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Sunday, 26 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Rugged mini-PC runs Android on Via’s Cortex-A9 SoC Rianne Schestowitz 19/09/2014 - 6:59am
Story Newest Androids will join iPhones in offering default encryption, blocking police Rianne Schestowitz 19/09/2014 - 6:53am
Story X.Org Server Shatter Project Fails Rianne Schestowitz 19/09/2014 - 6:44am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2014 - 11:42pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2014 - 11:41pm
Story Fedora 21 Alpha to release on Tuesday Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2014 - 11:21pm
Story Teaching open source changed my life Rianne Schestowitz 18/09/2014 - 11:16pm
Story KDE Touchpad configuration ported to Frameworks 5 Rianne Schestowitz 18/09/2014 - 11:11pm
Story Intel P-State vs. CPUFreq Benchmarks On The i7-5960X Rianne Schestowitz 18/09/2014 - 11:05pm
Story Learn Ubuntu - The Unity Launcher Rianne Schestowitz 18/09/2014 - 11:01pm

OpenSolaris: No Standing Still On A Moving Train

Filed under
OS

informationweek.com/blog: Yesterday I sat down on the phone with Larry Wake -- official title: Group Manager, Solaris Strategic Marketing -- to chat about OpenSolaris. I ended up with an answer to an unexpected question:

Death knell heard for Microsoft and really all proprietary efforts

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

geek.com: Open source is headed our way in force. That’s the message coming out of every major manufacturing company today. No longer are companies willing to pay the price by catering to Microsoft and its proprietary architectures and related policies and procedures.

Contributing upstream, it will make or break Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software

v00d00.net: Many fully fledged distros have drawn praise for bringing something new to the linux arena, while relying on the solid foundation of a mother distro. There has been much comment in the community about these new distros taking the mother distros work, adding to it and pushing out releases without passing those additions back to the mother distro.

Benchmark for Linux desktops

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: Almost two years after its initial announcement, the Linux Solution Group (LiSoG) has now presented specificationsPDF for its OSDtBench (Open Source based Desktop Benchmark) desktop benchmark suite and demonstrated a prototype at LinuxTag 2009 in Berlin.

The Best Docks on the Linux Coast

Filed under
Software

berkeleylug.com: Even Mark Shuttleworth is willing to admit that OSX has a pretty nice usable interface that is a good goal for desktop Linux to beat in the coming year or so. Even if you don’t want to replicate the mac, you might still be interested in replacing one of the two Gnome taskbars with a dock.

How to Customize Your Linux Desktop - From GTK to Compiz

Filed under
Software
HowTos

maximumpc.com: The days of ugly Linux desktops are a thing of the past. Modern distros include many tools and options that enable them to look good and be more useful.

Is Ubuntu Linux Ready for the Enterprise?

Filed under
Ubuntu

eweek.com: Ubuntu is the leader in the Linux environment and it's slowly making its way into the mainstream. But is it ready to tackle the enterprise?

What Linux needs to improve for the desktop

Filed under
Linux
Software

toolbox.com/blogs: There were a few areas where desktop Linux needs some improvement. I may have been lucky as a lot of these problems I have not personally experienced, some of them I have and some of them I remember from years back but are no longer relevant.

A quick look at Fedora 11

Filed under
Linux

bmc.com: The reason I was personally looking at Fedora 11 is that I wanted to see what the very latest MAPI setup in Linux looked like. Fedora is not only the most recent release of the major distros: Fedora also prides itself on being the most bleeding edge of the Distros.

Reviewed: KOffice 2.0

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Free software is often developed with the mantra 'release early, release often'. This is a great idea, because new tools can be tested, trialled and critiqued as they're developed, rather than waiting for some arbitrary point of readiness. Which brings us to KOffice 2.0.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Life With A Bleeding-Edge Browser

  • Chrome beta 3.0.190.2
  • Berlin art colleges switch to Linux
  • Open source software saves costs
  • Microsoft Cuts Off its Nose...
  • Should Oracle's Linux strategy be...Ubuntu?
  • Mullenweg: Open Source Trumps The Cloud
  • How Manipal Got Its First Linux (Fedora) Server
  • A Week with Windows
  • Red Hat Challenges Oracle on Java Openness
  • My Run In with CentOS at LinuxTag
  • Random screensavers for the console
  • Installation: Resizing Windows before proposing Linux partitions
  • Rock your box with Rockbox
  • At what stage of life is the open source industry?
  • Red Hat: Four Times Novell’s Open Source Revenue?
  • Red Hat's Complaint, as text
  • 16 Videos from Red Hat
  • HP's Linux-based Printer connects to the web
  • Open source show gears up with 200 sessions

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Install Software from a Tarball in Linux

  • Change Ubuntu Jaunty Top-Level Menu Names (Gnome)
  • Setup Xen 3.4.1 Dom0 on top of Ubuntu 9.04 via UDEV patch
  • How to Run Android Applications on Ubuntu
  • Install And Use Specto In Ubuntu Linux
  • Getting Help from Console
  • Determining What's Been Changed on RPM Based Systems
  • Creating a template for postcards in OpenOffice
  • HOWTO : Cacti on Ubuntu 9.04 server
  • Configure Bacula for Open Source Backups
  • Using Built-In Revision Control in Firewall Builder
  • Getting the most out of OpenOffice.org Writer
  • Configuring hotkeys in Lenny
  • Installing Damn Small Linux To Hard Disk
  • Resize Images in Linux with ImageMagick

Netbook Linux Screencaster Smackdown

Filed under
Reviews

If you’re using Linux you may have already read TuxArena’s excellent rundown of three highly regarded screencasting apps. But what if you’re using a netbook like an Eee PC?

Do the Linux Jig!

Filed under
Ubuntu

happyvenus.net: I’ve been fighting with the want to use Ubuntu for like three years now. Not just use Ubuntu, but make it my primary OS of choice.

Kaspersky releases beta of Linux antivirus

Filed under
Software

computerworlduk.com: IT security firm Kaspersky Lab has released the beta version of its antivirus software for Linux file systems.

GNU/Linux: What Does “Free” Mean?

Filed under
OSS

blog.eracc.com: I have been pondering the meaning of “free” in association with Free Open Source Software (FOSS) in general and GNU/Linux in particular. If one asks a FOSS advocate what free means in regard to these one might hear the reply, “Free as in beer!” and/or “Free as in freedom!”.

View the stars in Linux with Stellarium

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: If you are learning about the stars in school, an amateur sky watcher, or a meteorologist in the making you need to know your stars. To really see the stars you can visit a real planetarium, you can break out your serious telescope, or you can install and fire up a desktop application like Stellarium.

Brockmeier: Addressing Linux Challenges at LinuxCon

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

linuxfoundation.org: Joe "Zonker" Brockmeier is a stable fixture in the Linux community, spreading the word about Linux and open source to all who will listen. I recently talked to Zonker to find out what topics he plans to cover in his address at our first LinuxCon event on September 21-23.

Ubuntu Wiki - not shareable?

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

happyassassin.net: I may be missing something here (be great if I am), but it seems to me that the content of the Ubuntu Wiki - which contains some great stuff - is not licensed under one of the common ’shareable’ licenses, like CC, GFDL or OPL.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more