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Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu 10.04 ("Lucid Lynx") Review

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 10.04 ("Lucid Lynx") Review
  • Ubuntu 10.04 LTS will change Linux
  • Things to do after installing Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid
  • Ubuntu 10.04 LTS: A Great Release With A Few Rough Edges
  • Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx - A Fresh Look At What Is On Offer

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Do things in easy ways using DoThisNow
  • New Nathive Image Editor Beta Released
  • Tools that help PHP Programmers
  • Popular phpMyAdmin is on a roll
  • LinuxFest 2010 Wrap Up From The Fedora Project Booth
  • The Sad Story of XOOPS: Governance Fail
  • AMD Catalyst 10.4 For Linux Officially Released
  • Small business opportunity for open source gets bigger
  • ‘Taashee Linux Academy’ Inaugurated in Hyderabad
  • Microsoft's HTC License for Android: Why the Microsoft/Google War Shifted to Microsoft
  • New Linux Mini Distribution for Penetration Testing
  • PCLinuxOS 2010
  • Ubuntu and Debian Security Applications Review

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How-To: Grep Tricks for Linux Users
  • What does this USE flag do?
  • Automatic download and upgrade of packages In Debian/Ubuntu
  • Install MySQL Database Using Yum groupinstall on CentOS
  • Using The Debian Alternatives System
  • Ubuntu Lucid – Web Broser Plugins

Browser Protection: The Next Generation

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com/perlow: A bunch of people who left TalkBacks to this post believed that this announcement that I will primarily be running Windows in a virtualized mode — by using Linux as my primary OS — was either a

The Top 12 Native Linux System Monitoring Tools

Filed under
Software

daniweb.com: System Administrators (SAs) have a tough job. To assist those weary SAs in their quest to conquer their Linux systems, I've devised this list of 12 native Linux system monitoring tools that are always at my fingertips.

Getting Started with Ubuntu 10.04 released

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Getting Started with Ubuntu 10.04 released
  • Ubuntu 10.04 and the Dell D600
  • Installing Ubuntu 10.04 Survival Guide
  • Easy Integration of Ubuntu Machines into Enterprise Networks
  • What’s New in Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx
  • Upgrading from Ubuntu 9.10 to 10.4

Upcoming Fedora Test Days: preupgrade and Xfce!

Filed under
OS
Linux

This week we round out the Fedora 13 Test Day schedule, which has seen us run the gauntlet from NFS, through color management and SSSD, scale the heights of Graphics Test Week, and will see us come to a triumphant finish with the Preupgrade Test Day on Thursday 2010-04-29 and the Xfce Test Day on Friday 2010-04-30.

Sony Sued For Removal Of Linux Support From PS3

Filed under
Linux
Legal

ps3.ign.com: A class action lawsuit has been filed against Sony Computer Entertainment America for the removal of the 'Other OS' feature from the PlayStation 3.

SCO Files Motion for a New Trial

Filed under
Legal

groklaw.net: SCO has filed its "renewed" motion for judgment "as a matter of law", with its supporting memorandum. They ask the judge to rule over the heads of the jury and decide that the jury "simply got it wrong" when it ruled that SCO didn't get the copyrights in 1995 from Novell. In the alternative, they'd like a new trial.

Mandriva 2010 Spring backgrounds contribution

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com: Mandriva will provide 10 more backgrounds to complete official design of your favorite distribution. How to participate?

A Future Opening

Filed under
Linux

elevenislouder.blogspot: As I look through DistroWatch's list, I see a trend. The top ten at the moment are: Ubuntu, Fedora, Mint, OpenSuSE, Mandriva, Debian, PCLinuxOS, Sabayon, Arch, and MEPIS. Strangely, we find two relatively non-n00b distributions in there:

Linux on 4KB-sector disks: Practical advice

Filed under
Linux

Make sure Linux is firing on all cylinders

Get Slack!

Filed under
Slack

lockergnome.com: Like most X-MS Windows users, I did not come to Slackware directly. I took a round-about route through a few other distributions first.

Is the Microsoft-HTC patent deal more about Linux or Apple?

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Is the Microsoft-HTC patent deal more about Linux or Apple?
  • Microsoft Cross-Licensing Tactic May Get Teeth Pulled Soon

Novell claims to have hit 5,000 Linux app jackpot

Filed under
SUSE

siliconrepublic.com: Network software giant Novell has claimed it is the first Linux vendor to achieve 5,000 certified ISV applications and has increased its Linux market share against Red Hat, according to IDC.

Australian National Library uses open source for treasure Trove

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.com.au: The National Library of Australia has opted for an open source platform to drive its newly unveiled search engine.

