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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Antergos, Manjaro, CentOS, Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora & OpenSUSE Performance Showdown Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 6:45pm
Story How a better understanding of open source can lower the risks Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 6:43pm
Story Croatia publishes Linux & LibreOffice manual Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 6:33pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 6:03pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 6:02pm
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 6:00pm
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 5:59pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 5:57pm
Story OmniRAT News Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 5:53pm
Story Toshiba Laptops To See Some Improvements With Linux 4.4 Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 5:04pm

3 Photo collage programs on Linux

Filed under
Software

linuxaria.com: It happens every now and then you have a set of photos and you want to do with them a background image with a collage of them, or perhaps a mosaic, it’s possible in Linux?

Live Out Adventure and Conquest In the Battle for Wesnoth

Filed under
Gaming

makeuseof.com: Years ago, when I was in high school, I remember getting very addicted to turn-based adventure strategy games like the popular Ultima series.

Tux Planet, an awesome source for Linux wallpapers

Filed under
Software

cristalinux.blogspot: I recently stumbled with this great French site, which contains some of the most amazing Linux wallpapers I have found. Many Linux distributions are featured, including the usual suspects, like Ubuntu, Linux Mint and Fedora, but also some other distros.

Bodhi Linux is Blossoming

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Not even three months ago Bodhi Linux was nothing more than a thought in my mind. Today Bodhi is a thriving young project. If you have visited our team page lately or seen our news posts then you know our small team has been steadily growing.

A second Opera 11.00 final build for Linux/FreeBSD

Filed under
Software

my.opera.com: We have just pushed a new Opera 11.00 release for Linux and FreeBSD to our ftp, deb and download servers. The reason we're doing this is that we just realized that the signing key for Debian packages expires the 23rd this month.

Hell Freezes Over: First Debian 6, Now...

Filed under
Gaming
  • Duke Nukem Forever to ship May 3
  • Duke Nukem Forever release date revealed
  • Duke Nukem Forever gets a release date

Why I Use Gentoo Linux

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.calindora.com: I’ll admit it right here: Gentoo is my primary operating system and remains my favorite distribution of Linux. That’s not to say I haven’t experimented with others. Arch, Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu have all been installed on my machines at one point or another. I’ve used Exherbo, and I think it has a lot of promise. Even so, I’ve always ended up back using Gentoo. What keeps drawing me back?

Openfire: Excellent, free open source chat server

Filed under
Software

infoworld.com: Easy install, easy administration, and ease-of-use make Jabber-based Openfire an ideal choice for small deployments

Sun's open source legacy

Filed under
OSS

h-online.com: The aftermath of Oracle's purchase of Sun and the subsequent forking of a number of open source projects, has highlighted the necessity to protect the integrity of the commons and to keep commercially sponsored open source projects honest, and true to the principles of free and open source software.

The openSUSE column #96 with Jos Poortvliet

Filed under
SUSE

linuxuser.co.uk: openSUSE community manager, Jos Poortvliet, talks about the latest in openSUSE projects and developments since the successful openSUSE Conference last October…

yesterday's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Revisited: 3 Newbie-Friendly KDE Distributions
  • Hacking, Old-School
  • So long, Drupal 5.x (End of Life Announcement)
  • How to Install VirtualBox 4.0.2 on Ubuntu 10.10
  • Easily Search And Manage PPAs With Y PPA Manager
  • There's No FUD Like an Old FUD
  • Installing a Debian GNU/Linux test server with VirtualBox
  • Expect Script Tutorial: Expressions, If Conditions, For Loop, and While Loop
  • How to make a great pattern in GIMP
  • Creating dynamic volumes with loop devices
  • How to Advertise your FOSS game
  • Add titles to OpenShot Video Editor projects
  • MySQL: Drive Your Performance Problems Away!
  • Diff with vimdiff
  • Text Watermarking and Watermark Recovery - Snowdrop
  • MintCast Interview
  • Radio Tray 0.6.2 comes with resume parameter, application indicator
  • Stuck in Windows
  • Moving duplicity (and Deja-Dup) backups
  • Ubuntu Laptop How to save current screen brightness settings
  • Search is One of the Strengths of GNU/Linux
  • Shadow Clones is a Fun Alien Shooter with Nice Soundtrack
  • Use the Levels Adjustment Tool in digiKam

