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Tuesday, 26 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Wubi does the job

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: I took my first swing at Wubi yesterday. I’ve never really had the occasion to use Wubi, because I haven’t had a Windows-based machine in the house in so long. I knew of the project and I knew of the principle, but this was an introduction.

Confessions of an Ubuntu Fanboy

Filed under
Ubuntu

starryhope.com: Hi, my name is Jim and I’m a recovering Ubuntu fanboy.

Quake Live Tips

Filed under
Gaming
HowTos

biodegradablegeek.com: Quake Live is a free, manly game to play. QL is a version of Quake 3 that runs as a browser plugin for Firefox, Safari, and IE. It features a skill-matched game finder, a friend’s system, and other modern features.

Interview With Netbook Master from KDE Plasma

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

kdenews.org: Marco "Notmart" Martin is of course well known as one of the primary developers of the new Plasma Netbook workspace and for his habit of teasing us via his blog with news of new features for the X+1 release of our Software Compilation just before version X is released...

Who is Linux, really?

Filed under
Linux

locutus.us: On the face of it the answer to that question is quite simple. Who is Linux? Why it is Linus Torvalds, the inventer of the Linux kernel, or is it? Mabye some will say that Linux is Richard Stallman who is the instrumental in Open Source software. Others may even say that it is Mark Shuttleworth. So who is it then? Who is Linux?

Kubuntu Lucid Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxexperimentation.blogspot: I am an early adopter of KDE 4 and I welcome the radical changes it has made from earlier versions. Kubuntu seemed to be the winning choice because I have seen early KDE 4.4 reviews state that Kubuntu was the easiest and less buggy path to 4.4. In this article, I will be reviewing both Kubuntu Lucid Lynx the new KDE SC 4.4.

What is freedom anyway?

Filed under
Ubuntu

open.knome.fi: Today I’d like to ponder what freedom means for me and how I feel it actualizing. The Ubuntu community is definitely not the worst there is. However, there is lots of room for improvement. I’ve always felt that the Ubuntu community lacks communication.

Whither Linux drivers?

techgoondu.com: Linux users are often at the mercy of hardware vendors when it comes to device drivers. The open source community often needs to turn to reverse engineering to churn out drivers from proprietary ones.

The State of The X.Org Foundation 2010

phoronix.com: Along with announcing the X.Org Foundation board of director results, Bart Massey also issued the 2010 State of the X.Org Foundation report.

Network Analysis With Wireshark On Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Wireshark is a network protocol analyzer (or "packet sniffer") that can be used for network analysis, troubleshooting, software development, education, etc. This guide shows how to install and use it on an Ubuntu 9.10 desktop to analyze the traffic on the local network card.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • U1 Music Store – Store Music in U1?
  • the limits of virtual desktops
  • Gloobus is a sexy file previewer for your Gnome desktop
  • Debian Installer
  • Post-beta Opera fixes
  • Element OS- Your ultimate entertainment Linux OS
  • Debian & Ubuntu on my Acer Aspire One D150
  • Findwild
  • Midori 0.2.3 Released
  • Rekonq to replace konqi - On the menubar
  • SCALE 8x - Wish you were here

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Fix DSL pppoe connection problem with Network Manager in Ubuntu 9.10
  • Getting started with KDE development on openSUSE
  • Installing Linux Kernel Source
  • SHMMAX share Linux memory
  • Quick note to users installing ~arch KDE4 in Gentoo
  • ImageMagick: add text to many images
  • Move File Starting With A Dash

Happy Birthday BBS

Filed under
Web

tech.nocr.at: Just a few days ago, Feb 16 to be exact, in 1978 Ward Christensen and Randy Suess launched the first ever Bulletin Board System in Chicago.

Little Things That Matter: Ubuntu 10.04's MessagingMenu

Filed under
Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: Although people look for the big show-stopping killer-improvements when a new release of Ubuntu rolls around I find that it can be the small things which make the biggest difference.

The World Is Mourning The Loss Of Bruno Knaapen – Linux Advocate

Filed under
Obits

lockergnome.com: I joined Scot’s Newsletter Forum back in April, 2003 and took advantage of one of the forum’s Linux advocates. We knew him simply as Bruno, a man who knew Linux, and who had the patience to deal with us newbie’s who hounded him for advice.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 111 is out

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #111 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out.

Life with Linux: Adapting to the smaller screen on a netbook

sutor.com: This last week my son and I were on vacation and I took along a Simmtronics 10.2 netbook running Ubuntu Linux 9.10 Remix so I could have reasonable access to the Internet. Here are some observations about getting the most of that smaller screen while running the Ubuntu desktop.

From OS X to Ubuntu: 2 Years Later

Filed under
Ubuntu

starryhope.com: A little more than 2 years ago, I made a switch away from Mac OS X to Ubuntu Linux. Since then, I have used Ubuntu Linux about 98% of the time on my personal and work computers.

Linux Training Week: Customisation

Filed under
Linux

zath.co.uk: One of the great things about any Linux distribution is the ability to customise the look and feel of it to your taste. Throughout the past week, I’ve discussed software availability, compatibility and ease of use, but I haven’t gone as far as modifying the way I use it.

The state of (high definition) video editing on Linux

Filed under
Software

blog.thesilentnumber.me: We have extremely promising open source media editing applications for Linux like the Jokosher audio editor and PiTiVi video editor, both built on the powerful GStreamer framework. While things may be looking up, one shortcoming is an ever increasing problem that deserves some more serious attention.

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Games: The Spicy Meatball Saves The Day, Uebergame, DwarfCorp

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.