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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story [Wallpapers] Samsung Gear 2 / Gear 2 Neo and Galaxy Backgrounds Vol 26 Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 12:26am
Story MediaTek launches developer portal, debuts Android SDK Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 12:04am
Story The skinny on thin Linux Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:28pm
Story CipherShed: A replacement for TrueCrypt Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:23pm
Story Red Hat CEO announces a shift from client-server to cloud computing Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:21pm
Story PyPy 2.4 - Snow White Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:15pm
Story Brocade Unveils Vyatta SDN Controller Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:12pm
Story Six Clicks: Androids Apps on Chromebooks Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:11pm
Story Mentor Embedded Linux ready to roll on AMD SoCs Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:07pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 5:10pm

15 years of FreeDOS

Filed under
OS

h-online.com: Originally released on the 28th of June 1994, FreeDOS is now 15 years old. FreeDOS is a free open source DOS clone. The current release, version 1.0, was released in early September of 2006 and is licensed under GPL.

Fedora: A Hat with a History

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Fedora is a giant among giants, in the shadow of a giant from which it was born. But every giant is born of humble beginnings.

10 Awesome Features of Krunner in KDE 4

Filed under
KDE

maketecheasier.com: Krunner operates independently of the Plasma desktop system as a standalone application. It includes a ton of features that make it useful beyond simple command launching.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 309

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Report: LinuxTag 2009

  • News: Updated kernel for "Lenny", Slackware install guide, Fedora 12 "Constantine", free articles by BSD Magazine
  • Released last week: Linux Mint 7 "x86_64", Tiny Core Linux 2.1, linuX-gamers Live 0.9.5
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 3, Pardus Linux 2009 RC
  • New distributions: openArtist
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

EXT4, Btrfs, NILFS2 Performance Benchmarks

phoronix.com: The past few Linux kernel releases have brought a number of new file-systems to the Linux world. Being the benchmarking junkies that we are, we have set out to compare the file-system performance of EXT4, Btrfs, and NILFS2 under Ubuntu using the Linux 2.6.30 kernel.

Mozilla looking beyond Firefox 3.5

Filed under
Moz/FF

techradar.com: Firefox 3.5 is not even out for general release yet, but Mozilla are already suggesting that the trunk builds of its successor are 20-30 per cent faster and will build on the company's work on video integration.

The netbook belongs to Linux

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Why do Microsoft and vendors like ASUS continue to push the line that Microsoft Windows is the ultimate operating system for the diminutive ultraportable netbook market?

Amarok 2.1: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back

Filed under
Software

itnewstoday.com: When I first checked out Amarok 2.0 back when it made its debut, I didn’t think it could match up to Amarok 1.4.x in terms of usability or features. Now, I actually find myself preferring it to Amarok 1.4.x.

Is Red Hat a Takeover Target?

Filed under
Linux

kiplinger.com: What with Oracle CEO Larry Ellison showing a hefty appetite for enterprise software companies including those selling Open Source products the blogs and analyst ranks are buzzing with rumors that RedHat will get bought by Oracle. Or maybe by IBM as a defensive play? Or even possibly (gasp) by Microsoft?

Yakuake - Great Quake-Like Terminal Application for KDE4

Filed under
Reviews

A while ago I wrote an article called 13 Terminal Emulators for Linux, where I briefly reviewed all those popular shell-like applications and a few flavours of xterm or rxvt. In this article I will talk about Yakuake, a powerful terminal application for Linux, and also the KDE counterpart of Tilda in GNOME.

Eschalon Review - Commercial Role-Playing Game for Linux

Filed under
Reviews

Eschalon is a turn-based RPG (role-playing game), which tries to reproduce the feeling of classic RPG games. It's closed-source, available for Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, and it comes with a demo too. The full version is available as a download for $19.95.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Humorous Linux Posters - Part One

  • MS makes everybody happy
  • KOffice 2 Receives its First Update
  • FreeTumble 1.0 released
  • Music Slight of Hand
  • The pros and "conns" of Intel's ConnMan for Linux
  • New gentoo stuff, good stuff
  • Why is Ubuntu’s KDE 4 so bait – No really why?
  • My MacBook Pro (V5,3) And Gentoo Prefix
  • OLPC testing saturday && sugar on ubuntu
  • Mac4lin - Give that Mac OS X look to Linux
  • Why Oracle will continue to win
  • Five straightforward steps to vanquish Mono
  • Informercial Pitchman Billy Mays Dies at 50

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to listen to your music on hold, Asterisk

  • How to run KDE on Windows
  • Songbird addon for Ubuntu notification system
  • How to Completely Remove Mono on Ubuntu
  • Error Reporting in PHP
  • The Terminal: I/O Redirection
  • Fixing OpenDocument MIME magic on Linux
  • HOWTO : NTop on Ubuntu 9.04 Server
  • How to extract images from a word document using OpenOffice
  • Gentoo Openbox3 Configuration HOWTO
  • Mercurial, Apache, and OpenSuse 11.1

Is There a Perfect Linux Filesystem?

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: Most often, when someone talks about a filesystem or file system, they're referring to disk filesystems such as NTFS, FAT, ext2, ext3, ext4, ISO 9660 and many others but can also refer to network file systems such as CIFS and NFS. But, is there a perfect filesystem?

GNOME 3.0 may have more Mono apps

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: The next major version of the GNOME desktop environment, version 3.0, may contain more than the one Mono-dependent application than it currently does, according to GNOME Foundation member Dave Neary.

10 Signs You Are Ready For Linux

Filed under
Linux

penguinpetes.com: The title of this post is a search which came into my site, verbatim. It's a good way of looking at things for a change. So much ink is devoted to "Linux is ready for the desktop", that we tend to forget to view things from the other angle - what kind of user is right for Linux?

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #148

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #148 for the week June 21st - June 27th, 2009 is available.

nullmailer: simple send-only mail transport agent

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: Nullmailer is a minimal MTA (Mail Transport Agent) that provides mail delivery services to programs (cron jobs, system integrity checkers, log inspectors, etc.) in a host that otherwise does not require a full MTA like Exim or Postfix.

2 Minutes for Ubuntu Eye Candy

Filed under
Software
HowTos

buntfu.com: When taking a look at "CompizConfig Settings Manager" in Ubuntu it can be a little overwhelming when considering all the possible combinations available to us.

The Terminal: chown, chgrp, and chmod

Filed under
HowTos

thatlinuxguy.wordpress: Multiple people can be be doing several things each, all while logged into a single machine. With the rise of multi-user systems came a growing need for security and privacy.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)