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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 19 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 4:49pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 4:47pm
Story Why You Shouldn’t Have To Buy The $630 Super-Secure Blackphone In Order To Protect Your Privacy Roy Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 12:02pm
Story THE NEW 501(C)(3) AND THE FUTURE OF FREE SOFTWARE IN THE UNITED STATES Rianne Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 6:22am
Story Why XFCE is the Best Linux Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 4:30am
Story New Commercial Rolling Linux, Xfce the Best, and More Mint Rianne Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 4:26am
Story Red Hat Delivers Cloud Certification Plan, and Teams with HP Rianne Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 12:44am
Story Automotive Grade Linux group releases Tizen-based IVI stack Rianne Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 12:27am
Story CoreOS Launches Managed Linux Operating System as a Service Rianne Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 12:23am
Story Android Wear review: the everything inbox Roy Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 9:56pm

Review: Battle for Wesnoth 1.6

Filed under
Gaming

tuxarena.blogspot: After more than a year of constant development, The Battle for Wesnoth 1.6 was put out on March 22. This release comes with new graphics and unit portraits, a new campaign, called 'Legend of Wesmere', the possibility to log into the multiplayer with the forum account, and many, many other improvements.

First Look: Parsix 2.0r0

Filed under
Linux

news.softpedia.com: With the spring settling in more and more everyday and flowers blooming all over the place, we thought it would be appropriate to take a first look at the Persian flower distribution that goes by the name of Parsix 2.0r0.

Do Linux users pay a "Microsoft tax?"

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Steve Ballmer recently caught flack for essentially saying that Apple users pay an Apple tax of $500 for buying Macs compared to PCs. Does that mean that Linux users are forced to pay a Microsoft tax every time they buy a PC with Microsoft software on it?

Getting Rid of Nasty Flash Cookies on Linux

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Flash cookies are the secret nasties of using the Flash player on any platform. These are somewhat like the ordinary HTTP cookies that Web sites infest on our systems. Some HTTP cookies have useful purpose, but the majority of HTTP cookies are tracking cookies.

OpenGL 3.1 Released Plus New Audio Standard

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Nine months ago the Khronos Group released the specification to OpenGL 3.0. OpenGL 3.0 brought version 1.30 of the GL Shading Language, the introduction of Vertex Array Objects, texture arrays, more flexible frame-buffer objects, and a number of other graphical features.

Next GNOME Foundation Elections

Filed under
Software

vuntz.net: I's time for people to start thinking hard if they want to run for the elections. People usually don't think they can run for the elections; maybe they feel they're not involved enough in GNOME, or they don't feel like they are able to help, or there's some other random reason to not run.

Choosing Your Window Manager and Desktop Environment

Filed under
Software

maximumpc.com: The Linux graphical user interface (GUI) system may be very different from what you are used to if you are coming from a Windows or Mac OS X background. This guide will help you to choose a window manager/desktop environment by introducing you to several of them and addressing their strengths and weaknesses.

Chrome for Linux may shake up Firefox

Filed under
Software

mybroadband.co.za: Linux users can now get an early taste of Google's Chrome browser through the Chromium project. Although not an official Chrome release Chromium is an open source project on which the official Chrome browser is based.

Creative Labs Continues To Shaft Linux

phoronix.com: It has been a while since last mentioning the Creative X-Fi sound cards at Phoronix, but it's not because the Linux support is all nice and working now that Creative open-sourced their X-Fi driver, but rather things have stalled.

The First Linux Botnet

Filed under
Software

eweek.com: It never made sense that you could make a botnet out of Linux desktop users, but the people who built psyb0t knew its users don't pay attention to it.

Linux versus Windows - the truth

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

devoracles.com: Oh, here we go, yet another “is Linux better than windows”. The internet is full of this discussion, but sick of reading biased opinions I thought it was time to make an unbiased one!

GoblinX Releases G:Mini 3.0.rc01

Filed under
News

The GoblinX Project just announced the release of the G:Mini 3.0.rc01 (2.9.90).

A Short Introduction To Apt-Pinning

Filed under
HowTos

This article is a short overview of how to use apt-pinning on Debian and Debian-based distributions (like Ubuntu). Apt-Pinning allows you to use multiple releases (e.g. stable, testing, and unstable) on your system and to specify when to install a package from which release.

Inside Microsoft's landmark Novell deal

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

news.cnet.com: Just two days before Microsoft and Novell signed a controversial deal in 2006, the two sides still hadn't figured out a way to make peace over Linux without violating the licensing terms that govern the open-source operating system.