Icinga (Monitoring Solution) Installation And Configuration On CentOS

Filed under
HowTos

Icinga is an enterprise grade open source monitoring system which keeps watch over networks and any conceivable network resource, notifies the user of errors and recoveries and generates performance data for reporting. Scalable and extensible, Icinga can monitor complex, large environments across dispersed locations.

There's No Such Thing As Web Standards

Filed under
Software
Web
  • The Truth Comes Out: There's No Such Thing As Web Standards
  • HTML Versioning Eliminated

Introducing Andreas

Filed under
Software

press.redhat.com: Red Hat provides an industry-leading support experience for thousands of open source applications and solutions. An exciting addition to Red Hat’s Support delivery capabilities is a new fault detection framework, Andrea.

Why would anyone use vim?

Filed under
Software

mikethecoder.com: I recently switched to vim full time after years of asking myself that question. It seemed like a huge percentage of the better hackers I came across used vim, but all I could see was “no mouse, no IDE goodies, no deal.” Why would anyone subject themselves to that? Here's why:

XPlanetFX - Incredible Tool for Rendering Real Time Earth Wallpaper in Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

techdrivein.com: XPlanetFX is an incredible tool for rendering high quality real time earth wallpaper in Ubuntu. XplanetFX comes with a handy GTK interface which makes things a whole lot simpler.

5 open source security projects to watch

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com: With network and software vulnerabilities growing at a perpetual rate, good security software can help defend against many of the large-scale threats that occur locally and from all over the Internet.

Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) 6 Released

Filed under
Software

linux-magazine.com: Kevin Fenzi, one of release-engineers for Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) and long time member of the EPEL Fedora Special Interest Group (SIG) discusses the EPEL 6 release.

Mutter: window and compositing manager for GNOME 3

Filed under
Software

ubuntulandforever.blogspot: GNOME 3 is the GNOME project's ambitious effort to take its desktop into the future. A key component of the desktop is the window manager, which defines much of the overall feel of the system.

Development of FFmpeg under new management

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: With over 100 audio and video formats, FFmpeg is at the heart of countless multimedia programs, and it is one of the show-piece projects on the open source scene. Originally founded by Fabrice Bellard, Michael Niedermayer started maintaining the project in 2004. However, a team of 18 developers has now ousted him.