Why Ubuntu excites me more than Windows or Macintosh

Filed under
Ubuntu

timesonline.co.uk: After a lifetime of high-tech disappointment, Hugo Rifkind has found true love, in Ubuntu Linux. As a new version launches, he attempts to share his excitement

Openbox Freedom Day

Filed under
Software

indlovu.wordpress: South Africa celebrated Freedom Day, Tuesday 27th April, so I spent the day attempting to squeeze freedom out of my aging 1.8ghz PC with 1Gb Ram.

Osmos For GNU/Linux Has Been Released

Filed under
Gaming

linux-hardcore.com: After a short testing beta Osmos from Hemisphere Games has finally arrived to GNU/Linux !

Linux tablet arrives in the UK

Filed under
Linux

theinquirer.net: TABLET UPSTART Fusion Garage has announced the availability of its Joojoo tablet in the UK, beating the cappuccino firm's delayed Ipad launch outside the US.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: OpenStack and Financial News

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."

Review: Fedora 27 Workstation

On the whole there are several things to like about Fedora 27. The operating system was stable during my trial and I like that there are several session options, depending on whether we want to use Wayland or the X display server or even a more traditional-looking version of GNOME. I am happy to see Wayland is coming along to the point where it is close to on par with the X session. There are some corner cases to address, but GNOME on Wayland has improved a lot in the past year. I like the new LibreOffice feature which lets us sign and verify documents and I like GNOME's new settings panel. These are all small, but notable steps forward for GNOME, LibreOffice and Fedora. Most of the complaints I had this week had more to do with GNOME specifically than Fedora as an operating system. GNOME on Fedora is sluggish on my systems, both on the desktop computer and in VirtualBox, especially the Wayland session. This surprised me as when I ran GNOME's Wayland session on Ubuntu last month, the desktop performed quite a bit better. Ubuntu's GNOME on Wayland session was smooth and responsive, but Fedora's was too slow for me to use comfortably and I switched over to using the X session for most of my trial. Two other big differences I felt keenly between Ubuntu and Fedora were with regards to how these two leading projects set up GNOME. On Ubuntu we have a dock that acts as a task switcher, making it a suitable environment for multitasking. Fedora's GNOME has no equivalent. This means Fedora's GNOME is okay for running one or two programs at a time, but I tend to run eight or nine applications at any given moment. This becomes very awkward when using Fedora's default GNOME configuration as it is hard to switch between open windows quickly, at least without installing an extension. In a similar vein, Ubuntu's GNOME has window control buttons and Fedora's version does not, which again adds a few steps to what are usually very simple, quick actions. What it comes down to is I feel like Ubuntu takes GNOME and turns it into a full featured desktop environment, while Fedora provides us with just plain GNOME which feels more like a framework for a desktop we can then shape with extensions rather than a complete desktop environment. In fact, I think that describes Fedora's approach in general - the distribution feels more like a collection of open source utilities rather than an integrated whole. Earlier I mentioned LibreOffice can work with signed documents, but Fedora has no key manager, meaning we need to find and download one. Fedora ships with Totem, which is a fine video player, but it doesn't work with Wayland, making it an odd default choice. These little gaps or missed connections show up occasionally and it sets the distribution apart from other projects like openSUSE or Linux Mint where there is a stronger sense the pieces of the operating system working together with a unified vision. The big puzzle for me this week was with software updates. Linux effectively solved updating software and being able to keep running without a pause, reboot or lock-up decades ago. Other mainstream distributions have fast updates - some even have atomic, on-line updates. openSUSE has software snapshots through the file system, Ubuntu has live kernel updates that do away with rebooting entirely and NixOS has atomic, versioned updates via the package manager, to name just three examples. But Fedora has taken a big step backward in making updates require an immediate reboot, and taking an unusually long time to complete the update process, neither of which benefits the user. Fedora has some interesting features and I like that it showcases new technologies. It's a good place to see what new items are going to be landing in other projects next year. However, Fedora feels more and more like a testing ground for developers and less like a polished experience for people to use as their day-to-day operating system. Read more

6 Reasons Why Linux is Better than Windows For Servers

A server is a computer software or a machine that offers services to other programs or devices, referred to as “clients“. There are different types of servers: web servers, database servers, application servers, cloud computing servers, file servers, mail servers, DNS servers and much more. The usage share for Unix-like operating systems has over the years greatly improved, predominantly on servers, with Linux distributions at the forefront. Today a bigger percentage of servers on the Internet and data centers around the world are running a Linux-based operating system. Read more Also: All the supercomputers in the world moved to Linux operating systems