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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Test drive Linux with nothing but a flash drive Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 5:37pm
Story Manjaro 0.8.10 Receives Its Twelfth and Final Update Pack Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 5:27pm
Story Season of KDE 2014 Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 5:24pm
Story NVIDIA vs. Nouveau Drivers On Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 5:22pm
Story Huge Computer Retail Chain in the UK Denies Warranty If Users Install Linux Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 5:17pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 5:13pm
Story SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Debuts With 'Rock-Solid' Cloud Support Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 5:08pm
Story Mozilla hopes to challenge Raspbian as RPi OS of choice Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 1:37pm
Story Bob Young talks about the origins of Red Hat Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 1:17pm
Story What we talk about when we talk about Linux and systemd Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 10:54am

Is Chrome OS Too Orwellian Or Big Brother-ish?

Filed under
Google

thecoffeedesk.com: We’ve talked and complained about Google on many other occasions within this blog, but with many discussions of Google also comes discussions of privacy. But now the giant will also be the only thing sitting between users and hardware with Chrome OS.

Steven's handy desktop Linux guide

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: With so many desktop Linux distributions, unless you're an expert it's hard to know what's what. Since I think I qualify as a desktop Linux expert, so here's my quick and dirty guide on picking out the right desktop Linux.

Why finding the Linux kernel 'security flaws" now, is a good thing

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: There have been a few articles posted about the horrible, life ending, security flaw found in the Linux kernel, that has been patched now.

Signs show Linux moving into the driver's seat

Filed under
Linux

news.zdnet.com: A steady stream of manufacturers are requesting Linux drivers for their hardware, suggesting growing adoption of Linux operating systems among enterprises.

5 Things non-geeks should not do on Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

penguininside.blogspot: Some common mistakes done by many people while trying out Linux desktop for first time …

Using Xfce for a Netbook Desktop

Filed under
Software

community.zdnet: I have been experimenting with making my own custom netbook desktop using the Xfce Desktop Environment. Xfce is supposed to be small and fast, which fits the bill nicely for a netbook; if I can work out a layout that looks good.

25 Awesome Slackware Wallpapers

Filed under
Slack

junauza.com: Slackware, the longest standing Linux distribution has plenty of loyal followers even up to this day. So I'm not surprised to see a lot of user-created artworks like desktop wallpapers that are dedicated to this tenacious distro.

Big-Name Distro Disenchantment

Filed under
Linux

pcplus.co.uk: the new summer collection from the top three desktop distro vendors is here. But if you’re thinking of giving a slice of your hard disk to one of these prominent free operating systems, don’t bother.

Novell partners and users to help develop products

Filed under
SUSE

itwire.com: Novell has announced that all partners and users will have access to the product development portal. If you're agitating for an enhancement, here's your chance to push it through.

Get to know Linux: Terminology

Filed under
Linux

ghacks.net: I have been covering the Linux operating system for a long time now. There are moments when I take it for granted that everyone knows the basic terminology surrounding this operating system. Because this is obviously not the case, I thought it might be a good time to stop and explain some of the terms that many Linux users toss about every day.

GIMP 2.6.7 Released

Filed under
GIMP

GIMP 2.6.7 comes with lots of bug-fixes and it contains an important fix for using GIMP with the latest GEGL and babl releases.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Microsoft's 'Custom XML' patent suit could put ODF at risk

  • Game on Linux - GridWars 2
  • FSF launch GNU Generation
  • Linux Drop Down Terminals
  • Why Should You Love PCLinuxOS 2009.2?
  • Are there too many Linux distros? Case in point: Hannah Montana Linux
  • Aquaria Game Coming To Linux. Icculus Porting?
  • Magnatune.com and Amarok
  • 20 GDM Themes For Ubuntu You Probably Haven't Seen Before
  • Did Microsoft Just Throw WinMo Under A Bus?
  • Quake Live Updated to Support Linux and Mac Users
  • Les Paul, guitarist whose innovations paved the way for rock 'n' roll, dies at 94
  • Opera 10.0 Beta 3
  • IBM gaining Linux customers at Sun's expense
  • Pardus 2009 firewall, NTP, and openSSH server configuration
  • Adding a little Chromium to my browser diet
  • Fixing a Dell laptop, part 3
  • Installing OpenOffice in PCLinuxOS
  • Flashing the BIOS from Linux (OpenSUSE 11.0)
  • Rubber Stamp Effect Using GIMP

I Was at the First LinuxCon

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org/weblogs/jzemlin: People often say things like this as a badge of honor. Some of us even keep event badges hung from our office doors as a tally of the events we’ve attended.

Firefox 3 about to get a major update

Filed under
Moz/FF

developer.mozilla.org: Starting a little later tonight, users with the latest version of Firefox 3 will be getting an offer to update to Firefox 3.5. If you’re running Firefox 3.0.13 you will see the offer in the next couple of days.

Bug exposes eight years of Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux
Security

theregister.co.uk: Linux developers have issued a critical update for the open-source OS after researchers uncovered a vulnerability in its kernel that puts most versions built in the past eight years at risk of complete takeover.

Linux Mint 7 (XFCE)

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com; Some people have slower computers and some folks simply have no need for all the desktop bells and whistles found in KDE or Gnome. If you’re one of those folks then you might want to consider checking out the XFCE version of Linux Mint 7.

Novell lands full-time staff on openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

theregister.co.uk: The openSUSE project, which creates the development version of Novell's SUSE Linux, is getting a handful of full-time Novell developers.

The Perfect Desktop - gOS 3.1 Gadgets

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a gOS 3.1 Gadgets desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

Linux Migration Guide: Everything You Never Wanted to Know About Linux Maintenance

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: There's no avoiding it, if you're using a computer (or just about anything else) the operating system needs to be maintained. This article addresses Linux maintenance issues and techniques.

The Cost of SELinux, Audit, & Kernel Debugging

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: When benchmarking development releases of Fedora in particular, they often end up being much slower than the final build and perform lower when compared against some of the other leading desktop distributions. As we have mentioned in previous articles, this is generally due to the debugging support enabled within the development builds of Fedora.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME

  • A Simple, Straightforward Clipboard Manager for GNOME
    Clipboard Manager extension for Gnome Shell is a no-frills clipboard manager for GNOME. It adds an indicator menu to the top panel and caches your clipboard history. There’s nothing extra; no regex searching, or cross-device, multi-sync or pan-dimensional magic. Just a simple, easy to access clipboard history. I’ve never been a particularly big clipboard fan. I typically only need to access whatever I copy as I copy it.
  • First GNOME 3.26 Development Release Out, Some Apps Ported to Meson Build System
    GNOME Project's Michael Catanzaro just informed us via an email announcement that the first unstable release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is out now for public testing and early adopters. Yes, we're talking about GNOME 3.25.1, the first development in the release cycle of GNOME 3.26, which is currently scheduled to launch later this year, on September 13. Being the first unstable release and all that, GNOME 3.25.1 doesn't ship with many changes, and you can check out the CORE NEWS and APPS NEWS for details.
  • Features To Look Forward To In Next Month's KDE Plasma 5.10
    We are just one month away from seeing the next KDE Plasma 5 desktop release.
  • User Question: With Some Free Software Phone Projects Ending, What Does Plasma Mobile's Future Look Like?
    Rosy. While it is true that Plasma Mobile used to be built on the Ubuntu Phone codebase, that was superseded some time ago. The recent events at Ubuntu and other mobile communities have not modified the pace of the development (which is pretty fast) or the end goal, which is to build frameworks that will allow convergence for all kinds of front-ends and apps on all kinds of devices.

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]