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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firefox 28 released: Windows 8 Metro version removed at the last moment because it only had 1,000 users Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 6:43pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 5:28pm
Story Open source gets 'major role in Future Internet' Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 4:07pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 4:02pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 3:58pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 3:57pm
Story Open source introduces Polish schools to ICT Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 3:52pm
Story Docker Begins Straddling Free and Paid Services Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 3:48pm
Story Android Stomps Into Wearables Field Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 3:25pm
Story Ubuntu 14.04 Now Runs Well On The 2013 MacBook Air, Beats OS X 10.9 In Graphics Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 12:52pm

A primer on switching from Windows to Linux

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Linux What's involved in a switch from Windows to Linux? An editor and a couple of readers posed that question after last week's column. Given the proliferation of cheap Linux-based "netbooks" it is worth a systematic look.

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu Studio 8.10

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This tutorial shows how you can set up an Ubuntu Studio 8.10 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

more stuff

Filed under
  • Mandriva Smile

  • Finally: 64-bit Flash Comes to Ubuntu
  • When Ubuntu Breaks, Who’s to Blame?
  • Review: Zenwalk 5.2
  • Nexenta, Can you say SolaBuntu
  • Ubuntu 9.04 "Jaunty Jackalope" – What to expect
  • About Objects, Names and Variables

few more odds & ends

Filed under
  • Linux Void Episode 13 - Echo

  • Powerdevil: Looks Good
  • Bit More Customized Help for End Users
  • Enable Sudo insults and sl for some laughs
  • Why Apple and Google need to get into the Netbook business
  • Logitech G15 Keyboard

odds & ends

Filed under
  • openSUSE 11.1: Updates via PackageKit and PolicyKit

  • WUBI - Windows Ubuntu Installer - Tutorial
  • Ask NAS, Find, Squid, and EFS
  • Linux And Martial Arts Humor - Linus Torvalds Vs. Chuck Norris
  • FLOSS Weekly 47: Mifos
  • Open source & Linux
  • File downloads over the command line via CURL
  • Freedom at your disposal
  • How To Buy A Laptop
  • Screencapture made easy with GScrot
  • Jaunty Jackalope Alpha 1 Available
  • OpenSolaris 2008.11 RC2 Released

October 2008: Firefox, Opera gain & IE, Safari, Chrome drop

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Software Chrome amassed a higher market share than Opera in its first month, stealing market share from the speedy browser, as well as IE and Firefox. Only Safari gained as well. This month, things have flipped around completely, except for Microsoft.

The best laid plans, No. 73

Filed under
Linux I was going to spend some time tonight writing a big warm and fuzzy blog post about looking forward to Fedora 10 and all the good times ahead. That would have been awesome.

GIMP 2.6.3 Released

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GIMP GIMP 2.6.3 is another bug-fix release in the stable GIMP 2.6 series. Fixes include Plugin Map Color Range disappears from GIMP, zoom-focus better, and document history crash.


Filed under
  • Asus Eee, Ubuntu’d

  • Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex Sighting Inside Elastic Server
  • Review: Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' – Missed the mark?
  • My New Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex Installation
  • Asus Says Windows and Linux Eee PCs Getting the Same Return Rate?

today's leftovers

Filed under
  • KDE Video Cast Episode 2, Nov 22nd

  • WINE 1.1.9 Brings Improved Memory Performance
  • From the SuperComputing '08 Floor, Part 3
  • From the SuperComputing '08 Floor, Part 4
  • Musical Geek Friday #15: Kill -9
  • IBM buys code-converter firm in Linux move
  • using Drupal
  • Mind Maps: The Fedora Project
  • The Daemon, the GNU, and the Penguin
  • Extended Linux support from Red Hat
  • Ubuntu Linux Install Week at AIS Picture Gallery
  • Metrics of open source success
  • Create Read View Edit Word Document on Ubuntu
  • OpenSUSE 11
  • Public Open Source Companies: Much Ado About Nothing?
  • Five reasons Sun won't be acquired
  • The tanking economy and OSS
  • Damn you Gentoo Devs!
  • The Software Freedomometer

Ten Reasons To Get Fired Up Over Fedora 10

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Linux Over the next week we plan to post a series of blogs that explore ten examples from around our community, of people making a difference to free software through their work in Fedora.

some howtos:

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  • Gitting going with git: creating your first repository

  • python: writing binary file
  • make your BIOS love security
  • How the Linux Kernel Manages Virtual Memory
  • USB Hard drive spindown fix on Linux
  • An Executive Guide to Open Source
  • Parallels Desktop 4: Installing Parallels Tools with Ubuntu as Guest
  • A graphical way to MySQL mastery
  • Problem installing PECL PHP extensions while /tmp is secured
  • Customizing Firefox for Netbooks

The Gentoo Council

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Gentoo The Gentoo Council is a group of elected Gentoo Developers that are elected on a yearly basis by the developer body as a whole for the purpose of deciding on global issues and policies which affect the Gentoo Linux Distro as a whole or part.

