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Thursday, 23 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Mozilla marks June for Firefox 3.5 release candidate

  • openSUSE Weekly News - openSUSE Community Week special edition
  • Konsole Fonts
  • Telethon Taps Open Source to Save on Costs
  • Vincent Danen: My first 90 days at Red Hat
  • Linux development service cracks DaVinci code
  • The Linux VGA Arbiter Has Been Revived
  • R.I.P. Fravia
  • #! CrunchBang Linux Review
  • Testing out Arch Linux
  • Take-Two sues over death of Duke Nukem Forever
  • Fedora Art Team becomes Fedora Design Team
  • Activists push city endorsements of open source
  • Landscape 1.3 released for Ubuntu management
  • KDE 4.3 Beta 1 - looking pretty
  • Ten key web-based Linux tools
  • SimplyMEPIS 8.0 on Toshiba Satellite
  • The EU Parliament still sticks with Microsoft. Here’s why.
  • Elug and SA Linux join forces
  • Ubuntu One; what's in a name?
  • Red Hat 'inevitably' a target -- stock jumps 8%

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using the Bash complete Command

  • Count the Number of Files in a Directory in Linux
  • openSUSE NetworkManager and keyring
  • Lock screen on lid close
  • Command Line Basics: Navigating the File System
  • Browsing a FTP server in Nautilus
  • How to Use the Second Network Port on Your Computer
  • Create your own version of Fedora with Revisor
  • Creating Our First Module using Drupal 6 (Part1)
  • vnstat on openSUSE

Windows 7: 7 Reasons Not to Get too Excited

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxpromagazine.com: It’s official: Windows 7 will be on the shelves just in time for the Christmas season. From an Open Source perspective, this is nothing ground-breaking: It’s just the same old Windows.

USB display technology heading for Linux

Filed under
Hardware

desktoplinux.com: Linux users should soon be able to use USB-connected monitors that incorporate DisplayLink's chips. DisplayLink has released Linux versions of its USB monitor source code under LGPL, and has partnered with Novell and the Linux Driver Project to develop drivers for desktops and mobile devices.

Open Source You Can Use, May 2009 Edition

Filed under
Software

informationweek.com/blog: Sound, video, distros and programming all figure into this month's roundup of open source goodies.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.30 - Storage improvements

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The next kernel version is to provide all that's necessary to convert, for example, a RAID 5 into a RAID 6 and vice versa. There are changes to the block layer designed to speed up the system, and new and improved drivers will offer better SAS support.

Linux Distros That Don’t Suck

Filed under
Linux

tech.nocr.at: I have had many people email me about the best distro out there. The only answer I have for them is “depends on what you want to do”.

When Will it Really Be the Year of Linux?

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com: It already is. It already has been. It will continue for the forseeable future.

Indamixx Linux Netbook Aims to Be Your Open Source Recording Studio

Filed under
Hardware

ostatic.com/blog: As noted on the Musician's Friend site, Linux fans with musical abilities may want to take note of the new $499 Indamixx Netbook MKII. It runs a Linux multimedia operating system called Transmission 3.0 that has a set of applications for editing, mixing, and recording music.

Intel, Nokia team on Linux-based phone OS

Filed under
Linux

electronista.com: Intel and Nokia have been discovered as teaming on a new, Linux-based operating system for mobile phones. Labeled as the oFono project, the effort is separate from both companies' usual Linux projects.

Look out IE, Firefox, Chrome is getting much better

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: I love Google Chrome. It's faster than fast and I really like the clean, but still helpful, interface.

Fedora considering mailing list moderation

Filed under
Linux

lwn.net: It seems that some folks in the Fedora community are getting tired of the tone of the discussion on the project's mailing lists. Thus this proposal from the Fedora board:

Ubuntu 9.04 is as slick as Windows 7 and Mac OS X

Filed under
Ubuntu

webdotdev.com: Just like Microsoft has taken the blowtorch to Vista to produce the lightning- quick Windows 7 ... Ubuntu has picked up its own game

Linux Poem Contest–Write and Win $5

Filed under
Linux

2indya.com: If you are a Linux enthusiast and love to use open-source, this should excite you. I am a published poet and want to blend this two issues together. I intend to give $5 for the best poem written for Linux.

Security - It's Not Just For Geeks

raiden.net: Ars Technica has an excellent series of articles about user security and why it's important for you to take security seriously, and why it's not just one of those "silly little things" that you leave for the geeks to worry about.

