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Friday, 06 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Truth is Treason in the Empire of Lies: The Truth about Linspire

Filed under
Linux

kevincarmony.blogspot: After failing to get any response from Linspire as to why they are not holding annual shareholder meetings, I asked them publicly to do so in my last blog. Not only has Linspire not held a shareholders meeting, but to this day, they have not even responded to my inquiries with so much as a "we'll get back to you on that."

Virtualization Makes Running Linux a Snap

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: Many people love Linux but aren't able to commit to using it full time. Some folks use certain peripherals that Linux can't yet accommodate, while others need applications for which suitable open source options don't yet exist. Fortunately, virtualization makes it possible to put your favorite Linux distribution right on your Mac or Windows PC.

Commentary: the Linux Foundation and the future of Linux

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: I came away from the second annual Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit with mixed feelings. I mean, it's hard not to support the group that pays Linus Torvalds to spend his time continuing to lead the poster-boy project for free and open source software. But at the same time, those golden chains are my biggest concern about the Linux Foundation.

Analysts Get Hit By Cluestick?

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com: It might not be entirely evident from the headlines, but if you read the articles, it will become immediately clear: these positive statements about Linux and negative statements about Windows are courtesy of analysts.

Review: Hat Trick For Fedora 9 Beta

Filed under
Linux

crn.com: Fedora announced Fedora 9 Beta late last month, and Test Center reviewers replaced the current Fedora 8 install to see what the new version has to offer. There is a solid indication of the new things to come that makes the stable release, expected May 1, worth watching.

Mandriva Flash 2008 USB Key Review

Filed under
MDV

reviewlinux.com: USB Key Linux distributions seem to be the craze at the moment. The Mandriva Flash 2008 4 gig USB Key is bundled on a Dane-Elec USB Key. It's sturdy construction and proven reliability makes Dane-Elec a good chioce for Mandriva to place their OS on.

The Linux lesson Windows needs

Filed under
OS

Dana Blankenhorn: Gartner analysts are running about in Las Vegas, hair on fire, shouting that Windows is collapsing. Or about to collapse. This is easy to get snarky about, but for Linux’ sake I hope it never happens.

Also: Linux or open source?

Interview: How a hacker became a freedom fighter

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

newscientist.com: One of the founding fathers of "free software" and an esteemed elder of the hacking community, Richard Stallman has made defending people's freedoms his life's work. His advocacy of personal freedoms extends to the protection of true democracy and of the human rights increasingly being trampled on in the US and elsewhere.

Hardy Heron -- Clean or Dirty

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxjournal.com: As the release of Ubuntu 8.04 LTS rapidly approaches, the all important question is beginning to form in everyone's mind. Upgrade, or freshly install.

Also: second worst dialog i saw during a recent ubuntu upgrade

Scribus - Desktop Publishing for Penguins

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: When it comes to desktop publishing, a lot of people might think of big organizations producing newsletters, or your local boy scouts producing a fund raising flier. But the average person out there might not see where any kind of desktop publishing is really needed. Honestly, if you really look deeply, you might be surprised.

NVIDIA 173.08 Linux Display Driver Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Last week it was exclusively reported by Phoronix that a new NVIDIA binary Linux display driver should be out in the next week, and sure enough we were right, again. The NVIDIA 173.08 Linux driver was released last night and features support for several new NVIDIA GPUs, including the GeForce 9800 series, experimental support for X Server 1.5, and a number of fixes with Linux 2.6.25 kernel compatibility.

Private deal to approve OOXML? More evidence surfaces

Filed under
OSS

universal-interop-council.org: Circumstantial evidence is mounting of one or more private deals having been struck to approve DIS-29500 Office Open XML ("OOXML") as an international standard, a deal that may have played a role in several key national standardization bodies changing their voting position to approve OOXML.

Also: A week in the life of Open XML

Tput: Add some spice to your UNIX shell scripts

Filed under
News

Many times, shell scripts evolve into menu-based scripts, and the scripter wants to display more to users than simply scrolling text. Regardless of the complexity, scripters have always needed a way to change their output to bold, underline it, reverse the highlights, and so on. That's where tput comes into play.

Why “how” is the most important question open source vendors can answer

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: “The question is not why use open source, but how to best use open source,” wrote Matt Asay earlier this week. It was a throwaway point but one that I think deserves more attention.