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More in Tux Machines

Containers & Events

  • Video: Containers Should Contain... Right?
    Here's a presentation video from the very recent OpenStack Summit Vancouver 2018. The topic repeats what Dan Walsh was saying a couple of years ago. Again, this is talking about application containers using traditional kernel features like namespaces and cgroups... because as we all know, in the Linux kernel, containers are NOT a REAL thing. Just to be clear, OpenVZ... which is a mature out-of-tree patch for system containers that has been around and maintained for well over 13 years... does contain... but the hype is all around application containers like Docker and its work-alikes.
  • Updates in container isolation
    At KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2018, several talks explored the topic of container isolation and security. The last year saw the release of Kata Containers which, combined with the CRI-O project, provided strong isolation guarantees for containers using a hypervisor. During the conference, Google released its own hypervisor called gVisor, adding yet another possible solution for this problem. Those new developments prompted the community to work on integrating the concept of "secure containers" (or "sandboxed containers") deeper into Kubernetes. This work is now coming to fruition; it prompts us to look again at how Kubernetes tries to keep the bad guys from wreaking havoc once they break into a container.
  • Autoscaling for Kubernetes workloads
    Technologies like containers, clusters, and Kubernetes offer the prospect of rapidly scaling the available computing resources to match variable demands placed on the system. Actually implementing that scaling can be a challenge, though. During KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2018, Frederic Branczyk from CoreOS (now part of Red Hat) held a packed session to introduce a standard and officially recommended way to scale workloads automatically in Kubernetes clusters. Kubernetes has had an autoscaler since the early days, but only recently did the community implement a more flexible and extensible mechanism to make decisions on when to add more resources to fulfill workload requirements. The new API integrates not only the Prometheus project, which is popular in Kubernetes deployments, but also any arbitrary monitoring system that implements the standardized APIs.
  • An introduction to MQTT
    A few years ago, I was asked to put temperature monitoring in a customer's server room and to integrate it with their existing monitoring and notification software. We ended up buying a rack-mountable temperature monitor, for nearly £200, that ran its own web server for propagating temperature data. Although the device ostensibly published data in XML, that turned out to be so painful to parse that we ended up screen-scraping the human-readable web pages to get the data. Temperature sensors are fairly cheap, but by the time you've wrapped them in a case with a power supply, an Ethernet port, a web server, enough of an OS to drive the above, and volatile and non-volatile storage for the same, they get expensive. I was sure that somewhere there must be physically-lightweight sensors with simple power, simple networking, and a lightweight protocol that allowed them to squirt their data down the network with a minimum of overhead. So my interest was piqued when Jan-Piet Mens spoke at FLOSS UK's Spring Conference on "Small Things for Monitoring". Once he started passing working demonstration systems around the room without interrupting the demonstration, it was clear that this was what I'd been looking for.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Unleashed, Technical Board, 'Edge', Xubuntu and More

  • Ubuntu Unleashed 2019 and other books presale discount
  • Call for nominations for the Technical Board
    The current 2-year term of the Technical Board is over, and it’s time for electing a new one. For the next two weeks (until 6 June 2018) we are collecting nominations, then our SABDFL will shortlist the candidates and confirm their candidacy with them, and finally the shortlist will be put to a vote by ~ubuntu-dev. Anyone from the Ubuntu community can nominate someone.
  • Decreasing the complexity of IoT adoption with Edge as a Service model
    Last week, much of the IoT industry descended on Santa Clara, California, for the annual IoT World trade show. One of the exhibitors present were Rigado who Canonical partnered with earlier this year to deploy Ubuntu Core on their IoT gateways primarily targeted at commercial applications such as smart lighting and asset tracking. Rigado used IoT World as an opportunity to discuss the launch of Cascade, their new ‘Edge as a Service’ proposition, for commercial IoT. Cascade, which is offered as a simple monthly subscription, enables companies to focus on their business and what generates revenue rather than expending effort and resource dedicated to managing the infrastructure behind it. With many organisations looking at ways they can benefit from adopting IoT while removing perceived barriers, Cascade offers a low-risk, low-cost entry which in turn enables project teams to benefit from reduced development, support and no upfront hardware costs. The end result is a quicker path to IoT deployment and resulting ROI.
  • Xubuntu: New Wiki pages for Testers
    During the last few weeks of the 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) cycle, we had 2 people drop by in our development channel trying to respond to the call for testers from the Development and QA Teams. It quickly became apparent to me that I was having to repeat myself in order to make it “basic” enough for someone who had never tested for us, to understand what I was trying to put across. After pointing to the various resources we have, and other flavours use – it transpired that they both would have preferred something a bit easier to start with. So I asked them to write it for us all.
  • How to install Ubuntu Server 18.04
  • How To Install Firefox Beta in Ubuntu & Linux Mint

