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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Windows wars? The Android and Chrome OS Alliance Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 11:43pm
Story Qt 5.3.1 Released Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 9:44pm
Story This is the Gear Live, Samsung's $199 Android Wear Smartwatch Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 9:41pm
Story Android TV hands-on: Google makes a new play for the living room Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 9:36pm
Story Linus Torvalds to developers: Make it personal Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 9:13pm
Story The OpenStack and Linux developer communities compared Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 8:33pm
Story Linux 3.16: Deadline I/O Scheduler Generally Leads With A SSD Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 6:25pm
Story 5 assistive technology open source programs Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 6:20pm
Story Automation controller taps Raspberry Pi Compute Module Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 6:13pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 4:30pm

How does Ubuntu's Upstart system initialization compare with runit?

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: Vincent Danen takes a look at Ubuntu’s Upstart system, which is an event-based replacement for SysV init that handles the starting of tasks and services during boot.

Designing Firefox 3.2

Filed under
Moz/FF

informationarchitects.jp: In January 2000, T-Online asked us what we’d do if we could design a browser from scratch. Our answer was “Tabs”. Eight years later Aza Raskin, head of user experience at Mozilla, asked me what I think a new tab should look like. The answer after days of mailing back and forth: “Forget tabs!”

Firefox 3.1 Beta 3 - Superb is too modest

Filed under
Moz/FF

dedoimedo.com: Firefox is my favorite browser. It is fast, stable and extensible. It is also quite safe. And it looks good, too. Finally, you may also have heard that Firefox 3.1, the latest version of this phenomenal browser is coming out soon.

Mandriva 2009.1 RC1 Screenshot Tour

Filed under
MDV

news.softpedia.com: On March 10th, Mandriva announced the immediate availability of Mandriva Linux 2009.1 RC1. Though a bit late, we thought it would be nice to please some of our readers and offer them a visual tour of this first release candidate.

Arch Linux - a distro collector’s pick

Filed under
Linux

polishlinux.org: Are you tired of frequent seeking or all these mega-piles of CDs constantly growing on your desktop? Is there any place left out there? Do you really need to wait another six months to update your software or get the feature you expect?

10 Linux and open source developer tools you should not overlook

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: To take advantage of the excellent Linux development environment, you need to have the right tools. Here’s a rundown of some of the best ones out there and the features they have to offer.

Mozilla says next Firefox likely months away

Filed under
Moz/FF

news.cnet.com: Mozilla had planned to release its new "Shiretoko" version of Firefox in early 2009, but with the scale of changes made to the open-source browser, a date halfway through the year now looks more realistic.

Why glxgears is slower with Kernel Modesetting (and why it doesn't matter)

Filed under
Linux

qa-rockstar.livejournal: One interesting fact came out of yesterday's Intel KMS Test Day. Everyone noticed that glxgears is much slower under KMS/DRI2 than it was before (e.g. in Fedora 9 or 10)

Get it done with GNOME Do 0.8.1

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: GNOME Do is an open source launcher utility for the Linux desktop. Its new dock interface combines Mac-like polish and usability with highly efficient keyboard control, and we put it through its paces.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.29 - Part 7:

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: On Thursday night, Linus Torvalds released an eighth pre-release version of Linux 2.6.29 and hinted that this could be the final 2.6.29 release candidate. "What's coming in 2.6.29" series with an overview of driver news from a range of areas.

WattOS Mini-Review

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: My first thought here's yet another Ubuntu dirivitive how many more can there be? Then wait a minute what's this?

the best Linux newsreaders

Filed under
Software

techradar.com: Ah, Usenet newsgroups… Online communication and file sharing for the masses, still equal today to what it was before the advent of blogs, instant messaging and P2P networks.

File-System Benchmarks On The Intel X25-E SSD

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Late last month we looked at the Intel X25-E Extreme SSD on Linux. We ran this high-performance solid-state drive within a System76 Serval Notebook and compared its performance to a Seagate Momentus 7200.2 SATA HDD.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 294

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Tutorial: Installing Linux with Logical Volume Management

  • News: Slackware switches to KDE 4, Ubuntu packages Plymouth, openSUSE resurrects broken download server, Debian overviews 'Squeeze', Tiny Core reveals 10 MB desktop distro, best window managers of 2000
  • Released last week: PCLinuxOS 2009.1, Tiny Core Linux 1.2
  • Upcoming releases: OpenBSD 4.5 pre-orders, Frugalware Linux 1.0
  • New additions: moonOS
  • New distributions: ARAnyM/AFROS Live CD, FuguIta, Jarro Negro Linux, Livre S.O.
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Change is a hard thing to do

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: Changing from closed source programs to open source programs is a hard thing to do. Many people will resist that change fiercely and will pull every trick out of the book to justify their objections to that change.

hands-on with the Kogan Agora Netbook Pro

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

pcworld.idg.com.au: Look out Australia, there's a new netbook about to hit town and it's by Kogan. It's a 10.2in netbook that will cost $539. For the price you'll get 2GB of RAM and a 1.6GHz Intel Atom N270 CPU. Kogan has chosen to release the Agora Netbook Pro with gOS.

Don’t fear the fsync!

Filed under
Software

thunk.org/tytso: After reading the comments on my earlier post, Delayed allocation and the zero-length file problem, it’s become very clear to me that there are a lot of myths and misplaced concerns about fsync() and how best to use it.

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • HOWTO: compile mplayer with VDPAU under Ubuntu (x86 or x86_64)

  • Ubuntu 9.04 ported to Nokia's N8x0 Internet Tablets
  • Indian opposition party backs open source software
  • Fear and loathing in Holland
  • More Unix/Linux Cartoons
  • How Successfully Dual-Boot Hackintosh and Ubuntu Linux
  • Economic plight boosts Linux adoption
  • Final Round Of Linux/Unix Cartoons
  • Dealing with SSH’s key spam problem
  • Install/Set-up Conky on Ubuntu
  • GParted eats my day…
  • Tutorial : Easily save any online video in Linux
  • Linux gains social networking hub
  • Linux Void 23 - No Gregor It’s Not Pi Day Yet
  • Elisa - A Great Open Media Center

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #133

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #133 for the week of March 8th- March 14th, 2009 is now available.

Selling open source to the powers-that-be

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: The idea of thinking up a hypothetical situation and then asking a group of qualified panellists to visualise how each would react to it is nothing new.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?