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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tiny wireless-rich COM runs Android on 2.7GHz Snapdragon Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 8:44am
Story Linux Kernel 3.18.11 LTS Released With Bug Fixes And Improvements Install/Update In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Mohd Sohail 07/04/2015 - 6:51am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 11:32pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 11:30pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 11:26pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 11:26pm
Story XKCD's Comic About OSes Is Hilarious, Predicts Launch Date of GNU Hurd 1.0 Roy Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 10:08pm
Story 12 reasons to buy the best Android Wear smartwatch you’ve never heard of Rianne Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 9:50pm
Story Krita 3.0 Rianne Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 9:37pm
Story Unity 8 Won't Be Very Different Visually from Unity 7 Rianne Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 9:28pm

Review: Moblin 2.1

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Moblin, the much-hyped Linux-based OS from Intel and the Linux Foundation, released its version 2.1 in November 2009. This is a clean, visually appealing OS aimed at nettop and netbook users, with a desktop model that's far removed from traditional OS.

I'm Not The Only One Suspicious Of Adobe

penguinpetes.com: I audaciously stated that I believe that the Gimp is being sabotaged, and that Adobe is behind it. A much larger crowd is accusing Adobe of sabotaging HTML5.

So is ChromeOS a desktop winner? I think not.

Filed under
OS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: When Google announced their ChromeOS there was a flurry of comment and opinion on what this could mean for the GNU/Linux user and the future of free software. Our esteemed editor, Tony Mobily made a bold statement (albeit framed as a question) at the time that Google’s ChromeOS could turn GNU/Linux into a “desktop winner”. I’m not sure that it’s true.

Hands-on: semantic desktop starts to show in KDE SC 4.4

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica.com: Last week, the KDE community officially released KDE Software Compilation 4.4, a significant update of the open source desktop environment and its associated application stack. The new version delivers some user interface improvements, enhanced usability, new features, additional software, and a number of important bug fixes.

Pros and Cons of the Major Operating Systems

Filed under
OS

linux.bihlman.com: There are several options when it comes to choosing an operating system for your computer. Of course Windows is the overwhelming heavyweight in the market place and it isn’t a bad choice in some ways. Also looking for users are Linux, BSD and Leopard.

Sam Varghese Got It Wrong?

Filed under
Ubuntu

theopensourcerer.com: On the 10th of February I updated my original “Is Canonical becoming the new Microsoft?” post to make it clearer that what I was actually asking was about whether the company is becoming the next organisation that we love to hate. Today Sam Varghese has written about a conversation had with Mark Shuttleworth regarding my original post.

Linux Training Week: Setup and Compatibility

Filed under
Linux

zath.co.uk: If you saw our introductory post yesterday, you’ll know that this week on Zath is Linux training week! Over the next week, I’ll be using Ubuntu version of Linux in place of my norm of Mac OS X and Windows 7 to see how it stacks up against its rivals and whether it’s viable for the average computer user to make the switch.

MeeGo: Paradise lost for N900 hackers?

Filed under
Linux

Before today’s news I thought I had Nokia’s open-source strategy all figured out. The Symbian Foundation would be a bullet-proof mobile Linux for carrier customization and Maemo would be a gift from on high for power users.

Now I don’t know what to think…

More here...

Is the Linux dream a myth?

Filed under
Linux

thenakedcoder.blogspot: How many times have you heard the arguments about operating systems and why mine is better than yours etc?

The Dating Game, Linux-Style

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Can geeks find love? Certainly -- but extolling the wonders of GNU/Linux on the first date may not be the best way to go. On the other hand, just think of all the ways a Linux geek can say "I care":

Bringing the Magic to Linux with MeeGo

Filed under
Linux
  • Bringing the Magic to Linux with MeeGo
  • Linux Foundation to Host MeeGo Project
  • Intel and Nokia merge software to create MeeGo
  • Maemo + Moblin = MeeGo = Failure
  • Intel and Nokia set Linux up for MeeGo fail

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 341

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Mandriva Linux 2010 and its KDE 4.4 Upgrade
  • News: New Mandriva deployment, Squeeze freeze delays, No Freeze Rawhide, Miscellaneous Linux Goodness
  • Questions and answers: Smbclient
  • Released last week: NetBSD 5.0.2, Skolelinux 5.0, MINIX 3.1.6, Linux Mint 8 "Fluxbox" and "KDE64"
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.3 Milestone 2, Mandriva Linux 2010.1 Alpha 3, Ubuntu 10.04 Alpha 3
  • New distributions: Live Hacking CD, UST, CTKArchLive
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

I'm not driven by Microsoft hatred: Shuttleworth

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Canonical chief executive Mark Shuttleworth says his creation of the Ubuntu GNU/Linux operating system is not motivated in any way by animosity towards Microsoft.

Important Change to KDE's Security Policy

Filed under
KDE
Web

kdenews.org: Information about security vulnerabilities will no longer be published via the Dot at http://dot.kde.org.

Linux group LiMo growing

Filed under
Linux

Top 5 Best Linux Firewalls

Filed under
Software

thegeekstuff.com: As part of the contest we conducted recently, we got 160+ comments from the geeky readers who choose their favorite firewall.

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • TeleKast Is a Snazzy Open Source Teleprompter App
  • Is There an Ubuntu 10.04 in Your Future?
  • Gnome Nanny, a Parental Control System
  • When you can’t get into Wubi Ubuntu…
  • Cedega Install: City of Heroes Test Server
  • A Perfect Linux or BSD desktop distribution
  • Why Being a Package Maintainer Sucks
  • CentOS 5.4 : Synergy-Plus Crashing / Hanging on Linux Fixed
  • Gentoo at SCALE 8x
  • Firefox Turning Into A Multi-Browser
  • A primitive command-line ogg tag editor
  • New 3D Game Engine Targets Linux Gamers
  • NVIDIA Has Gallium3D Support In Fedora 13
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #180
  • How To Watch The Olympics Using Linux

Arch is hard to replace

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: There’s a good reason I stayed with Arch for so long: it was simple, easy, behaved exactly as it should and it didn’t break. Until now. I started looking at possible replacements. Over the last couple of days, I tried quite a few:

This is the route to hell

Filed under
Software

colin.guthr: So I would like to take a few minutes to talk about audio routing in PulseAudio. This is a oft misunderstood topic and it does sometimes seem like black magic and/or broken but, as always, it's pretty simple when you look at it properly.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.