Taking your first Linux baby steps

Filed under
Linux

examiner.com: There is a wide range of distros for just about every conceivable purpose. Linux Mint is built to be very user friendly. It comes with great software for just about any task, codecs for multimedia enjoyments, and browser plugins for full Web participation.

Zenwalk 6.0: Not Quite Ready

Filed under
Linux

itnewstoday.com: In this Ubuntu world, distributions such as Zenwalk go relatively unnoticed, yet offer great features to those that know about them.

Test-Driving KDE 4

Filed under
KDE

workswithu.com: For three years, I’ve been a happy Gnome user. I’m still a happy Gnome user, but I’ve heard some buzz about KDE 4 lately and figured I’d give it a try.

How-To: Compile and Install VLC 0.9.8 from Source in Debian Lenny

VLC (VideoLAN Client) is one of the most popular video players on Linux, together with players like SMPlayer or Kaffeine. It plays many audio and video formats (including Xvid, DivX, H.264, Theora, WMV, Real Video, Ogg, MP3, FLAC, APE, AC3, WAV) together with DVDs and DVD ISO images.

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Linux Kernel News

  • Linux: Why do people hate systemd?
    systemd has caused an almost unending amount of controversy in the Linux community. Some Linux users have been unyielding in their opposition to systemd, while others have been much more accepting. The topic of systemd came up in a recent thread in the Linux subreddit and the folks there did not pull any punches when sharing their thoughts about it.
  • PulseAudio 10.0 Linux Sound System Released, Offers OpenSSL 1.1.0 Compatibility
    Today, January 19, 2017, sees the official release of the PulseAudio 10.0 open-source sound server for Linux-based operating systems, a major version that introduces many exciting new features. PulseAudio 10.0 has been in development for the past seven months, since the June 22, 2016, release of PulseAudio 9.0, which is currently used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions.
  • Linux is part of the IoT security problem, dev tells Linux conference
    The Mirai botnet? Just the “tip of the iceberg” is how security bods at this week's linux.conf.au see the Internet of Things. Presenting to the Security and Privacy miniconf at linux.conf.au, embedded systems developer and consultant Christopher Biggs pointed out that Mirai's focus on building a big DDoS cannon drew attention away from the other risks posed by insecure cameras and digital video recorders.
  • The Linux Foundation Brings 3 New Open Source Events to China
    LinuxCon, ContainerCon, and CloudOpen will be held in China this year for the first time, The Linux Foundation announced this week. After the success of other Linux Foundation events in the country, including MesosCon Asia and Cloud Foundry Summit Asia, The Linux Foundation decided to offer its flagship LinuxCon, ContainerCon and CloudOpen events in China as well, said Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin. “Chinese developers and businesses have strongly embraced open source and are contributing significant amounts of code to a wide variety of projects,” Zemlin said. “We have heard the call to bring more open source events to China.”

Dell Has Sold ‘Tens of Millions’ Dollars’ Worth of Linux Laptops

So popular Linux personality Bryan Lunduke, who recently took an hour out to talk to Dell’s Senior Architect in the office of CTO — try saying that with a mouthful of doughnut — Barton George. What did he learn? Well, for one, Dell says it has ‘no plans’ to start shipping its Linux-powered developer laptops with anything other than Ubuntu. Read more

Open-source voting is the answer to hacking concerns

Will we ever have a voting system that is completely error-proof and impenetrable from malicious forces? Not likely. But the security breaches that are increasingly a part of daily life serve as a call to action. Every day brings a new report of hacking or suspicious activity, and increasingly with fingers pointing to international actors. Whether it is statewide voter registration databases (Illinois and Arizona; some say more); national party organizations (the Democratic National Committee); utilities (Vermont’s Burlington Electric); or Russia’s state-run television station (RT) suddenly interrupting C-SPAN last week — the incident is still under investigation and not confirmed as a hack — it is all very unsettling and leaves us feeling vulnerable. Read more

The Many, the Humble, the Ubuntu Users

I have never been much of a leading-edge computing person. In fact, I first got mildly famous online writing a weekly column titled “This Old PC” for Time/Life about making do with used gear — often by installing Linux on it — and after that an essentially identical column for Andover.net titled “Cheap Computing,” which was also about saving money in a world where most online computing columns seemed to be about getting you to spend until you had no money left to spend on food. Read more