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Friday, 22 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story PeaZip 5.9.0 Open Source Archiver Adds Support for Extracting RAR5 Files on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 30/11/2015 - 1:27am
Story MakuluLinux Aero Edition Officially Released, Based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 29/11/2015 - 10:54pm
Story Fedora 21 Through Fedora 23 Performance On An Apple MacBook Air Rianne Schestowitz 29/11/2015 - 10:52pm
Story An Everyday Linux User Review Of Chakra Linux 2015.11 "Fermi" Rianne Schestowitz 29/11/2015 - 10:45pm
Story What is hacker culture? Rianne Schestowitz 29/11/2015 - 8:09pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2015 - 8:00pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2015 - 7:59pm
Story Sabayon 15.12 Updates Plasma 5, GNOME 3.18 Goes Into Testing Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2015 - 7:52pm
Story Solus Operating System Gets a Fix for Acer C720 Boot Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2015 - 7:50pm
Story Watch: Unity 8 and Unity 7 Indicators Side-by-Side Comparison Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2015 - 7:49pm

Sydney Linux group may merge with Linux Australia

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: The Sydney Linux User Group may be wound up by the end of the month and function instead as a sub-committee of Linux Australia if a motion drafted by its president, James Polley, is passed at the AGM on March 25.

Firefox 4 RC expected March 9

Filed under
Moz/FF

zdnet.com: Mozilla is planning to spin the first release candidate for Firefox 4 this Friday and the code is aimed to be released to beta testers as early as next Wednesday, March 9, developers said during a call today.

Have some Linux ascii fun with asciiquarium

Filed under
Software
HowTos

ghacks.net: Never let it be said that Linux users and developers do not have a sense of humor. Even the most hardcore of users, developers, designers, and administrators need something to serve as a distraction.

GNOME 3

Can't Wait!
16% (242 votes)
Mildly excited
14% (219 votes)
not excited
7% (105 votes)
indifferent
7% (107 votes)
dreading it
8% (120 votes)
use KDE
39% (598 votes)
use Other
9% (145 votes)
Total votes: 1536

GNOME 3 Beta: Ever So Slightly More Than a Pretty Face

Filed under
Software

linuxinsider.com: I'm not convinced that the new user interface for the shell for GNOME is more efficient than the existing one. But the look and feel is certainly much different. The new interface seems to cut out certain keyboard shortcuts, forcing you to go a little click-crazy.

The challenges of developing long, plot-heavy FOSS games

Filed under
Gaming

freegamer.blogspot: Xenogears is one of my favorite games of all time. For those of you who are unfamiliar with it, it was a Japanese RPG for the Sony PS1 in 1998. Xenogears was never really finished. Painfully, these issues apply in even greater force to non-commercial game projects.

Open Letter to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Open Letter to Ubuntu – fix the patching schedule
  • Ubuntu isn’t a volunteer-driven project
  • Ubuntu, the cloud OS
  • Ubuntu 11.10 Release Schedule
  • Full Circle Podcast 16

Back to Basics with KDE 4

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: After our review of KDE 4.6, we received a great deal of positive comments, but not all of them were sparkling assessments of KDE’s functionality. For that reason, I have decided to get back to the basics this week with a little how-to guide for KDE 3 users who may be reluctant to switch to KDE 4.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.38 (Part 4) - Storage

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Expected in March, the forthcoming kernel will contain the new LIO target framework for implementing Storage Area Networks (SANs). Also new are a kernel-side media presence polling feature for disk drives and various Device Mapper optimisations that are relevant for desktop systems.

12 Things You May not Know About Gimp

Filed under
GIMP

gimpology.com: I realized today that there's a lot of people who use Gimp, but don't really know the history of it, nor even care, but if you're a Gimp freak like me, and absolutely love the software, and wanna know the history about it, or simply just wanna findout some stuff about it. Then here's 12 Things You May not Know About Gimp.

Linux Gazette March 2011 (#184):

Filed under
Linux
Software
HowTos

linuxgazette.net: The March edition of the Linux Gazette monthly is online and ready to read. Highlights include: HAL: Part 2 My Favourite Aliases, Playing around with IPv6 on Linux, and The Foolish Things We Do With Our Computers.

A Introduction to Bordeaux 2011.03 for Linux FreeBSD and PC BSD

Filed under
Software

wine-reviews.net: The upcoming Bordeaux for Linux and BSD 2011.03 release will see a major shift in how the program is written and the new features that will be available to current and future Bordeaux customers.

Controversy surrounds Red Hat's "obfuscated" source code release

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Red Hat has changed the way it ships the source code for the Linux kernel. Previously, it was released as a standard kernel with a collection of patches which could be applied to create the source code of the kernel Red Hat used. Now though, the company ships a tarball of the source code with the patches already applied.

Tom's Definitive Linux Software Roundup: Audio Production

Filed under
Software

tomshardware.com: Welcome to Tom's Definitive Linux Software Roundup: Audio Production. In this article, we're looking at Linux applications for audio content creation. Our previous segment covered general end-user audio consumption apps like media managers, audio players, and CD rippers. This segment is for the audio professional, hobbyist, and musician.

Managing Open Source vs. Proprietary Issues

Filed under
OSS
  • Managing Open Source vs. Proprietary Issues
  • Death, taxes and open source software certainties
  • thebigword Goes Open-Source as Lisa Shuts Down (PR)

Ubuntu fast becoming Linux pariah

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu fast becoming Linux pariah
  • Canonical: Hardened corporate or community leader?