Is an IBM purchase of Red Hat inevitable?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: Despite a bevy of questions—looming competition from Oracle, takeover rumors and a weak economy—Red Hat appears to be humming along.

New Firefox Icon: Iteration 1

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.mozilla.com/faaborg: This is a draft icon rendering for Firefox 3.5, subsequent iterations will be posted every 24 hours or so.

Ubuntu 9.10 Off To A Great Performance Start

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: The first alpha release for Ubuntu 9.10 was made available yesterday and while it does net yet integrate Plymouth or any other new features, it has picked up a few new packages. Most prominently, Ubuntu 9.10 Alpha 1 features the Linux 2.6.30 kernel and GCC 4.4.

aTunes: Amazing Cross-Platform Audio Player and Manager

Filed under
Linux

aTunes is a full-featured audio player and manager, developed in Java programming language, so it can be executed on different platforms: Windows, Linux and Unix-like systems.

BackTrack 4 - Hacking galore

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: We have already had three articles on Linux forensics. This is the fourth. Today, we will review another high-end, security-oriented distribution, BackTrack.

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More in Tux Machines

Latvian Ventspils controls costs with open source

The administration of Ventspils, Latvia’s sixth largest city, is an avid user of free and open source software. The main benefits: cost and resource optimisation. Read more

Ubuntu Touch finds a home on a conflict-free, fair-trade, user-maintainable handset

Handset maker Fairphone is teaming up with the community project UBports, which seeks to get Ubuntu Touch on mobile devices. They will be showing off Ubuntu Touch running on the Fairphone 2 during Mobile World Congress, which starts February 27 in Barcelona. While Ubuntu is probably not the first name that comes to mind when you think of mobile devices, the phone in question offers some compelling features. “UBports Foundation will be showcasing its work at the Canonical booth, the company behind Ubuntu. Canonical is planning to tell about the latest developments around the convergence of its devices and UBports Foundation will share its mission ‘Ubuntu On Every Device’ with the visitors,” UBports said in a February 8 press release. Currently, UBports’ website lists three devices as “fully working as daily drivers:” The OnePlus One, Nexus 5, and the Fairphone 2, with the latter showing all parts as functioning with Ubuntu Touch, save the GPS radio. (Interestingly, the UBports project website for the Fairphone 2 still lists the GSM radio [in addition to the GPS] as a work in progress. However there is a video of two people talking with the handset, so it’s likely the Fairphone 2 project website is out of date.) The website also has instructions for flashing Ubuntu to the Fairphone 2. Read more

BSD Leftovers

  • LLVM/Clang 4.0 Is Running Late Due To Seven Blocker Bugs
    LLVM 4.0 was supposed to have been released by now, but it's running late due to open blocker bugs. Hans Wennborg commented on the mailing list that while the release should have happened on 21 February, serving as release manager, he hasn't tagged the release yet due to open blocker bugs.
  • FreeBSD-Based pfSense 2.3.3 Open-Source Firewall Released with over 100 Changes
    Rubicon Communications' Jim Pingle announced the availability of a new point release to the pfSense 2.3 stable series, which adds over 100 improvements and a bunch of new features. Updated to FreeBSD 10.3-RELEASE-p16, the pfSense 2.3.3 maintenance release is here more than seven months after the 2.3.2 update and introduces several new packages, including TFTP Server, LCDproc, cellular, and tinc, a lot of improvements for the OpenVPN and IPsec implementations, as well as numerous stability and security fixes from FreeBSD. Dozens of bug fixes are included in pfSense 2.3.3 for WebGUI, graphs and monitoring, gateways and routing, notifications, Dynamic DNS, captive portal, NTP and GPS, DNS, resolver and forwarder, DHCP and DHCPv6 servers, router advertisements, HA and CARP, traffic shaping, firewall, rules, NAT, aliases, states, users, authentication, and privileges.
  • “Hi, I’m jkh and I’m a d**k”
    Yesterday, I was privy to a private email message discussing a topic I care deeply about. I contacted the author and said “You really need to make this public and give this a wider audience.” His response boiled down to “if I wanted it to get a wider audience, I was welcome to do so myself.” So here’s my first ever guest post, from Jordan K Hubbard, one of the founders of the FreeBSD Project. While this discussion focuses on FreeBSD, it’s applicable to any large open source project.

Linux Graphics