had its fair share of negative publicity since launch. In fact, I dare say it's had two or three operating systems' worth of negative publicity. Since the last versions of Vista I played with were a beta and a release candidate, I didn't really have an up-to-date opinion on the whole matter.

Opening minds to open source

Filed under
OSS

charlatan.ca: Anyone who has used the Internet has open-source licensing to thank. Programs licensed as open-source - like Apache, which retrieves and loads Internet pages - are maintained by an online community. Anyone can write new programming code to update or improve the software.

Ubuntu Keeps Building Momentum

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Many enthusiast PC sites create buying guides for people looking to build their own PC’s from components. For instance, The Tech Report released their latest system guide. For the first time they made a recommendation for a “mini-econobox” built around Intel’s Atom processor, and intended to be as small and quiet as possible. Their recommended OS for this machine?

Vulnerability in OpenOffice

Filed under
OOo

heise-online.co.uk: The current version of OpenOffice reportedly contains a security flaw that allows attackers to inject code into a system. The problem apparently only affects the 64-bit version of the office suite.

Intel acquires Linux distro developer

linuxdevices.com: "Poky Linux" and Matchbox developer OpenedHand announced that it has been acquired by Intel Corp. The U.K.-based embedded Linux services team will join the Intel Open Source Technology Center, and will focus on Moblin development for mobile Internet devices and other mobile devices.

Release Team Members Propose New Development Process

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: At Akademy 2008, KDE Release Team members Sebastian Kügler and Dirk Müller discussed the future of KDE's development process. Describing the challenges KDE faces and proposing some solutions, they spawned a lot of discussion.

Complete Kickstart: How to Save Time Installing Linux

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: If you have to perform a lot of Linux installs, there’s a fast and easy way to do so quickly and efficiently without having to babysit the installation process each time. By making use of Kickstart, you can save time and effort by setting up a Kickstart server and spend your time getting more useful work done.

Quebec sued for not considering open source. Why this is bad policy

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Facil, a Quebec-based open-source organization, has sued the Quebec provincial government for buying Microsoft software without considering open-source software, as CBC reports. The problem, it seems, is that Quebec has an "open markets" policy that it is supposed to follow.

Four Twitter clients for Linux

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Twitter is a social networking platform that keeps you in conversation by allowing you and your friends to follow each others' updates. The service lets users post and read 140-character updates, called tweets. I tested four Twitter clients for Linux on a desktop running Ubuntu Hardy Heron.

Brazil's love of Linux

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: Walk into the Ponto Frio electronics store here, which proudly displays a penguin-shaped logo, and you will find a healthy supply of Linux PCs alongside the usual Windows machines. The store's Linux love is indicative of Brazil's deep ties to open-source software.

Really free Linux takes hold

Filed under
Linux

weblog.infoworld: It's hardly news these days when RHEL or Suse Linux boots Windows or Unix off a server. But have you ever heard of a community version of the open source operating system displacing one of the popular commercial distributions?

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 36

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #36 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: Hack Week III, openSUSE Election Committee Founded, and openSUSE at Utah Open Source Conference.

10 terms to know before switching to linux

Filed under
Linux

When switching, or planning to switch to Linux, most people find it hard to understand the new or technical terms that come with using Linux. Here is a list of 10 terms you probably should know.

Open source: What you should learn from the French

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: A decade ago, European countries leapt out of the gate to take the lead in the radical open source movement -- none more so than France. Through policies and high-profile projects, the French Republic for years has been advocating for all open source all the time, in government and education. And France is not stopping:

IT veteran achieves perfect Zen through open source

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

independent.ie: Utah software company Novell employs 150 people in Dublin. The advent of open source software, particularly Linux, gave this long-standing IT giant a new lease of life. Ron Hovsepian is the company’s CEO.

Acer Aspire One Linux OS

Filed under
Linux

techtree.com: Last week we looked at one of the better Netbooks around - the Acer Aspire One. Today we'll look at the highly customized Operating System in the Aspire One, which claims to make Linux user-friendly for the common man.

10 things you didn’t know you could do in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntukungfu.org: Here are ten things that you (probably) didn’t know you could do in Ubuntu.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • MEPIS is coming back

  • Open source experts launch free advisory service
  • openSUSE: Unifying Progress During Installation
  • It’s Novell's Hack Week
  • Really Big Things
  • Vulnerabilities in LibTIFF
  • Successful Open Source Security Is Knowing What to Secure
  • Linux servers under the Phalanx gun: A problem with people, not code
  • Apple tried open source defence in ad case
  • The Apple v. Psystar Litigation
  • The Microsoft-Novell Deal and Trust in Princes
  • The problem with open-source revenue models
  • The Linux Foundation Announces End User Collaboration Summit
  • The Upside Down Of HTML On Unix and Linux: Backward
  • Linux distro: Anarchy
  • Why can't they fix the Flash/Firefox bug?
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More in Tux Machines

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers

FOSS and Linux Events

  • On speaking at community conferences
    Many people reading this have already suffered me talking to them about Prometheus. In personal conversation, or in the talks I gave at DebConf15 in Heidelberg, the Debian SunCamp in Lloret de Mar, BRMlab in Prague, and even at a talk on a different topic at the RABS in Cluj-Napoca.
  • TPM Microconference Accepted into LPC 2016
    Although trusted platform modules (TPMs) have been the subject of some controversy over the years, it is quite likely that they have important roles to play in preventing firmware-based attacks, protecting user keys, and so on. However, some work is required to enable TPMs to successfully play these roles, including getting TPM support into bootloaders, securely distributing known-good hashes, and providing robust and repeatable handling of upgrades. In short, given the ever-more-hostile environments that our systems must operate in, it seems quite likely that much help will be needed, including from TPMs. For more details, see the TPM Microconference wiki page.
  • More translations added to the SFD countdown
    Software Freedom Day is celebrated all around the world and as usual our community helps us to provide marketing materials in their specific languages. While the wiki is rather simple to translate, the Countdown remains a bit more complicated and time consuming to localize. One needs to edit the SVG file and generate roughly a 100 pictures, then upload them to the wiki. Still this doesn’t scare the SFD teams around the world and we are happy to announce three more languages are ready to be used: French, Chinese and German!

Second FreeBSD 11.0 Release Candidate Restores Support for 'nat global' in IPFW

Glen Barber from the FreeBSD project announced the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) development build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system. Read more