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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 17 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Bodhi Linux 3.1.0 Release Rianne Schestowitz 11/08/2015 - 9:47pm
Story Fedora 23 Alpha Arrives with Devel Version of GNOME 3.18 Rianne Schestowitz 11/08/2015 - 9:44pm
Story DNF 1.1.0 and DNF-PLUGINS-CORE 0.1.10 Released Rianne Schestowitz 11/08/2015 - 9:40pm
Story More Ubuntu One and Ubuntu Phones Roy Schestowitz 11/08/2015 - 9:25pm
Story Leftovers: KDE/Qt Roy Schestowitz 11/08/2015 - 9:02pm
Story Dronecode Foundation keeps drone tech open Roy Schestowitz 11/08/2015 - 8:45pm
Story More Windows 10 Experiences from Linuxland Roy Schestowitz 11/08/2015 - 8:28pm
Story NVIDIA Releases Linux Graphics Debugger For OpenGL 4.2~4.5 Rianne Schestowitz 11/08/2015 - 5:52pm
Story 'CVE-2015-4495 and SELinux', Or why doesn't SELinux confine Firefox? Rianne Schestowitz 11/08/2015 - 4:23pm
Story Alcatel OneTouch Idol 3 an unlocked Android bargain (Review) Rianne Schestowitz 11/08/2015 - 3:50pm

Bossie Awards 2010: The best open source software of the year

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: InfoWorld's Test Center picks the top open source platforms, middleware, applications, and application development tools

10 Compelling Reasons to Switch to Opera from Firefox

Filed under
Software

walyou.com/blog: When it comes to innovation, Opera leads on many fronts (which we will be discussing today) but it hasn’t seen the success it deserves. It is a remarkable browser, which is still not too familiar to regular Internet users, but it should be praised.

Three things Microsoft need to do NOW to prove it loves open souce

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

zdnet.com/blog: Back in 2001 Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer called Linux a “cancer” that threatened the company, but now the Redmond giant claims to “love open source.” Well, actions speak louder than words.

Acer ZGA Chrome OS Netbook Mentioned In Linux Kernel Changelog

Filed under
Linux

electronista.com: A discovery late Monday has revealed that Google may already be testing Acer-made netbooks running Chrome OS. An "Acer ZGA" system has surfaced in a Linux kernel changelog that would be consistent with Aspire One netbooks.

Marten Mickos defends honor of Ubuntu's Koala food

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: Marten Mickos – the former MySQL chief executive who now heads build-you-own-cloud outfit Eucalyptus Systems – has defended the Eucalyptus platform against recent criticism of both its "open core" model and its ability to scale beyond a relatively small number of servers.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Free PhotoShop
  • OpenSUSE 11.3 and Multimedia
  • Gentoo needs you!
  • ColorCube – Puzzle Game Released!
  • Meerkat software center gets background
  • Municipality of Modena removing vendor dependency office tools
  • Rethinking Canonical’s Ubuntu Business Strategy
  • Who Tops the Evil Tech List?
  • Illuminating the Illumos Project
  • The Five Winners of Oracle suing Google
  • Oracle and open source
  • Oracle forms new 'axis of evil' against open source, claims Adobe
  • Oracle takes over JavaOne conference
  • GNOME Shell Themes Now Have an Equinox Variant
  • Lightweight Distro Roundup: Day 7 – Impressions So Far

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Create a repository with subversion
  • Get website metrics with AWStats
  • Remove All Files Except Some
  • get Ralink 2870 wireless usb adapter working in
  • SalixOS/Slackware-13.1
  • Make Your Firefox Browser Start Up Faster
  • Introduction to Das U-Boot

Why I’ll Never Offer Ubuntu Desktop To Clients

Filed under
Ubuntu

prosulum.com: Imagine a place where all businesses had $0 recurring expense for business related software. A wonderful land where all you had to worry about was convincing clients to pay you for maintenance, and not license fees.

Introducing Windows users to Linux

Filed under
Linux

cristalinux.blogspot: Like many current Linux users, I once used Windows exclusively. Luckily, I learnt that there are alternatives that are just as good, if not better.

Pigs Can Fly

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft 'Loves' Open Source, and Pigs Can Fly
  • A couple comments on "Microsoft: ‘We love open source’"

Linux Market Share

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: I came across this well-written piece from the Royal Pingdom Blog referenced on Linux Today. It’s about the failure of desktop Linux to break the 1% market share barrier, and I confess that it left me a little depressed. But I decided to add my two cents on the subject anyhow.

