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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 26 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ATM operators eye Linux as alternative to Windows XP Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 8:45pm
Story Linux Mint 17 to Be Called “Qiana,” Release Date Announced Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 8:30pm
Story Today in Techrights Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 5:44pm
Story Open Source Apache and Nginx Web Servers Get More Secure Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 11:42am
Story Trying Out The Debian 8.0 Jessie Installer Alpha 1 Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 11:36am
Story Android-x86 Just Might Make a Good Linux Desktop Alternative Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 11:22am
Story Trojita 0.4.1, a security update for CVE-2014-2567 / Announcing Geary 0.6.0 Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 11:17am
Story KDE 4.13 Makes It Into Kubuntu 14.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 10:53pm
Story Blender 2.70 Release Notes Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 8:49pm
Story Huawei kills plans to launch a dual-OS Windows Phone-Android smartphone Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 8:33pm

Announcing The Ubuntu OF Fame

Filed under
Ubuntu After a number of follow-up calls, a functional specification and some testing we are now proud to announce the Ubuntu Hall Of Fame:

Sustainability in Uncertain Times

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blog.lizardwrangler: Today we are posting our audited financial statements and tax form for 2007. As in past years, I’ll use this event as an opportunity to review both our financial status and our overall effectiveness in moving the mission forward.

Also: Mozilla chairman unfazed by Google Chrome

Exciting Features For Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu If all goes according to plan, the first alpha release for Ubuntu 9.04 (the Jaunty Jackalope) will be released tomorrow. It's not even been one month since the release of Ubuntu 8.10, but this first alpha release will show early signs of what we can expect.

Sun wrestles itself with StarOffice 9

Filed under
Software StarOffice 9 reminds me of the classic Monty Python skit in which Graham Chapman wrestles himself. Although StarOffice is being aggressively presented as an alternative to Microsoft Office, it seems to be equally marketed and bundled to compete against

Linux distros and Apple beat Microsoft’s homepage uptime

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royal.pingdom: All Linux distributions have their own home base: their homepage. How well is this homepage taken care of and how well does it perform? To answer these questions we have monitored the uptime and load time of the homepages for 16 Linux distributions for a month.

Ulteo unveils the first Open Source virtual desktop Following its commitment to desktop virtualization solutions, Ulteo announced today that they were releasing the first installable version of their Open Virtual Desktop solution for enterprises.

Did Microsoft really kill OLPC?

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education.zdnet: I posted a number of pieces Monday about OLPC and its XO laptop (now for sale on Amazon in a reboot of the Give One Get One program), one of which declared that OLPC was dead. A year ago, that would have been worthy of a pretty serious flame war.

Software as a subversive activity: The making of a Linux geek

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jdeeth.blogspot: I last booted Windows on my year-old laptop on October 8, according to my SETI@Home stats. I hadn't realized my conversion had been so complete, but over the course of the last few months, I found myself in Gates World less and less for fewer and fewer things. So it seems I'm now officially a Linux Geek.

Ubuntu Tweak: Useful and Easy

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Software A new version of Ubuntu Tweak has just been released and continues to make tweaking easier and fun for Ubuntu. Thanks to Ubuntu Tweak you don’t have to hack deep into the terminal for making many useful changes to your Ubuntu setup.

LoseThos: The Linux Killer?

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OS If every new iteration of Ubuntu can be a Windows killer and every new touch screen phone is an iphone killer; why can’t an open source, 64-bit, kernel mode, 100k line of original code, and with a funky name like LoseThos, be a Linux killer?

Good (Linux) Things on the Horizon

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community.zdnet: We seem to be in a particularly good period for Linux at the moment. We've recently gotten the Mandriva 2009.0 and Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex releases, and both of them seem to be very good. There will be a number of new releases coming in the next few weeks, as well:

Why Free Software is a Con-Trick

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opendotdotdot.blogspot: How does free software generally operate? It begins with a call for *help* - which means that it elicits the same deep human response as the con-trick described in the original post.

The Web's 11 worst blogs

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Web Love 'em or hate 'em, blogs are everywhere you look these days. From Britney to your boss's bratty nephew, it seems everyone has something to say--and no one's shy about sharing. We decided to seek out the lamest blogs lurking around the Internet.

AbiWord: How To Start Word Processing in Two Seconds Flat

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AbiWord is a light-weight, open-source word processor that works under Linux, Mac OSX and Windows. Its layout will feel familiar to anyone who has used a word processor before, and you will find most things where you first look for them.

You know you are a Linux geek when...

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Linux Not everybody is a Linux geek, or a geek at all for that matter. However some of us assimilated ones are so I decided to make a list to show what separates a Linux geek from the rest. This list is from my personal experience and is in no particular order.

First Ubuntu Jaunty Alpha imminent

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Ubuntu Most of us have only just got our systems updated to Intrepid Ibex, but the Ubuntu development team is steaming ahead with plans for an Alpha 1 release of Jaunty Jackalope tomorrow.

Why I Choose CentOS for a Server

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Linux There are many options available for Linux distros, over 500. Most of them you can make into a server. However, if you are looking for the professional level server that, in my opinion, leads all other distros in functioning as a server then you need to investigate CentOS.

Mandriva, gimme a break, will ya?

Filed under
MDV So I installed for a second time Mandriva 2009 XFCE. OK, it's not an official Mandriva product, but it's using its packages. And it's annoying.

