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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Phoronix on Graphics Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 12:38am
Story Leftovers: Chromebooks Roy Schestowitz 20/08/2015 - 11:41pm
Story Government Adoption of Open Source Software Continues In The U.S. Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2015 - 11:30pm
Story Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Might be Delayed Due to Bugs in PulseAudio Implementation Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2015 - 11:27pm
Story Open source, Echo-like gizmo is halfway to Kickstarter gold Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2015 - 11:17pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/08/2015 - 9:55pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 20/08/2015 - 9:49pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/08/2015 - 9:47pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 20/08/2015 - 9:46pm
Story Embedded/Devices Roy Schestowitz 20/08/2015 - 9:33pm

Newbie Linux management shortcut joy

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Asking a Windows administrator to give Linux a chance as a server operating system is doubly difficult. To a Windows admin, the Linux world is a hostile place, a collection of dozens of different operating systems sharing the same basic kernel.

A Bushel of Useful Resources for Inkscape

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: If you're looking for a graphics and illustration tool that can compete with Adobe Illustrator and is especially good for logos and splashy still graphics, give Inkscape a try.

Firefox 4 may not get silent updates

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox 4 may not get silent updates after all
  • Mozilla renames Firefox 4 Beta 6 to Beta 7

Gnome-do: Open Source Software App Launcher

Filed under
Software

serverwatch.com: This week, I've been experimenting with gnome-do, the Gnome application launcher that also allows you to specify particular actions to take on whatever file or application you've found.

A Call For Open Source

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: Bloglines was my first RSS aggregator, and it will be gone on October 1st. I’d like to call on IAC and Ask.com to release bloglines to new life as an open source project.

Old School Monday: Linux Manifesto

Filed under
Linux

maximumpc.com: He's been listed as one of The 100 Most Influential Inventors of All Time, and was a 2008 inductee to the Computer History Museum.

Does the Linux desktop matter?

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: When it all boils down, does Linux on the desktop really matter? Last week, I touched on the problems counting the number of Linux desktops, but the real question is does it really matter?

Peppermint Ice resuscitates an elderly Thinkpad

Filed under
Linux

linuxtrends.com: Bucking the trend toward ever beefier and bulkier Linux distributions, the Peppermint OS project recently unveiled the first release of a lighter-weight variant of its small-footprint Linux OS.

Reflections on Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Reflections on Ubuntu, Canonical and free software
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #210
  • A Quick Look at Kubuntu 10.10

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Foobnix: A Very Interesting New Music Player
  • More Zatikon Add-On Packs Coming Soon…
  • Red Hat teases: Who is its Australian cloud customer?
  • Phase 1 Garage: The next generation of entrepreneurship
  • The Most Vulnerable and Exploitable Operating System Ever
  • Pandora Open-Source Gaming Handheld is Alive and in Demand
  • More firms opting for open source software: Is it right for you?
  • Citizen Linus
  • Apache Software Foundation announces new Executive Officers
  • Open-Source Lecture Capture
  • Year-old vulnerability endangers OpenX ad server
  • 15 minutes of fame KDE screencast
  • Ubuntu makeover paying off
  • The short stack
  • Linux 2.6.36-rc4 Brings Two Weeks Of Fixes
  • Amnesia: The Dark Descent video game review
  • Ubuntu 10.10 – Misanthropic Mongoose Tryout
  • Kobo Desktop eReader application also available for Ubuntu
  • Firefox 4 Freeze Delayed Again, Panorama Gets Big Upgrades
  • LinuxInstall.net Podcast Episode 31 -Linux and a virtualized world...

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Browsing Comfortably on KDE
  • Debian Sid gets KDE 4.5.1
  • How do we compile & execute C programs under Linux?
  • How to upgrade OpenSUSE 11.3 x64 to KDE 4.5 Stable
  • LDAP: The tool to manage enterprise infrastructure
  • How to get back missing gnome-panel icons/applets
  • Tune In. Turn On. Turn Key.
  • Build Service Cheat Sheet
  • source port routing

New app lets you watch all the big TV networks live on your PC

Filed under
Software

dvice.com: When you think of watching TV online, sites like Hulu or YouTube come to mind. You don't typically think of flipping through ABC, NBC and other channels like you would with an actual TV, but that's exactly what you can do with a new service called ivi, launching today.

Will Cisco Be the Next to Fall to Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

enterprisenetworkingplanet.com: Cisco has long dominated the networking world. It seems its supremacy is unassailable. Yet open source-based networking just might be its undoing - eventually.

Open source IQ test

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: Open source has emerged as one of the most important trends in the software industry, but myths and misconceptions about free and open source software still abound. How well do you understand the world of open source software? Take our 20-question quiz to find out.

Najarian Says Red Hat May Be Acquired

Filed under
Linux

tmcnet.com: Fast Money's Jon Najarian said there is speculation that Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) may be acquired, and as a result, its options and common stock are active today.

directions - openSUSE and Fedora

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

nowwhatthe.blogspot: Interestingly enough, in parallel to our discussion about where we're going, Fedora is also discussing strategy.

Be A Part of Linux Journal's 200th Issue!!!

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: The 200th issue of Linux Journal is just around the corner, and I thought it would be fun if all of you could participate!

The government doesn't look good naked.

Filed under
OSS

opensource.com: Open Government Directive, we seem to have a backlash. The government has spent millions of dollars collecting, organizing, and cataloging its data to make it more available to the public. An unprecedented effort. I think we can all agree that more transparency is always — always — a good thing. Not so, says Ellen Miller.

The Linux Sweet Spot

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: To be successful on the next wave of Internet devices, the Linux price point has to go lower. Imagine the seventy-five dollar touch screen Linux tablet that does one thing, browse the web.

Does Linux Offer Too Much Choice?

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Linux doesn't offer too much choice, "but it may not organize its choices well enough," says Slashdot blogger David Masover. The ideal situation "is to provide sane defaults so that people aren't forced to make choices --

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Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
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GNU: GLIBC and GCC News

  • Recent GNU* C library improvements
    As technology advancements continue, the core technology must be updated with new ideas that break paradigms and enable innovation. Linux* systems are based on two main core technologies: the Linux Kernel project and the GNU C Library (GLIBC) project. The GLIBC project provides the core libraries for the GNU system and GNU/Linux systems, as well as many other systems that use Linux as the kernel. These libraries provide interfaces that allow programs to manipulate and manage files, memory, threads and other operating system objects. The release of GLIBC version 2.27 marks a new step on the Linux technology roadmap, with major new features that will allow Linux developers to create and enhance applications. This blog post describes several key new features and how to use them.
  • What Makes GLIBC 2.27 Exciting To The Clear Linux Folks
    Released at the beginning of February was Glibc 2.27 and it's comprised of a lot of new features and performance improvements. But what's the best of Glibc 2.27? One of the Clear Linux developers at Intel, Victor Rodriguez Bahena, put out a blog post this week outlining some of the most exciting features for this GNU C Library update. While most Linux distributions tend to be conservative in rolling out new GLIBC updates, Clear Linux is already on v2.27 and even had back-ported some of the performance patches prior to the official 2.27 debut.
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Open Source Color Management is broken

Since I am now in the business of photography and image processing (see my travel photography blog here), I thought it was time to finally get proper monitors and calibrate them. I wanted to do this with Open Source tools and use the calibration data for my Linux desktop, so I ordered a ColorHug2 colorimeter, which is Open Hardware compliant and all the tools are FOSS licensed. And from then on everything just went downhill. Read more