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Monday, 26 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story RT-enhanced Linux stack aims at comms gear Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 7:55pm
Story Review: Pinguy OS 13.10 Beta 3 Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 7:47pm
Story GNOME's Virtual Filesystem Reaches Version 1.19.5 Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 7:38pm
Story Moonlight: Yet Another Linux Desktop Environment Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 7:30pm
Story New Kernel Vulnerability Affects Ubuntu 13.10 Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 7:25pm
Story It’s Not Just Android: 3 Upcoming Linux Mobile Operating Systems Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 7:16pm
Story Canalys: 80 percent of all smartphones shipped in 2013 ran Android Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 7:09pm
Story Linux 3.14 Supports MIPS' Latest CPU Core Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 7:03pm
Story Lenovo announces ThinkPad 11e laptops, Chromebooks for education market Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 6:58pm
Story Windows XP home users should upgrade to Linux -- not Windows 8.1 Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 6:48pm

Netbooks will boost adoption of Linux, says Novell CTO

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
SUSE

thestandard.com: A surge in demand for netbooks is helping drive business for Linux, as the devices are designed to be low-cost with smaller storage, according to Novell's chief technology and strategy officer for Linux.

GIMP 2.6.1 Released

Filed under
GIMP

GIMP 2.6.1 is a bug-fix release in the stable GIMP 2.6 series. Fixed: PSD file crashes PSD plug-in, JPEG Save Options Dialog does not remember, Gimp crashes creating a new image using a template, and some gif files will not be open.

Mandriva Linux 2009 Released

Filed under
MDV

softpedia.com: a special day for all Mandriva users. Why? Because the MANDRIVA S.A. just released into the wild the new and greatly improved version of the Mandriva Linux operating system.

Also: Mandriva packs in changes for new release

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Monitor your network with GroundWork Monitor Community Edition

  • OS and Virtualization or Virtualization and OS: Red Hat Analyst Day
  • Open-Source ATI R500 PowerPlay Support
  • Linux For The Masses: Are We There Yet?
  • Linux-to-BlackBerry sync tool goes beta
  • check your internet speed in Real-time (Ubuntu)
  • Mixing Windows and Linux: How Do You Manage Choice?
  • ubuntu, ATI and two monitors
  • Open source and software protectionism?
  • Changing open source terms bad move in a recession
  • Drupal 6.5 and 5.11 released

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Famous Sed One-Liners Explained, Part I

  • Network Performance Fine Tuning in openSUSE
  • Short Tip: grep with more than one expression
  • Bash Extended Globbing
  • Write a Perl module
  • PClinuxOS 2008 MiniMe Remastering
  • HowTo: Creating Desktop Shortcuts
  • PHP5 vs. daylight saving in Ubuntu 8.04.1 LTS
  • Nautilus Actions: Do just about anything to a file by right-clicking it
  • Forcing Ubuntu (and Debian) to upgrade to a newer distribution version
  • Blubuntu!

Mepis 8: It's a beautiful thing!

Filed under
Linux

eyemeansit.blogspot: As I mentioned in an earlier post, I used Mepis for quite a while, back in the Mepis 6 days. I have to say that I am very glad to see that they have gone back to using a Debian base and repositories instead of Ubuntu (which is Debian based). Why put one more layer of complexity between you and Debian?

Mozilla locks in Firefox 3.1 feature list

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. will use a several-week delay it recently added to the Firefox 3.1 schedule to build a private browsing mode and beef up the browser's address bar, the company said today.

two more mono interviews

Filed under
Software
  • Interview: Miguel de Icaza

  • Interview With Joseph Hill - Mono

After 2.0 release, Miguel de Icaza reflects on Mono's past and future

Filed under
Interviews

linux.com: Few free and open source software projects have attracted such a range of reactions as Mono. On one hand, as an implementation of Microsoft's .Net that's sponsored by Novell, it has been vilified both for the company it keeps and as a possible source of patent claims, should Microsoft choose to get nasty.

The ‘other’ value of open source in this economy

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: We’ve talked recently about how the down economy can be both good and bad for Linux and open source software in general. The more I consider the continued gloomy outlook, the more I am convinced the economic struggle will translate to increased interest, use and adoption for open source software.

Windows XP takes on Linux in the netbook market

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

guardian.co.uk: Shen -- who is keen on Linux -- said Asus had hoped sales of Eee PCs would be 50:50 between XP and Linux, but actually they were 60:40 in XP's favour.

Does OpenOffice.org Still Matter?

Filed under
OOo

blogs.eweek: For the past six years or so, I've watched the suite progress slowly but steadily toward the goal of being "just as good" as Microsoft Office. For my needs, OpenOffice.org has been better than good enough. Given the rise of these Web-based alternatives it's worth asking whether OpenOffice.org will continue to matter as we move forward.

Missing features in Amarok 2

Filed under
Software

kde.org: Today on IRC a user asked the following question: "Is there a list of 1.4 features that are still missing in Amarok 2?" As this question comes up rather frequently, I will try to shed some light on this topic here.

In search of bigger, stronger calculators

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If I had had SpeedCrunch or Qalculate! during high school, finishing homework really would've been child's play. From breaking down complex algebraic equations, to solving your calculus problems, to performing geometric computations and providing statistical answers, SpeedCrunch and Qalculate! are tools that offer quick solutions to difficult questions.

Debian postpones Lenny, calls for help

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: Debian, the granddaddy of Linux distributions, is in trouble. Its planned September release date for Lenny - its latest release - has come and gone and there is still no sign of the new product. It seems the Debian team is battling “too many release critical bugs” to make Lenny viable. And now the team is calling for help from the community to squash the remainder of these bugs.

Andreas Jaeger: Retiring from the openSUSE Board

Filed under
SUSE

Andreas Jaeger: I have served as chairperson of the openSUSE board the last year and would like to announce that I decided to pass the honours on for the next election period.

Pentagon: Open source good to go

Filed under
OSS

gcn.com: Military IT folks wondering if their use of Apache, Perl, Linux and other open source software is copacetic with the brass will soon get some answers from the Defense Department's Office of the Chief Information Officer.

Going to a Linux or Open-Source Show?

Filed under
OSS

practical-tech.com: Even before our recent economic crash, flying has become increasingly more costly. So have hotels, the price of gas, on and on it goes. Can you afford to go to a show? Can your company afford to send you to a show? The answer for most of us and our businesses is increasingly ‘no.’

Opera maverick is still making waves

Filed under
Software

theinquirer.net: TRIVIA QUIZ: Which browser was the first to implement tabs, integrated search, zoom, saved sessions, and runs on mobile phones and TVs? Hint: it wasn't Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Chrome.

Red Hat tells Wall Street it wants Main Street

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Commercial Linux distributor Red Hat hosted its annual analyst day in New York today, and as Wall Street continues to hemorrhage, the company couldn't have picked a gloomier time for the occasion.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more