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Saturday, 17 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Two Distributions I have tested

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Linux Some days ago I have started testing Linux Mint Debian Edition and Archbang. They have some things in common but a lot more different, why did I pick those to test?, because Arch and Debian are my favorites Linux flavors.

Quick Look: Peppermint Ice 10012010

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Linux Peppermint Ice has a new release out today, so I decided to make it the inaugural Quick Look for Eye On Linux. Peppermint Ice, if you aren’t familiar with it, is a cloud-oriented distro based on Ubuntu.

New Fedora Linux Project Leader Building More Than a Distro

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Linux The Red Hat sponsored Fedora Linux community is an open source development effort that includes a diverse set of participants. At the top of the organizational chart for Fedora is the position of Fedora Project Leader, the person tasked with overseeing the general direction and operations of the Fedora project.

(Finally) Meeting Mr. Open Source Business

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OSS The careers of few people have been so intertwined with the history of open source as that of Larry Augustin. He was even present when the term “open source” was coined, at a meeting at the offices of his GNU/Linux hardware company VA Linux, on 3 February 1998.

Free desktop tools that aren't OpenOffice

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Software Most everyone who's had some experience with free open source software has learned about the suite of productivity programs. But apart from, what else is there?

Marvell Gives OLPC $5.6 Million Dollars For XO-3 Tablet Development

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OLPC What to make to this? Marvell, has stepped up their commitment to an XO-3 with $5.6 million dollar grant to One Laptop per Child for XO-3 laptop development through 2011.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 374

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This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: Trisquel GNU/Linux 4.0
  • News: Document Foundation forks into LibreOffice, new features in Edubuntu 10.10, upgrading to Fedora 14 with "preupgrade", Mageia infrastructure updates
  • Questions and answers: Advocating Linux and free software
  • Released last week: Sabayon Linux 5.4, CRUX 2.7
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 10.10
  • Donations: Debian Multimedia repository receives €200
  • New additions: GALPon MiniNo
  • New distributions: Quelitu
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

October 2010 Issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine Ready

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The NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the October 2010 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine. In the October 2010 issue: * LXDE: Configure LXPanel, * OpenOffice 3.2, Part 5: Draw, and * PCLinuxOS Takes Center Stage.

20 Reasons Linux Will Boom in a Post-Recession World

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Linux In this article, I’ll sharing twenty reasons why I believe we will see Linux "booming" in a post-recession world. Even though it's unlikely that the economic turmoil will prompt everyone to stop using proprietary operating systems completely, I am confident that a significant reduction in proprietary operating system usage is on the horizon.

ATI Radeon HD 5450 On Linux

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Hardware In this article we are reviewing the ATI Radeon HD 5450 "Cedar" graphics card, which is AMD's lowest-end Evergreen GPU but will set you back less than $50 USD.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.36 (Part 3) - Architecture & Infrastructure

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Linux In the early hours of Wednesday, Linus Torvalds issued the sixth pre-release version of Linux 2.6.36. Torvalds indicated that he plans to release the final new version 2.6.36 soon, but that there may still be another release candidate before that.

7 months with Windows 7 (a response)

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Microsoft Today I cam across a post titled seven months with windows 7. I do not agree 100% with it. Let me tell you why.

GIMP 2.6.11 Released

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GIMP 2.6.11 is a bug-fix release in the stable GIMP 2.6 series. Among other bug-fixes, it makes printing work with the recently released version 1.10 of the cairo library.

some odds & ends:

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  • Some Statistics about My Linux Box
  • Announcing qxv
  • Collectd - The system statistics collection daemon
  • Ubuntu Fonts – Why Are They So Big?
  • Ubuntu 10.10: GPU hardware acceleration (OpenCL) available
  • Counting Down the Days to Ubuntu 10.10
  • GIMP 2.6.11 is available for download
  • An open source of inspiration
  • MS ‘open' to change
  • Linux: An Interesting VPN/Remote Project
  • MS Dominance - From an IT Professional Perspective

today's howtos:

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  • Making Environment Variables Stick
  • [SOLVED] Disable Note of the Day Add-in Permanently in Gnote
  • Install the latest proprietary graphics driver in Ubuntu
  • Things I didn't want to have to know about git:
  • Support for 7-zip (.7z) Archive in Ubuntu
  • OpenRC, Baselayout2 meet "SIOCADDRT: Network is unreachable"
  • ACPI and APIC Issues – Part 2: Detecting faulty/buggy ACPI BIOS (firmware) code
  • Ubuntu-style Emoticons for Pidgin
  • Update Ubuntu off-line via another Windows/Linux PC using Keryx
  • Gentoo: What did I Install?

Frictional Games - Amnesia: The Dark Descent review

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Gaming Frictional Games may be a small Swedish indie studio, but the outfit has a flair for atmosphere and production values which make its horror titles stand out as much as any heavyweight developer.

Adoption of GNU/Linux on the Desktop

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Linux GNU/Linux was doing well until about 2003 according to W3Schools when SCOG threatened the world with law suits if they did not pay them for use of GNU/Linux.

New Banshee features: Improved transcoding and shuffle by similar artists

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Software One of the things I love about Banshee is how easy it is for people to fix their own issues without requiring extensive knowledge.

A challenge for a Mandriva user: SimplyMepis!

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mandrivachronicles.blogspot: After I read Megatotoro's stats on his Mepis experience here, and the honest review of SimplyMepis 8.5 by Rudresh Jariwala, I decided that it was about time for me to try this admirable Debian-based Linux distribution on a consistent day-to-day basis.

Review: Sabayon 5.4 KDE

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dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: According to the Sabayon developers, Sabayon 5.4 brings to the table a new theme, many bugs fixed, and a couple changes in the included applications.

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More in Tux Machines

NATS Messaging Project Joins Cloud Native Computing Foundation

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) voted on March 14 to accept the NATS messaging project as its newest hosted effort. The NATS project is an open-source distributed messaging technology that got its start seven years ago and has already been deployed by multiple organizations including Ericsson, Comcast, Samsung and General Electric (GE). "NATS has room to grow as cloud native adds more use cases and grows adoption, driven by Kubernetes and containers," Alexis Richardson, Chair of the Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) at the CNCF told eWEEK. "CNCF provides a way to scale community and education so that adopters can engage faster and at all levels." Read more

The 'New' (and 'Improved') Microsoft

lkml: remove eight obsolete architectures

In the end, it seems that while the eight architectures are extremely different, they all suffered the same fate: There was one company in charge of an SoC line, a CPU microarchitecture and a software ecosystem, which was more costly than licensing newer off-the-shelf CPU cores from a third party (typically ARM, MIPS, or RISC-V). It seems that all the SoC product lines are still around, but have not used the custom CPU architectures for several years at this point. Read more

If you hitch a ride with a scorpion… (Coverity)

I haven’t seen a blog post or notice about this, but according to the Twitters, Coverity has stopped supporting online scanning for open source projects. Is anybody shocked by this? Anybody? [...] Not sure what the story is with Coverity, but it probably has something to do with 1) they haven’t been able to monetize the service the way they hoped, or 2) they’ve been able to monetize the service and don’t fancy spending the money anymore or 3) they’ve pivoted entirely and just aren’t doing the scanning thing. Not sure which, don’t really care — the end result is the same. Open source projects that have come to depend on this now have to scramble to replace the service. [...] I’m not going to go all RMS, but the only way to prevent this is to have open tools and services. And pay for them. Read more