Interview With Dries Buytaert

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Drupal In this interview we talk with Dries. In specific, we talk about: Building specialized commercial support for open source technology, Making cloud computing more viable for widespread use, and The relationship between Drupal and Linux distros.

Linux Should Copy Amiga

Filed under
OS Mark Shuttleworth made headlines not too long ago when he called for the Linux desktop to surpass Mac OS X in both beauty and functionality. I'm not much of an Apple fan-- I don't care for the Apple desktop. I think there is a better model to aspire to, and that is the AmigaOS.

Tactical Linux computer muscles up

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Hardware Eurotech subsidiary Parvus announced a more powerful version of its rugged tactical mission computer. The Parvus DuraCor 810-Duo runs Linux on a 1.5GHz Intel Core 2 Duo with 2GB of DDR2 RAM, and targets "high reliability" military and homeland defense applications.

Reliable Linux netbooks for Black Friday

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blogs.computerworld: Before charging out the door to buy one, though you need to think this through. You don't want to just rush out there and grab the first cheap machine you see. For example, if your ring size is '11,' than a 7" display netbook isn't going to be for you at any price.

Red Hat Fedora Claims It's the Leader in Linux

Filed under
Linux Counting Linux users is no easy task since there is typically no requirement for users to register their installations. Yet on the eve of its next major release, the distro produces new figures showing that it's ahead of rivals in total users.

YaST Mascot Winner Chosen! Say Hello to Yastie!

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SUSE The openSUSE Project and YaST team are happy to announce the winner of the YaST Mascot Contest. After extensive deliberation, the judges have chosen the Aardvark concept, submitted by Klára Cihlářová.

Backtrack Linux on a Thumbdrive: Can Security Testing Get Any Easier?

Filed under
Linux I have dealt with a lot of Linux distros since I first learned the power of my newfound penguin friend. He was free unlike a Microsoft or Apple product, had thousands of available programs (also free), and looked damn classy while he was in control of my computer.

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More in Tux Machines

GParted Live 0.27.0-1 Disk Partitioning Live CD Out Now, Based on GParted 0.27.0

Just one day after announcing the release of the GParted 0.27.0 open-source partition editor software, Curtis Gedak is informing us about the availability of the GParted Live 0.27.0-1 stable release. Read more

Netrunner Core 16.09 "Avalon" Is Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8, KDE Plasma 5.7.5

Today, October 23, 2016, the development team behind the Debian-based Netrunner GNU/Linux distribution proudly announced the release of Netrunner Core 16.09 "Avalon." Read more