Kernel Coverage at LWN

  • XFS online filesystem scrubbing and repair
    In a filesystem track session at the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM), Darrick Wong talked about the online scrubbing and repair features he has been working on. His target has mostly been XFS, but he has concurrently been working on scrubbing for ext4. Part of what he wanted to discuss was the possibility of standardizing some of these interfaces across different filesystem types. Filesystem scrubbing is typically an ongoing activity to try to find corrupted data by periodically reading the data on the disk. Online repair attempts to fix the problems found by using redundant information (or metadata that can be calculated from other information) stored elsewhere in the filesystem. As described in Wong's patch series, both scrubbing and repair are largely concerned with filesystem metadata, though scrubbing data extents (and repairing them if possible) is also supported. Wong said that XFS now has online scrubbing support, but does not quite have the online repair piece yet.
  • Supporting multi-actuator drives
    In a combined filesystem and storage session at the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM), Tim Walker asked for help in designing the interface to some new storage hardware. He wanted some feedback on how a multi-actuator drive should present itself to the system. These drives have two (or, eventually, more) sets of read/write heads and other hardware that can all operate in parallel. He noted that his employer, Seagate, had invested in a few different technologies, including host-aware shingled magnetic recording (SMR) devices, that did not pan out. Instead of repeating those missteps, Seagate wants to get early feedback before the interfaces are set in stone. He was not necessarily looking for immediate feedback in the session (though he got plenty), but wanted to introduce the topic before discussing it on the mailing lists. Basically, Seagate would like to ensure that what it does with these devices works well for its customers, who mostly use Linux.
  • Using user-space tracepoints with BPF
    Much has been written on LWN about dynamically instrumenting kernel code. These features are also available to user-space code with a special kind of probe known as a User Statically-Defined Tracing (USDT) probe. These probes provide a low-overhead way of instrumenting user-space code and provide a convenient way to debug applications running in production. In this final article of the BPF and BCC series we'll look at where USDT probes come from and how you can use them to understand the behavior of your own applications. The origins of USDT probes can be found in Sun's DTrace utility. While DTrace can't claim to have invented static tracepoints (various implementations are described in the "related work" section of the original DTrace paper), it certainly made them much more popular. With the emergence of DTrace, many applications began adding USDT probes to important functions to aid with tracing and diagnosing run-time behavior. Given that, it's perhaps not surprising that these probes are usually enabled (as part of configuring the build) with the --enable-dtrace switch.

Wine: VKD3D and DXVK

  • Wine's VKD3D 1.0 Released For Running Direct3D 12 Over Vulkan
    The Wine project has announced the release of VKD3D 1.0, the first official release of this Direct3D 12 over Vulkan layer primarily developed at CodeWeavers. VKD3D is the approach Wine is pursuing for getting Direct3D 12 games from Windows working on Wine under Linux or also under macOS when paired with MoltenVK. For the VKD3D 1.0 release there are D3D12 demos now working but features are known to be missing and bugs are expected. Geometry and tessellation shaders are among the big ticket items still left to be implemented in future releases.
  • DXVK 0.52 Brings More improvements For Direct3D 11 Over Vulkan
    While VKD3D 1.0 is out today for Direct3D 12 mapped over Vulkan, the DXVK project for running Direct3D 11 over Vulkan is also out with a new release today. Most prominent to the new DXVK 0.52 release is initial support for DXGI 1.2, the updated Microsoft DirectX Graphics Infrastructure that brings various updates for drivers. The initial DXGI 1.2 support in the process fixes at least Bioshock 2 Remastered as well as Frostpunk.
  • Vkd3d 1.0 Released
    This is the first release of vkd3d. A lot of Direct3D 12 features are still missing and bugs are expected. The current version was tested mainly with demo applications. A number of features that are being worked on have been deferred to the next development cycle. This includes in particular geometry and tessellation shaders support, various shader translation improvements, as well as various improvements for core Direct3D 12 methods.
  • vkd3d for Direct3D 12 to Vulkan in Wine has released the first stable version
    Today, the Wine developers officially announced that vkd3d for translating Direct3D 12 to Vulkan in Wine has reached 1.0.