Ubuntu at the Crossroads of System Logs and Community Feedback

Filed under
Ubuntu Jono Bacon, Ubuntu's community manager, has been hard at work nailing gelatin to the wall. He's putting a lot of thought into how he can best determine the vitality, growth, needs and wants of the Ubuntu community and how they best mesh with, and give back to, the wider Linux and open source communities.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Desktop Gmail App WMail Scores a Sizeable Update
    There's a new stable release of WMail, the app that describes itself as "the missing desktop client for Gmail".
  • 2 free desktop recording tools to try: SimpleScreenRecorder and Kazam
    A picture might be worth a thousand words, but a video demonstration can save a lot of talking. I'm a visual learner, so seeing how to do something has been very helpful in my education. I've found that students benefit from seeing exactly how an application is configured or how a code snippet is written. Desktop screen recorders are great tools for creating instructional videos. In this article, I'll look at two free, open source desktop screen recorders: SimpleScreenRecorder and Kazam.
  • Nightfall on Linux
    I've looked at general astronomy programs in the past that are helpful for many tasks you might need to do in your stargazing career. But, several specific jobs are more complicated and require specialized software to make relevant calculations, so here, let's take a look at Nightfall. Nightfall is a program that can handle calculations involving binary star systems. It can animate binary star systems, taking into account not only orbital speeds but also rotational motion and the changing shape of stars due to their close positions. You can model what it would look like and what kind of light curves you would register when observing a binary system. You even can take a set of actual observational data and find a best-fit model for the system you are studying.
  • Nmap 7.31 Security Scanner Updates Npcap with Raw 802.11 Wi-Fi Capture Support
    The first point release of the popular, open-source, and cross-platform Nmap 7.30 free security scanner and network mapper arrived, versioned 7.31, adding several important stability improvements, and bug fixes. New features in Nmap 7.31 include Npcap 0.10r9, which has been upgraded from version 0.10r2 bundled in Nmap 7.30 to add raw 802.11 Wi-Fi capture support, updated Zenmap graphical interface to indicate that better display of hostname is attached to Topology page's address, and IPv6 fingerprint submission improvements. "To increase the number of IPv6 fingerprint submissions, a prompt for submission will be shown with some random chance for successful matches of OS classes that are based on only a few submissions. Previously, only unsuccessful matches produced such a prompt," read the release notes for Nmap 7.31.
  • Shotwell 0.25.0 Image Viewer Supports ACDSee Tags, Improves Piwigo Support
    A new stable release of the popular Shotwell open-source image viewer and organizer arrived for users of Linux-based operating systems, version 0.25.0, bringing lots of important changes. As usual, we've managed to get our hands on the internal changelog, which we've also attached at the end of the story for your reading pleasure, and we'd like to tell you that Shotwell 0.25.0 now supports the tags written by the commercial ACDSee photo manipulation software. The application now makes use of Unicode characters, supports recent Vala compiler releases, improves the Piwigo upload support by implementing an option to override the SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate handling, and another one to display the SSL certificate, along with better creation of new albums.
  • xfce4-panel 4.12.1 Released, Xfce 4.14 Still A Long Ways Out
    Xfce4-panel 4.12.1 has been released as a "long overdue maintenance release" while Xfce 4.14 is still in its infancy. Xfce4-panel 4.12.1 has translation updates, support for xfpanel-switch in the preferences, and just some basic fixes. This comes a few weeks after the quiet bug-fix releases of xfce4-settings 4.12.1 and also joined by the xfconf 4.12.1 release this week.
  • Video Call Improvements Land in Skype for Linux Alpha 1.11
  • Dual-GPU integration in GNOME
    Thanks to the work of Hans de Goede and many others, dual-GPU (aka NVidia Optimus or AMD Hybrid Graphics) support works better than ever in Fedora 25. On my side, I picked up some work I originally did for Fedora 24, but ended up being blocked by hardware support. This brings better integration into GNOME.
  • ‘GNOME To Do’ App Picks Up New Features
    GNOME To Do is one of those apps you’ve probably heard of, but do not use. And with a bunch of rivals task managers and to-do list apps available on Linux — from Simplenote to Remember the Milk — and online, the little app that might has its work cutout.

today's howtos

More Games for GNU/Linux

  • Humble Gems Bundle Goes Live, Offers Chroma Squad For Peanuts
    Wallets at the ready as Humble Gems Bundle is now live, a pay-what-you-can-be-bothered-to-palooza offering a selection of hitherto undiscovered indie gaming marvels. Alright, they’re all games that you’ve probably heard of before, certainly if you’re an active fan of the indie gaming scene.
  • Civilization 6 Linux Release Teased By Aspyr?
    Recently, Aspyr Media confirmed that they’ll be doing a Civilization 6 Linux release soon. Currently, Civilization 6 is live on both PC and Mac. Will Aspyr Media release concrete details about the Civilization 6 Linux release in the next few days?
  • Playstation 4 Linux Hack May Show 4.01 Vulnerability
    A new video about a Playstation 4 Linux hack may have shown a vulnerability in the 4.01 firmware update that came out for the Playstation 4 a few weeks ago. The hacking news came from a video at the GeekPwn 2016 convention in Shanghai, China, where the hacking was shown via a live demo. In this demo, a pair of Chinese computer users use a Linux computer and the Webkit browser, which is used to inject a certain exploit into the Playstation 4. One cut later, and a command line prompt appears that is then used to play Super Mario Bros. While the first use for it in the live demo is innocuous, the fact that this is even possible points once again to possible holes in the Playstation’s security.
  • PlayStation 4 hack enables Linux on recent Sony firmware
    A showcase event at this week’s GeekPwn conference in Shanghai suggests that Sony’s PlayStation 4 has been hacked, as a recently released video shows the console running an unsanctioned Linux build courtesy of a web browser exploit. While details regarding the hack are not yet known, a browser-based security issue in PS4 firmware version 4.01 could potentially allow users to root the upcoming PlayStation 4 Pro console in order to run unlicensed applications and games.

Red Hat News