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About Tux Machines

Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE Ships 4.13 Beta 3 Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 8:56pm
Story ATM operators eye Linux as alternative to Windows XP Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 8:45pm
Story Linux Mint 17 to Be Called “Qiana,” Release Date Announced Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 8:30pm
Story Today in Techrights Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 5:44pm
Story Open Source Apache and Nginx Web Servers Get More Secure Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 11:42am
Story Trying Out The Debian 8.0 Jessie Installer Alpha 1 Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 11:36am
Story Android-x86 Just Might Make a Good Linux Desktop Alternative Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 11:22am
Story Trojita 0.4.1, a security update for CVE-2014-2567 / Announcing Geary 0.6.0 Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2014 - 11:17am
Story KDE 4.13 Makes It Into Kubuntu 14.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 10:53pm
Story Blender 2.70 Release Notes Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2014 - 8:49pm

Audioplayers are easy, right?

Filed under
Software I love music. When I moved to Linux I started out with XMMS, a WinAmp Clone, no surprises there, things worked as I was used to. Along came the "Library based" players that offered so much more.

lns: Simple symbolic links

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Software Sometimes an idea so simple, so brilliant, so obvious crosses your path and you think, "D'oh! Why didn't I come up with this several decades ago?" This morning, I once again experienced that sense of awe and shame, when fellow staffers Ryan and Clint pointed me to lns.

What’s new in 3.0

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OOo On October 13 of this year, 3.0 was released. This highly anticipated release provides a number of enhancements. Vincent Danen shares some of the best new features.

Software as a Subversive Activity, Part 2: Open-Source Ticket Splitting

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jdeeth.blogspot: Microsoft dominates three big branches of the computing experience: the operating system, the browser, and the office suite. At the top of the ticket, the operating system race, Microsoft wins in a landslide with about 90 percent. The Mac is at around 8 and Linux is pushing toward 1.

Is Ubuntu Family Friendly?

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Ubuntu Yesterday while I was browsing Ubuntu Forums I came across a thread posted by someone named EssexJames. He recounts a recent experience with showing his 10 year old son Ubuntu. “Daddy, what’s Brainf**k?” he said.

Ding, dong SCO is dead

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OS Though SCO still has the option to appeal, a federal district court judge Dale Kimball has now effectively written its death sentence in the form of a somewhat blistering final judgment, as Groklaw reports.

Fedora 10: the GNU/Linux Desktop Steps Forward

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Linux Any release of a GNU/Linux distribution marks a milestone in a continuous cycle of software development. However, Fedora 10 promises to be a larger milestone than most, both for its development community and users, according to Paul W. Frields, the Fedora leader and chair.

Is open source killing developers’ ability to cash in?

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OSS Today I read an article on Slashdot about a software maker concerned that open source software was causing a “race to zero” (as in the price of software). His problem was that his company produced a piece of software worth $5K one year and, because open source developers were creating the same tools and giving it away, the next year the software was worth $0.

2008 State Of The Penguin Report

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linuxlock.blogspot: The computer user and the operating system are melded into one, once he or she sits down at the machine. It is the user that makes an operating system successful or not. If you care to disagree, let's take a look at general public opinion.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 279

Filed under

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature stories: Novell wins and SCO loses, Linux netbooks hit store shelves

  • News: Fedora claims 9.5 million users, openSUSE plans for Zypper 2, Gentoo outlines Council activities, sidux celebrates second birthday, Shift Linux changes direction
  • Released last week: Mandriva One 2009 "Xfce", Yellow Dog Linux 6.1, PC/OS 2009
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 10, openSUSE 11.1 RC1
  • Site news: New DistroWatch Weekly editor announced
  • New additions: CrunchBang Linux
  • New distributions: SecurPC
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Ubuntu vs. OpenSolaris vs. FreeBSD Benchmarks

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OS Over the past few weeks we have been providing several in-depth articles looking at the performance of Ubuntu Linux. In this article, we are now comparing the 64-bit performance of Ubuntu 8.10 against the latest test releases of OpenSolaris 2008.11 and FreeBSD 7.1.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #118

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Ubuntu The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #118 for the week of November 16th- November 22nd, 2008 is now available. In This Issue: Jaunty Jackalope Alpha 1 released, The Ubuntu Hall of Fame, and Ubuntu for the Holidays.