Firefox 4 Beta Updated with Sync and Panorama

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.mozilla.com: The latest update to Firefox 4 Beta is now available with new features that offer more control over your Web experience. This release lets you own and control your personal Web experience by syncing your data across devices, and by helping you organize your tabs in order to juggle and prioritize your busy online life.

Top 20 Apps for GNOME Fans

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: With so much focus on how one desktop environment compares with another, it's easy to lose focus on what really matters here – the applications we use each and every day.

First pre-release version of Fedora 14

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The Fedora Project has released the first and only alpha version of its Fedora 14 Linux distribution, code named "Laughlin".

Cheating on Ubuntu with a Mac

zdnet.com/blog: It started with harmless flirtations with Windows 7. I mean, come on, it was pretty, fast, stable, and popular. I love Ubuntu, but I’m only human, right? No harm in looking.

The ZenMini of netbook Linuxes

Filed under
Linux

openattitude.com: PCLinuxOS Gnome ZenMini DesktopOpenSUSE isn’t the only new distro at the Oa compound; I’ve also replaced Easy Peasy on my netbook with PCLinuxOS, running the GNOME ZenMini Desktop.

Keep the "Linux" out of it Please

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Android and Ubuntu are arguably the two largest Linux success stories to date. Ubuntu with its soaring success over other Linux-based desktop solutions and Android with its seemingly single handed domination of the mobile market. What makes these two distributions so successful?

Red Hat takeover talk heats up ahead of press conference

Filed under
Linux

localtechwire.com: Someday, rumors that Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) will be bought out by a larger rival, will come true. Is that day at hand?

Also: Red Hat: Will SAP Acquire Linux Leader?

Alpine Linux 2 review

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Alpine Linux is a distribution designed primarily for use as a router, firewall and application gateway. The latest stable version, Alpine Linux 2.0, was released last week (August 17, 2010).

Inkscape 0.48 lined up and released

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: The open source scalable vector editor Inkscape has been updated to version 0.48 in a release designed to incorporate Google Summer of Code (GSoC) improvements and other developments over the last nine months.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • MX Linux Review of MX-17 – For The Record
    MX Linux Review of MX-17. MX-17 is a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS Linux communities. It’s XFCE based, lightning fast, comes with both 32 and 64-bit CPU support…and the tools. Oh man, the tools available in this distro are both reminders of Mepis past and current tech found in modern distros.
  • Samsung Halts Android 8.0 Oreo Rollouts for Galaxy S8 Due to Unexpected Reboots
    Samsung stopped the distribution of the Android 8.0 Oreo operating system update for its Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones due to unexpected reboots reported by several users. SamMobile reported the other day that Samsung halted all Android 8.0 Oreo rollouts for its Galaxy S8/S8+ series of Android smartphones after approximately a week since the initial release. But only today Samsung published a statement to inform user why it stopped the rollouts, and the cause appears to be related to a limited number of cases of unexpected reboots after installing the update.
  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Kevin Tian
    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.
  • Initial Intel Icelake Support Lands In Mesa OpenGL Driver, Vulkan Support Started
    A few days back I reported on Intel Icelake patches for the i965 Mesa driver in bringing up the OpenGL support now that several kernel patch series have been published for enabling these "Gen 11" graphics within the Direct Rendering Manager driver. This Icelake support has been quick to materialize even with Cannonlake hardware not yet being available.
  • LunarG's Vulkan Layer Factory Aims To Make Writing Vulkan Layers Easier
    Introduced as part of LunarG's recent Vulkan SDK update is the VLF, the Vulkan Layer Factory. The Vulkan Layer Factory aims to creating Vulkan layers easier by taking care of a lot of the boilerplate code for dealing with the initialization, etc. This framework also provides for "interceptor objects" for overriding functions pre/post API calls for Vulkan entry points of interest.

Logstash 6.2.0 Released, Alfresco Grabbed by Private Equity Firm

  • Logstash 6.2.0 Release Improves Open Source Data Processing Pipeline
    The "L" in the ELK stack gets updated with new features including advanced security capabilities. Many modern enterprises have adopted the ELK (Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana) stack to collect, process, search and visualize data. At the core of the ELK stack is the open-source Logstash project which defines itself as a server-side data processing pipeline - basically it helps to collect logs and then send them to a users' "stash" for searching, which in many cases is Elasticsearch.
  • Alfresco Software acquired by Private Equity Firm
    Enterprise apps company taken private in a deal that won't see a change in corporate direction. Alfresco has been developing its suite of Enterprise Content Management (ECM) and Business Process Management (BPM) technology since the company was founded back in June of 2005. On Feb. 8, Alfresco announced that it was being acquired by private equity firm Thomas H. Lee Partners (THL). Financial terms of the deal are not being publicly disclosed.

