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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 9:42pm
Story 11 ways LXLE Linux will make you forget all about XP Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 9:41pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 9:41pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 9:39pm
Story Linux Kernel Testing Philosophy Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 9:34pm
Story Automotive Grade Linux Released: An Interview With Dan Cauchy Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 9:29pm
Story 3 ways to contribute to Firefox OS Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 8:55pm
Story Linux Foundation SysAdmin Andy Grimberg Loves New Tech and Snowboarding Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 6:05pm
Story Preview: Benchmarking CentOS 7.0 & Scientific Linux 7.0 Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 5:53pm
Story LXLE 14.04 review – new paradigms Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 5:46pm

Netflix loves/hates Linux

Filed under
Linux

dwasifar.com: The online mail-order DVD rental company Netflix launched an additional service a while back, whereby you can watch unlimited movies online. When I logged on to the Netflix site today, it offered a film about Linux. But you can’t watch it if you use Linux.

Linux Desktop Hardware Myths Explored

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

itmanagement.earthweb.com: Perhaps one of the most common myths surrounding desktop Linux is the belief that modern distributions do not provide decent hardware support.

Toshiba notebooks with OpenSolaris

Filed under
OS

h-online.com: Toshiba is now offering Sun's OpenSolaris 2008.11 pre-installed on some of their notebooks, following a deal completed in December.

The best looking Linux is nearly here - and it's not Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Ubuntu Linux 9.04, otherwise known as Jaunty Jackalope, will be released later this month. Forget Windows 7, this is going to be the hottest operating software release of 2009. Yet, the muddy brown and orange theme doesn't do it for me which is why this time I'm eyeing off something else from Canonical's stable.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Testing Mandriva Spring

  • NVIDIA's Open-Source Driver Gets Updated
  • Feds release open-source NHIN gateway software
  • The Trouble With Webcams and Ubuntu Linux
  • Novell SUSE Linux, PlateSpin: So Happy Together?
  • Linux Mint 5 (Elyssa)
  • The true cost of migrating to open source
  • View Many Firefox Tabs at Once With Split Browser
  • Tomboy to be ported to C++ for real
  • Comux 001111
  • Mozilla Developers News 4/7
  • Why Don’t Linux-based Netbooks Have the Same H/W as Windows Ones?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Tutorial: An Introduction to Linux CLI

  • Howto: Create launchers using easy bash scripts
  • Install Codecs Flash JRE Without Internet In Ubuntu
  • Linux Determine which Services are Enabled at Boot
  • How to Install Hercules Classic Silver Webcam in Ubuntu
  • Preventing a service from starting on Debian or Ubuntu
  • OpenGL in Mandriva
  • Burning ISOs in CLI using OpenSUSE 11.1
  • File Synchronization with Rsync over SSH
  • Dropbox for Linux
  • lsof Seeks All Open Files

The Beginner's Guide to Linux Part 4: Introduction to the Terminal

Filed under
HowTos

maximumpc.com: Traditionally, most new users have always been reluctant to experiment with the command line interface. Once you understand the terminal, Linux will finally open up to you. The terminal is easily the most powerful part of a Linux system.

A new free antivirus for Unix/Linux platform

Filed under
Software

ubuntugeek.com: Today I’d like to introduce to you all a brand new antivirus for Unix/Linux platform from a famous company, BitDefender.

Linux desktop neglect

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: Why isn't Linux on more desktops? Here's the reason we don't talk about much: the Linux distributors don't encourage the Linux desktop.

Introducing KDE 4: Kontacts: Calendar (KOrganizer)

Filed under
KDE

introducingkde4.blogspot: Welcome to the third issue of the Kontact suit series. Today we'll give a look at the Calendar kpart (KOrganizer):

Wrist-mounted computer runs Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: Glacier Computer has announced a wearable computer that runs Linux and includes built-in WiFi along with GPS and Bluetooth options. The wrist-mounted "Ridgeline W200" has a 3.5-inch touchscreen display, backlit keys, a hot-swappable battery pack, and an electronic compass.

Mercurial vs Git

Filed under
Software

rg03.wordpress: There are many blog posts and articles all over the Internet providing comparissons between Git and Mercurial. Most of them only briefly describe the main differences and then try to decide which one is better. However, I didn’t find many articles explaining the differences in detail.

Telerik ports .NET controls to Linux

Filed under
Software

sdtimes.com: Telerik has partnered with Novell to certify that its RadControls ASP.NET AJAX component suite supports the open-source Mono runtime environment, permitting developers to build .NET applications in a Linux environment.

Also: Using MoMA to Port from Windows .NET to Mono on Linux

All the Best Linux Cheat Sheets

Filed under
Linux

nixtutor.com; All the best Linux cheat sheets rounded up in one post broken down into Linux command line, Linux security, Linux administration, Gnome/KDE, sed/awk/vim, and distribution specific cheat sheets..

8 Reasons You Should Switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

namd3r.com: Most Linux distributions, like Ubuntu and Fedora, come absolutely free of charge to install, distribute, reinstall, and modify without worrying about breaking any copyright or pirating laws.

Linux device developers not weird, just mainstream

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Developers putting Linux on consumer devices aren't weirdos mining a niche, according to the Intel man who last year volunteered to help maintain embedded Linux.

Supporting Linux in the Microsoft Enterprise

Filed under
Linux

daileymuse.com: Linux adoption in the enterprise data center continues to grow in terms of both numbers of servers and the variety of roles Linux occupies. As these deployments become more pervasive in the enterprise so too does the need for the integration and interoperability.

Does Uptime still matter?

ducea.com: When I started working as a sysadmin (about 10 years ago) there was this obsession about uptime. Everyone considered this the greatest sign that you are doing a good job as a sysadmin if you were able ‘to keep the machine running’ for a long time.

How much legal trouble is Cisco in against the FSF?

Filed under
Legal

blogs.zdnet.com: A new Law.Com analysis indicates Cisco may be in big legal trouble over the FSF lawsuit alleging it misused open source code in its hardware. Until you learn the rest of the story.

Is Linux ready to go to FAT camp?

Filed under
Linux

linux-watch.com: The talking drums keep rumbling throughout the Linux jungle as the tuxified ones ponder the impact of Dutch personal navigation device (PND) vendor TomTom agreeing to terms after being sued by Microsoft.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India