The Netbook Newbie's Guide to Linux

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  • Netbooks + Ubuntu: On fence about form factor; OS solid

  • ASUS CEO Says Linux Netbook Returns On Par With Windows
  • The Netbook Newbie's Guide to Linux

Linux has moved away from geekdom

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Linux Linux has made some very big improvements over the past few years and I have always said that it is ready for everyone to use, if they can only get out of the proprietary mindset.

I've Got A Penguin in My Briefs

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Linux Steven A. Reisler explains his experience with GNU/Linux, and how he has completely freed his computing environment from proprietary software.

Set your Linux alternative programs.

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There are many things you can do in Linux and there are many ways to do them. You can have several different programs all able to do the same task and all installed at the same time. So how do you choose which one is the default program?

odds & ends

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  • Henry Ford Would Have Hated Linux

  • In A Tighter Economy, Why Not Open Source In All Government Offices?
  • Microsoft vs. Open Source: Differences Explained by the Real World
  • Linux Community to Redmond - Do The Right Thing
  • My Eee Desktop
  • Ubuntu on the Aspire One
  • Wallpaper displaying weather of your city
  • Clean up your filesystem using FSlint
  • How To Convert Fonts To .ttf Format In Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Notifications using libnotify-bin

some shorts

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  • Worldwide Mandriva 2009 Install Fest

  • Is Ubuntu for you?
  • Ubuntu's Impressive Numbers
  • The Linux Action Show! Season 9 Episode 9
  • Drupal on cover of Information Week

15 Inspiring Steve Jobs Quotes for FOSS Developers to Ponder

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Mac Steve Jobs, Apple's co-founder and CEO, is the genius behind some of the most innovative and influential tech products in history. It's a known fact that Free and Open Source software developers are inspired by the words of Stallman and Torvalds, but I think it won't hurt if they will also reflect on some of these great quotes by Steve Jobs:

Make ‘Frets On Fire’ Even Better With Mods

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Software Frets on Fire is a rhythm game from the likes of Guitar Hero and Rock Band. In short, Frets on Fire is a free, open-source, multi-platform rhythm game.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Security News

