Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 20 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why I switched from Fedora to openSUSE srlinuxx 10/07/2009 - 9:56am
Story London Paper cuts costs by 66% with open source website srlinuxx 10/07/2009 - 9:54am
Story PC makers less upbeat about Chrome OS srlinuxx 10/07/2009 - 9:51am
Story Android vs. webOS srlinuxx 1 10/07/2009 - 9:24am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 10/07/2009 - 4:16am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 10/07/2009 - 4:08am
Story Dude I Got a Dell srlinuxx 10/07/2009 - 1:59am
Story Dell is sticking with Ubuntu srlinuxx 10/07/2009 - 1:57am
Story Hands on with Mint 7 srlinuxx 10/07/2009 - 1:56am
Story Mythbuntu and Mint Developers Pans Ubuntu for Strict Time-Release Policy srlinuxx 10/07/2009 - 1:54am

Using PHP on the command line

Filed under
HowTos

PHP is generally regarded as one of the most powerful and easy-to-learn Web scripting technologies, and emphasis has largely been devoted to using PHP on Web sites. However, the same power that can be harnessed to handle complex Web sites can also be used on the command line.

Book Reviews: Ajax Foundations, Ajax at Work

Filed under
Reviews

Ajax has been making the rounds lately, and I needed to learn a bit more about it. So, I grabbed copies of Foundations of Ajax, from Apress, and Ajax in Action, from Manning. One book for new Ajax users and one for those wanting more code than theory.

n/a
n/a

Distributed computing cracks Enigma code

Filed under
OSS

According to the organizers of M4, their open-source message-breaking application managed to crack one of the three original Enigma messages that were intercepted in 1942 early last week.

Fedora Software Fedora Software: Yum, Extras, and the Unfree

Filed under
Linux

In its Fedora Core Linux system, the Red Hat-sponsored Fedora Project aims to only include software that is Open Source and free of reasonable patent claims. As a result, at random intervals, an article or mailing list post will exclaim how Fedora sucks because it doesn't have xyz media player, certain file system support, or other favorite that's in some other Linux.

Fud Alert? Linux (and the Mac) Aren't Even Trying

Filed under
Linux

Today's XP rivals consist of a dozen or more flavors of Linux clients, and the Mac. The programmers building Linux take it seriously -- but none of the companies selling (or giving away) this stuff really seem to care about desktops and laptops. Right now the Linux PC market is fragmented worse than a champagne glass at a Jewish wedding.

NVIDIA 7900 GTX is 8 to 10% faster

Filed under
Hardware

Most of the companies already have the samples of the upcoming Geforce 7900 GTX cards and tested them but they are not happy with the performance.

Also: Phoenix makes a compelling case for the Open Source BIOS

Who uses open source?

Filed under
OSS

Where do we begin when it comes to separating the open source words from the business reality? Where is open source in business and, in particular, in New Zealand business?

Open Source Java: Interview with an Apache Harmony Project Founder

Filed under
Software

There is a lot of open source activity currently surrounding Java, from JBoss and Geronimo (open source application servers) to MyFaces and Spring (open source web application frameworks), but Java itself is the last proprietary piece of the puzzle. If Harmony is successful, will Sun still matter? I asked Dalibor Topic, one of the project founders, to tell us more about the history of the project, its importance to the Java community, and plans for the future.

Book Review: Head First Java, 2nd Edition

Filed under
Reviews

Head First Java takes a drastically different tack toward learning the Java programming language than O'Reilly's other book on the subject, Learning Java. Where the latter takes a fast-paced, highly intellectual approach to the subject, Head First Java is more creative and playful. It's great for learning the Java language, even if it isn't very good at teaching people how to program with it.

Why industry needs open source education

Filed under
OSS

Despite the explosive growth in the use of free and open source software over the last few years there are still many businesses, organisations and individuals that just don't "get it".

FOSDEM 2006 - KOffice and a lost Kubuntu CD

Filed under
KDE

I just came back from FOSDEM. Of course we had a KDE DevRoom which was - IMO - well situated, in the main building and big enough, just opposite of the (from left to right) OpenBSD, FreeBSD, NetBSD and... MirBSD (wth is that last one?). Sunday was (at least our) big day. It was KOffice day. I started off with giving a rundown on our hell of a lot of interesting stuff in KOffice and what makes it so precious, oh yes, really precious. KOffice is THE future, and that's getting more and more obvious.

n/a
n/a

Desktop publishing with Writer and Scribus

Filed under
HowTos

Although OpenOffice.org Writer offers many tools that allow you to create sophisticated layouts, you might want to use a dedicated desktop publishing application to lay out a brochure or a book. The latest version of the open source DTP application Scribus, 1.3.2, can import Writer's .odt documents, which makes Writer and Scribus a perfect combo for DTP work. Here's a brief overview of Scribus' essential tools and features from Writer users' point of view.

Deskbar Applet - Integrating Google Search on the Linux Desktop

Filed under
HowTos

I have been using this applet for some time now and am really impressed by the amount of search integration that is possible on the desktop. In fact, it wouldn't be far off if one compares Deskbar to its search counterpart - spotlight on OSX.

Book Review: MySQL Crash Course

Filed under
Reviews

If you want to learn SQL and aim to implement your database using MySQL then this is definitely the book to use.

LXF Interviews now online!

Filed under
Web

A new section for the site: the Linux Format Interviews. This is a full archive of recent interviews from the magazine (issues 62 to 73), featuring one-to-one discussions with major players in the Linux world including Alan Cox, Mark Shuttleworth and Michael Robertson. What goes on in the mind of a kernel hacker? Can Debian and Ubuntu co-exist? And what's the deal with all those 'K' names in KDE? Head over to www.linuxformat.co.uk/interviews/ for all the answers...

n/a
Syndicate content