Getting Started With Linux: Pick The Right Linux

Filed under
Linux

lifehacker.com.au: If you’ve decided to give Linux a go, maybe for the second time, it’s time to pick out a system and at least load it onto a “live” USB stick. If you’re new to the Linux world, here are the distributions we recommend trying out.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • A Restart For The Botched RandR 1.4
  • X.Org Server 1.11 Release Planned For Mid-August
  • LibreOffice Conference to be held in Paris this October
  • The Ins and Outs of Open Source Audits: Part One
  • froglogic Confident of the Qt Platform's Future
  • Sabayon “App Store”, abbr: Entropy Store
  • Scale 9x: Day 3
  • SCALE 9X: It’s a wrap
  • Software Freedom Is Elementary, My Dear Watson
  • Open Source Junction: cross-platform mobile apps
  • GNU/Linux in Turkey
  • Exciting developments in GNU Radio
  • True Open Standards; Open Source Next?
  • Is Linus’ Law still valid?
  • Boxee Gets $16 Million in Funding for Media Center
  • Windows shuts door on user, Linux welcomes the guest
  • Volume icons disappear from Ubuntu Places menu & Nautilus sidebar
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Live CD will offer Upgrade
  • Unity 3.6.0 Will Come with Option to Maximize Dash
  • openSUSE Build Service team releases new versions
  • Origins of Programming and Computers
  • Open Source Tool Helps US DoD Eye in the Sky
  • U.S. Government Configuration Baseline for RHEL 5
  • Free as in Freedom: Episode0x0A

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Dropbox for KDE
  • Cannot authenticate privileged applications
  • How To Install Apache 2 with SSL on Linux (with mod_ssl, openssl)
  • Get Your Camcorder Working in Linux with Kino
  • wireless: remember the firmware!
  • Changing the root user name

Updates for GIMP 2.8 and future plans

Filed under
GIMP

gimpusers.com: There are some things going on currently on the development of GIMP. The devs were chatting in a dev meeting last night about some important topics including:

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More in Tux Machines

PulseAudio 12 Open-Source Sound System Released with AirPlay, A2DP Improvements

Highlights of PulseAudio 12.0 include better latency reporting with the A2DP Bluetooth profile, which also improves A/V sync, more accurate latency reporting on AirPlay devices, the ability to prioritize HDMI output over S/PDIF output, HSP support for more Bluetooth headsets, and the ability to disable input and output on macOS. PulseAudio 12.0 also adds support for Steelseries Arctis 7 USB headset stereo output and Dell's Thunderbolt Dock TB16 speaker jack, a new "dereverb" option that can be used for the Speex echo canceller, a new module-always-source module, better detection of Native Instruments Traktor Audio 6, and improved digital input support for various USB sound cards. Read more

Automatically Change Wallpapers in Linux with Little Simple Wallpaper Changer

Here is a tiny script that automatically changes wallpaper at regular intervals in your Linux desktop. Read more

EU Law Threatens Free/Open Source Software

  • EU votes on copyright law that could kill memes and open source software
    The European Union has passed an initial vote in favour of the Copyright Directive, a legislation experts say "threatens the internet". As reported by Wired, the mandate is designed to update internet copyright law but contains two controversial clauses. Ultimately, it could force prominent online platforms to censor their users' content before it's posted—which could impact everyone from meme creators to open source software designers and livestreamers. Despite passing a vote yesterday—held by the EU's Legal Affairs Committee (JURI)—the directive needs parliamentary approval before becoming law.
  • The EU Parliament Legal Affairs Committee Vote on Directive on Copyright, David Clark Cause and IBM's Call for Code, Equus' New WHITEBOX OPEN Server Platform and More
    Yesterday the European Parliament Legal Affairs Committee voted in favor of "the most harmful provisions of the proposed Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market", Creative Commons reports. The provisions include the Article 11 "link tax", which requires "anyone using snippets of journalistic content to first get a license or pay a fee to the publisher for its use online." The committee also voted in favor of Article 13, which "requires online platforms to monitor their users' uploads and try to prevent copyright infringement through automated filtering." There are still several steps to get through before the Directive is completely adopted. See EDRi for more information.
  • GitHub: Changes to EU copyright law could derail open source distribution
  • The E.U. votes to make memes essentially illegal
    On Wednesday, European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs voted to essentially make memes illegal. The decision came as part of the approval process for the innocuously named “Article 13,” which would require larger sites to scan all user uploads using content recognition technology in an attempt to flag any and all remotely copyrighted material in photos, text, music, videos, and more. Meaning memes using stills from copyrighted films could be auto-blocked, along with remixes of viral videos, and basically anything that’s popular on live-streaming sites like Twitch.
  • Europe takes step towards 'censorship machines' for internet uploads
    A key committee at the European Parliament has voted for a new provision in a legislative act that forces tech giants and other online platforms to share revenues with publishers. It is known as Article 13, and is part of an updating of the Copyright Directive. Article 13 proposes that large websites use “content recognition technologies” to scan for copyrighted materials, though it doesn’t explain how this works in practice. This means texts, sounds and even code which get uploaded have to go through an automated filtering system, potentially threatening the creation of memes and open-source software developers.

The EC’s Expected Decision Against Android Is an Unfortunate Attack on Open Source Software

The European Commission (“EC”) is preparing to release its decision against Android, and its framing of the issues makes clear that successful open source software will have a hard time in Europe. In its Statement of Objections, the Commission signaled that Apple’s iOS, Android’s fiercest rival, would be excluded from the market definition because it is closed source and not available to other hardware makers. The decision is expected to declare unlawful strategies to monetize a free product, provide a consistent user experience to customers expecting the Google brand, and to maintain code consistency to minimize problems for developers using the platform. The decision is not expected to contain any indication on how open source platform developers can solve these problems that are fundamental to their success. Read more