  • How your DVR was hijacked to help epic cyberattack
    Technology experts warned for years that the millions of Internet-connected "smart" devices we use every day are weak, easily hijacked and could be turned against us. The massive siege on Dyn, a New Hampshire-based company that monitors and routes Internet traffic, shows those ominous predictions are now a reality. An unknown attacker intermittently knocked many popular websites offline for hours Friday, from Amazon to Twitter and Netflix to Etsy. How the breach occurred is a cautionary tale of the how the rush to make humdrum devices “smart” while sometimes leaving out crucial security can have major consequences.
  • Find Out If One of Your Devices Helped Break the Internet
    Security experts have been warning for years that the growing number of unsecured Internet of Things devices would bring a wave of unprecedented and catastrophic cyber attacks. Just last month, a hacker publicly released malware code used in a record-breaking attack that hijacked 1.5 million internet-connected security cameras, refrigerators, and other so-called “smart” devices that were using default usernames and passwords. On Friday, the shit finally hit the fan.
  • Once more, with passion: Fingerprints suck as passwords
    Fingerprints aren’t authentication. Fingerprints are identity. They are usernames. Fingerprints are something public, which is why it should really bother nobody with a sense of security that the FBI used them to unlock seized phones. You’re literally leaving your fingerprints on every object you touch. That makes for an abysmally awful authentication token.
  • Strengthen cyber-security with Linux
    Using open source software is a viable and proven method of combatting cyber-crime It’s encouraging to read that the government understands the seriousness of the loss of $81 million dollars via the hacking of Bangladesh Bank, and that a cyber-security agency is going to be formed to prevent further disasters. Currently, information security in each government department is up to the internal IT staff of that department.
  • Canonical announces live kernel patching for Ubuntu
    Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, has announced that it will provide a live kernel patching services for version 16.04 which was released in April.
  • Everything you know about security is wrong
    If I asked everyone to tell me what security is, what do you do about it, and why you do it. I wouldn't get two answers that were the same. I probably wouldn't even get two that are similar. Why is this? After recording Episode 9 of the Open Source Security Podcast I co-host, I started thinking about measuring a lot. It came up in the podcast in the context of bug bounties, which get exactly what they measure. But do they measure the right things? I don't know the answer, nor does it really matter. It's just important to keep this in mind as in any system, you will get exactly what you measure. [...] If you have 2000 employees, 200 systems, 4 million lines of code, and 2 security people, that's clearly a disaster waiting to happen. If you have 20, there may be hope. I have no idea what the proper ratios should be, if you're willing to share ratios with me I'd love to start collecting data. As I said, I don't have scientific proof behind this, it's just something I suspect is true.
  • Home Automation: Coping with Insecurity in the IoT
    Reading Matthew Garret’s exposés of home automation IoT devices makes most engineers think “hell no!” or “over my dead body!”. However, there’s also the siren lure that the ability to program your home, or update its settings from anywhere in the world is phenomenally useful: for instance, the outside lights in my house used to depend on two timers (located about 50m from each other). They were old, loud (to the point the neighbours used to wonder what the buzzing was when they visited) and almost always wrongly set for turning the lights on at sunset. The final precipitating factor for me was the need to replace our thermostat, whose thermistor got so eccentric it started cooling in winter; so away went all the timers and their loud noises and in came a z-wave based home automation system, and the guilty pleasure of having an IoT based home automation system. Now the lights precisely and quietly turn on at sunset and off at 23:00 (adjusting themselves for daylight savings); the thermostat is accessible from my phone, meaning I can adjust it from wherever I happen to be (including Hong Kong airport when I realised I’d forgotten to set it to energy saving mode before we went on holiday). Finally, there’s waking up at 3am to realise your wife has fallen asleep over her book again and being able to turn off her reading light from your alarm clock without having to get out of bed … Automation bliss!

Microsoft Corruption, Rejections, and Struggles

  • Microsoft licensing corruption scandal in Romania has ended on October 3rd
    This scandal covers buying Microsoft licensees for Romanian administration from 2004 to 2012 for total 228 millions USD. During the investigation was found that more than 100 people, former ministers, mayor of Bucuresti and businessman are involved in this corruption scandal and more than 20 millions euro are paid as bribes.
  • 49ers Colin Kaepernick, Chip Kelly review Microsoft Surface tablets, which Bill Belichick is ‘done’ using
    Ranting about Microsoft’s unreliable, sideline tablets is not a top priority for 49ers coach Chip Kelly and quarterback Colin Kaepernick, not with a five-game losing streak in tow for Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. But both Kelly and Kaepernick confirmed this week that they’ve experienced problems with the Microsoft Surface tablets. They’re just not as fed up with them as New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick, who’s lambasted the imperfect technology for years and finally declared this week: “I’m done with the tablets.”
  • Windows: When no growth is an improvement
    Research firms like IDC and Gartner have continued to forecast contraction, not expansion, in the PC business. Only when enterprise migrations to Windows 10 kick into gear do analysts see a reversal of the industry’s historic slump. That isn’t expected to happen until next year.

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" & 8.15 "Nev" Receive Latest Debian Security Updates

After releasing the first Test build of the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" operating system a couple of days ago, today, October 23, 2016, the Parsix GNU/Linux development team announced the availability of new security updates for all supported Parsix GNU/Linux releases. Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" is the current stable release of the Debian-based operating system, and it relies on the Debian Stable (Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie") software repositories. On the other hand Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" is the next major version, which right now is in development, but receives the same updates as the former. Read more