Lucene: The Open-Source Search Engine

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: If you want to search for a piece of text on the Web, you probably turn to Google or a similar search engine. But how can you integrate search into your Web site? You can build your own search engine, or hope to find an open-source alternative.

The joy of using Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

ckunte.com: It’s a strange feeling, but I really enjoy booting up and using Ubuntu—as my primary OS at home, like I have felt for no other before. I am neither a linux kernel diver, nor a developer. I’m just this regular guy.

Rollout help requested

Filed under
Software

A friend is soliticing advice for a project he's working on. It involves a small library that needs one of its computers limited to only a browser accessing one website where the card catalogue is stored.

Compiz is Cool – and Why That Matters

Filed under
Software

computerworlduk.com: One of the most vexed questions within the open source world is when, if ever, GNU/Linux will take off on the desktop. Strangely, this isn't really about capabilities: as someone who has Ubuntu running on both of his main systems, I can attest to the fact that GNU/Linux is not just usable, it's a downright pleasure to use.

Advocating free software in the real world

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Recently, in this column, I spoke about how we can lose our free software choices if we don’t use them. Sticking with that choice is not always easy so how do we get others to make it, particularly in a world where the choice is often made for them. How can we advocate free software in a world where others don’t seem to care?

Flock 1.1 offers nectar for social butterflies

Filed under
Software

linux.com: When we looked at Flock 0.9 last year, the social Web browser showed a lot of potential. Now that it's over the 1.0 hump, the Flock team has made good on the application's promise. Maybe too good -- while Flock serves up a lot of content on a single page, you practically need super-powers to take it all in.

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Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • OpenSSL patches two high-severity flaws
    OpenSSL has released versions 1.0.2h and 1.0.1t of its open source cryptographic library, fixing multiple security vulnerabilities that can lead to traffic being decrypted, denial-of-service attacks, and arbitrary code execution. One of the high-severity vulnerabilities is actually a hybrid of two low-risk bugs and can cause OpenSSL to crash.
  • Linux Foundation Advances Security Efforts via Badging Program
    The Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative's badging program matures, as the first projects to achieve security badges are announced.
  • Linux Foundation tackles open source security with new badge program
  • WordPress Plugin ‘Ninja Forms’ Security Vulnerability
    FOSS Force has just learned from Wordfence, a security company that focuses on the open source WordPress content management platform, that a popular plugin used by over 500,000 sites, Ninja Forms, contains serious security vulnerabilities.
  • Preparing Your Network for the IoT Revolution
    While there is no denying that IP-based connectivity continues to become more and more pervasive, this is not a fundamentally new thing. What is new is the target audience is changing and connectivity is becoming much more personal. It’s no longer limited to high end technology consumers (watches and drones) but rather, it is showing up in nearly everything from children’s toys to kitchen appliances (yes again) and media devices. The purchasers of these new technology-enabled products are far from security experts, or even security aware. Their primary purchasing requirements are ease of use.
  • regarding embargoes
    Yesterday I jumped the gun committing some patches to LibreSSL. We receive advance copies of the advisory and patches so that when the new OpenSSL ships, we’re ready to ship as well. Between the time we receive advance notice and the public release, we’re supposed to keep this information confidential. This is the embargo. During the embargo time we get patches lined up and a source tree for each cvs branch in a precommit state. Then we wait with our fingers on the trigger. What happened yesterday was I woke up to a couple OpenBSD developers talking about the EBCDIC CVE. Oh, it’s public already? Check the OpenSSL git repo and sure enough, there are a bunch of commits for embargoed issues. Pull the trigger! Pull the trigger! Launch the missiles! Alas, we didn’t look closely enough at the exact issues fixed and had missed the fact that only low severity issues had been made public. The high severity issues were still secret. We were too hasty.
  • Medical Equipment Crashes During Heart Procedure Because of Antivirus Scan [Ed: Windows]
    A critical medical equipment crashed during a heart procedure due to a timely scan triggered by the antivirus software installed on the PC to which the said device was sending data for logging and monitoring.
  • Hotel sector faces cybercrime surge as data breaches start to bite
    Since 2014, things have become a lot more serious with a cross section of mostly US hotels suffering major breaches during Point-of-Sale (POS) terminals. Panda Security lists a string of attacks on big brands including on Trump Hotels, Hilton Worldwide, Hyatt, Starwood, Rosen Hotels & Resorts as well two separate attacks on hotel management outfit White Lodging and another on non-US hotel Mandarin Oriental.

Android Leftovers

today's howtos