today's leftovers

  • Acer updates Chromebook 15 with 12-hour battery life -- $199 exclusively at Walmart
    Chromebooks are not for everyone, but for many home users, it is absolute perfection. If you live in the web browser -- as many people do nowadays -- laptops running Google's Linux-based Chrome OS are a godsend because they are maintenance free. No need for confusing OS upgrades or anti-virus software. It just works, and it works well. Since they can now run Android apps too, they could become a serious threat to Microsoft and Windows 10. One of the most attractive aspects of Chromebooks is price -- they are often quite affordable. Today, Acer refreshes its 15.6 inch Chromebook 15 with a mind-boggling 12 hours of battery life. Best of all? It starts at $199. Yes, this model will get Android app support in a future update too.
  • Of Life, Linux and Karma Angels
    Angel filed appeal after appeal only to be denied on every attempt. Texas is an "at will" employment state so being terminated for cause can mean anything. Over the next few weeks, Angel became more and more fearful of losing her house, as she had just purchased it a year before. On top of that, her HP desktop had taken a nose dive into severe brokeness and that made it extra difficult for her to look for work. I put together a decent desktop for her and installed it that day, and was a Linux computer. Angel didn't have even the slightest problem with the new machine, and she wasn't particularly good at using one. So, let's put another slash in the falsehood that Linux is too hard for the everyday user. Most of them anyway. YMMV. To her glee, the OS picked up and configured her Epson all in one without her lifting a finger to do so. She almost clapped for happiness, stating that in Windows, installing that printer had been a nightmare, even with the included driver CD. And just to pinpoint the time frame for you, it was the summer of 2006.
  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided to launch on Linux in November, Mac version delayed
    Feral Entertainment has announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will be launching on Linux in November. Feral Interactive is currently working on the Linux port of the game. In September the game development studio announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided would make its way to two additional platforms: Linux and Mac. The Linux version of the game will most likely make use of OpenGL or Vulkan to power its graphics engine.
  • Mad Max: It Came From The Desert to Linux
    First of all, let me get one thing straight out of the way, so you know where I come from. I did not like the recent Mad Max movie. Like, not at all. Not that I mind the post apocalyptic theme. I used to like the older Mad Max’s just fine (probably the first one the best). The new one…meh. The Max character had virtually no back story (as thin as a sheet of paper) and he was just acting like a crazy person from beginning to end. The story’s premise was boring and just an excuse for endless and not so impressive action scenes. So there was nothing redeeming it. I know this is not the mainstream opinion of the movie (everyone apparently thought it was the best thing ever since sliced bread) so I can only attribute this phenomenon to either mass hysteria or simply a clear decrease in movie expectations. The Force Awakens‘ success, despite being a mediocre movie and certainly underwhelming compared to the original trilogy, certainly echoes the same trend. I guess you cannot beat nostalgia. Just tag a Millennium Falcon on and you get a free ride no matter how incoherent the story or the characters are.
  • Budgie Remix 16.10 Overview
  • I Switched To OpenSuse Tumbleweed :)
  • 50-day Moving Average Of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) At $76.67
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT) – Is this large market cap stock undervalued?
  • Fedora 25 new features, Perl removed from Build Root
    Fedora is the fast-paced bleeding-edge distribution of Red Hat. Fedora 25 is the second release of 2016 the other being Fedora 24. Let’s discover what lies in the future of this popular Linux distribution especially among developers.
  • "dnf update" considered harmful
    Updating a Linux distribution has historically been done from the command line (using tools like Debian's apt-get, openSUSE's zypper, or Fedora's yum—or its successor dnf). A series of crashes during system updates on Fedora 24 led Adam Williamson to post a note to fedora-devel and other mailing lists warning people away from running "dnf update" within desktop environments. It turns out that doing so has never truly been supported—though it works the vast majority of the time. The discussion around Williamson's note, however, makes it clear that the command is commonly run that way and that at least some users are quite surprised (and unhappy) that it isn't a supported option.
  • Supporting UEFI secure boot in Debian
    The Debian project can be accused of many things, but jumping too quickly on leading-edge technology is not one of them. That can be seen in, among other things, the fact that there is still not a version of the distribution that supports the UEFI secure boot mechanism. But, as Ben Hutchings explained during his 2016 Kernel Recipes talk, such support is in the works, and it will be implemented in a uniquely Debian-like manner.
  • The Lenovo Yoga Book Is the Future of Laptops, But It's Missing an Operating System
    For this review I spent a week with the Android version of Lenovo’s slick new backflipping laptop. Guts-wise it’s identical to the Windows 10 variant. They both feature Intel Atom x5-Z8550 processors, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of on-device storage, and 1920 x 1200 resolution displays. The Android version starts at $500 and the Windows version starts at $550.
  • Another Broken Nexus 5
    In late 2013 I bought a Nexus 5 for my wife [1]. It’s a good phone and I generally have no complaints about the way it works. In the middle of 2016 I had to make a warranty claim when the original Nexus 5 stopped working [2]. Google’s warranty support was ok, the call-back was good but unfortunately there was some confusion which delayed replacement. Once the confusion about the IMEI was resolved the warranty replacement method was to bill my credit card for a replacement phone and reverse the charge if/when they got the original phone back and found it to have a defect covered by warranty. This policy meant that I got a new phone sooner as they didn’t need to get the old phone first. This is a huge benefit for defects that don’t make the phone unusable as you will never be without a phone. Also if the user determines that the breakage was their fault they can just refrain from sending in the old phone.