Servers and GPUs: Theano, DevOps, Kubernetes, AWS

  • Open Source Blockchain Computer Theano
    TigoCTM CEO Cindy Zimmerman says “we are excited to begin manufacturing our secure, private and open source desktops at our factory in the Panama Pacifico special economic zone. This is the first step towards a full line of secure, blockchain-powered hardware including desktops, servers, laptops, tablets, teller machines, and smartphones.” [...] Every component of each TigoCTM device is exhaustively researched and selected for its security profile based especially on open source hardware, firmware, and software. In addition, devices will run the GuldOS operating system, and open source applications like the Bitcoin, Ethereum and Dash blockchains. This fully auditable stack is ideal for use in enterprise signing environments such as banks and investment funds.
  • Enterprises identify 10 essential tools for DevOps [Ed: "Source code repository" and other old things co-opted to promote the stupid buzzword "devops"]
    Products branded with DevOps are everywhere, and the list of options grows every day, but the best DevOps tools are already well-known among enterprise IT pros.
  • The 4 Major Tenets of Kubernetes Security
    We look at security from the perspective of containers, Kubernetes deployment itself and network security. Such a holistic approach is needed to ensure that containers are deployed securely and that the attack surface is minimized. The best practices that arise from each of the above tenets apply to any Kubernetes deployment, whether you’re self-hosting a cluster or employing a managed service. We should note that there are related security controls outside of Kubernetes, such as the Secure Software Development Life Cycle (S-SDLC) or security monitoring, that can help reduce the likelihood of attacks and increase the defense posture. We strongly urge you to consider security across the entire application lifecycle rather than take a narrow focus on the deployment of containers with Kubernetes. However, for the sake of brevity, in this series, we will only cover security controls within the immediate Kubernetes environment.
  • GPUs on Google’s Kubernetes Engine are now available in open beta
    The Google Kubernetes Engine (previously known as the Google Container Engine and GKE) now allows all developers to attach Nvidia GPUs to their containers. GPUs on GKE (an acronym Google used to be quite fond of, but seems to be deemphasizing now) have been available in closed alpha for more than half a year. Now, however, this service is in beta and open to all developers who want to run machine learning applications or other workloads that could benefit from a GPU. As Google notes, the service offers access to both the Tesla P100 and K80 GPUs that are currently available on the Google Cloud Platform.
  • AWS lets users run SAP apps directly on SUSE Linux
  • SUSE collaborates with Amazon Web Services toaccelerate SAP migrations

Chrome and Firefox

  • The False Teeth of Chrome's Ad Filter.
    Today Google launched a new version of its Chrome browser with what they call an "ad filter"—which means that it sometimes blocks ads but is not an "ad blocker." EFF welcomes the elimination of the worst ad formats. But Google's approach here is a band-aid response to the crisis of trust in advertising that leaves massive user privacy issues unaddressed. Last year, a new industry organization, the Coalition for Better Ads, published user research investigating ad formats responsible for "bad ad experiences." The Coalition examined 55 ad formats, of which 12 were deemed unacceptable. These included various full page takeovers (prestitial, postitial, rollover), autoplay videos with sound, pop-ups of all types, and ad density of more than 35% on mobile. Google is supposed to check sites for the forbidden formats and give offenders 30 days to reform or have all their ads blocked in Chrome. Censured sites can purge the offending ads and request reexamination. [...] Some commentators have interpreted ad blocking as the "biggest boycott in history" against the abusive and intrusive nature of online advertising. Now the Coalition aims to slow the adoption of blockers by enacting minimal reforms. Pagefair, an adtech company that monitors adblocker use, estimates 600 million active users of blockers. Some see no ads at all, but most users of the two largest blockers, AdBlock and Adblock Plus, see ads "whitelisted" under the Acceptable Ads program. These companies leverage their position as gatekeepers to the user's eyeballs, obliging Google to buy back access to the "blocked" part of their user base through payments under Acceptable Ads. This is expensive (a German newspaper claims a figure as high as 25 million euros) and is viewed with disapproval by many advertisers and publishers.
  • Going Home
  • David Humphrey: Edge Cases
  • Experiments in productivity: the shared bug queue
    Over the next six months, Mozilla is planning to switch code review tools from mozreview/splinter to phabricator. Phabricator has more modern built-in tools like Herald that would have made setting up this shared queue a little easier, and that’s why I paused…briefly
  • Improving the web with small, composable tools
    Firefox Screenshots is the first Test Pilot experiment to graduate into Firefox, and it’s been surprisingly successful. You won’t see many people talking about it: it does what you expect, and it doesn’t cover new ground. Mozilla should do more of this.