Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Flock 2.5 launches with support for Twitter, more services

Filed under
Software

cnet.com: Statistically, Flock is probably not for you. This Web browser, the 2.5 version of which is coming out today, is "designed to be the essential browser for the most active 25 percent of users."

Integrate Google Gadgets with Plasma in Kubuntu 9.04 Jaunty

Filed under
KDE

With the release of KDE 4.2, Google Gadgets became fully integrated into Plasma. You can add them to your desktop with a few clicks of your mouse.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Recovering Lost Data Using The Coroner's Toolkit

  • New Firefox Icon: Concept Rendering
  • Glug hosts free talk on OSS migration strategies
  • U Georgia Goes Open Source for Student Portal
  • OOo 3.1: Three nice new features for Writer
  • Matching files and packages in Debian/Ubuntu
  • The New Linux.com: A Review
  • Lenovo’s Revisionist Netbook History
  • Vim made easy: how to get your favorite IDE features
  • Disk Encryption With TrueCrypt
  • Stallman rounds on JavaScript
  • Relive old NES days with Secret Maryo Chronicles
  • Why Linux is not (yet) Ready for the Desktop
  • Foresight Linux 2.2.1
  • Debian / Ubuntu Linux Install Advanced Intrusion Detection
  • Gentoo to Ubuntu Migration Part 2: The College Years
  • 9 of the Best Free Linux Educational Games
  • generalized makefiles
  • Tutorial: Boot Linux Over A Network
  • Portable Zenwalk
  • 10 solid Linux distributions for your netbook
  • Ubuntu One Thoughts

Why People resort to Arch Linux

Filed under
Linux

lazytechguy.com: Arch Linux is a Linux enthusiasts dream. It has a rare reputation of being very basic at the same time very user friendly.

Video overlay controller offers Linux-ready SDK

linuxdevices.com: Advanced Micro Peripherals announced a PC/104-Plus-format multi-channel video controller board with a Linux-compatible software development kit.

Linux, shminux

Filed under
Linux

garnercitizen.com: I keep waiting for the day Linux becomes easy to use for the average person and not just college computer science graduates who have probably been weaned on it.

Managing Ubuntu Linux on the cloud

blogs.computerworld: It's actually pretty darn easy to run a virtual operating system on a server or on the cloud. The real trick is managing them. That's why I'm excited that Canonical, Ubuntu's Linux commercial backer, recently released Canonical Landscape 1.3.

OpenOffice.org: Adoption is Gaining Momentum

Filed under
OOo

ooomarketing.blogspot: The workstations within academic computing labs and classrooms are increasingly occupied by open source software and open platforms.

Proxmox VE 1.2: First Impressions

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: Proxmox VE (VE) offers both OpenVZ containers and full virtualization via KVM in the same system. This flexibility provides you with the native speed of OpenVZ virtual machines and the traditional convenience of fully virtualized operating systems.

Linux Netbooks: Hit Microsoft where it ain't

Filed under
Linux

news.cnet.com: In open source or in product development generally, one of the biggest mistakes is to take on a deeply entrenched incumbent on its own turf. Almost inevitably, if you play someone else's game, even if you're a little cheaper/faster/better, you're going to lose.

Working to Rule

Filed under
OSS

tuxdeluxe.org: Office 2007 SP2 contains Microsoft's first native implementation of the file format Open Document Format (ODF). The devil, as always, is in the details.

wicd - A friendly network manager for Linux

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: Linux distros have a broad range of managers. In KDE, the default utility is called KNetworkManager. In Gnome, it is - aptly called - Gnome Network Manager. Some Linux users do not like either of these two. Enter wicd.

Linux and the channel

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: Linux Pundit Bill Weinberg has produced two posts this weekend asking why we don’t have Linux laptops.

Fedora 12 Team Taking Codename Suggestions

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: Contributing members of the Fedora community are putting their heads together again to come up with a codename for Fedora 12, and if you've got a good suggestion you've only got until May 23rd to shout it out.

Will European rules impact open source business models?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: If open source wants to get around European procurement rules and tap the government market there can’t be differences between commercial and community versions of their products.

Ubuntu One Service Stirs Up Open-Source Controversy

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcworld.com: Unfortunately there's a stinky little issue, and it's related to a blog posting I made last week: Trademarks. Although it seems the Ubuntu One client is open source, the Web server side of things are still secret.

We should coin a name for non-geeks

terminally-incoherent: I’ve been thinking that we should come up with a name that would collectively describe non-geeks.

Create your own "Ubuntu" LiveCD with Reconstructor

blogs.techrepublic.com: But for creating a unique Ubuntu LiveCD that will allow you to customize what goes on the CD as well as the default username, theme, splash screens, wallpaper, etc. You need Reconstructor.

Microsoft, Linux Foundation issue joint letter opposing proposed software-licensing principles

blogs.zdnet.com: Truth can, indeed, be stranger than fiction — as is evidenced by a May 14 letter on software-licensing policies that was signed by both Microsoft and Linux Foundation officials.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Radeon vs. NVIDIA Performance For HITMAN On Linux With 17 GPUs

Last week Feral Interactive released the much anticipated Linux port of HITMAN, which debuted for Windows last year. Now that there's benchmark support for HITMAN on Linux, I have been running a number of tests for this game that's powered by the Glacier Engine and making use of OpenGL for rendering on Linux. In this article are our initial AMD Radeon performance figures making use of the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver compared to NVIDIA's driver and the assortment of GeForce results published yesterday. Read more

How China Mobile Is Using Linux and Open Source

China Mobile is one of the biggest telecom companies in the world, with more than 800 million users in China -- all of whom are served with open source technologies. During the 2016 Mobile World Congress, China Mobile declared that the operational support system running their massive network would be based on open source software. China Mobile is not alone; many major networking vendors are moving to open source technologies. For example, AT&T is building their future network on top of OpenStack, and they have invested in software-defined technology so significantly that they now call themselves a software company. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • [elementaryOS] AppCenter: Funded
    A few moments ago, we hit 100% funded for our AppCenter campaign on Indiegogo. Thank you, backers! More than 300 people backed us over just two weeks to help bring our pay-what-you-want indie app store to life.
  • Linux Lite To Have These New Features In The Next Release Linux Lite 3.4
    ...we contacted the creator of the Linux Lite “Jerry Bezencon” and enquired the upcoming new features in the latest version of the Linux Lite. We have also done a review of the latest available distro i.e. 3.2 (32 bit) so that the readers can understand easily where are the new features headed towards.
  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: CMS Energy Corporation (CMS), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • What Does The Chart For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell Us Presently?
  • LEDE-17.01 is coming [Ed: it has actually just come out, just like LWN's paywall]
    For some years, OpenWrt has arguably been the most active router-oriented distribution. Things changed in May of last year, though, when a group of OpenWrt developers split off to form the competing LEDE project. While the LEDE developers have been busy, the project has yet to make its first release. That situation is about to change, though, as evidenced by the LEDE v17.01.0-rc1 release candidate, which came out on February 1. Many of the changes made in LEDE since the 2015 OpenWrt "Chaos Calmer" release will not be immediately visible to most users. The core software has been updated, of course, including a move to the 4.4.42 kernel. There are a number of security-oriented enhancements, including a switch to SHA256 for package verification, the disabling of support for several old and insecure protocols, compilation with stack-overwrite detection, and more. There is support for a number of new devices. Perhaps the most anticipated new feature, though, is the improved smart queue management and the WiFi fairness work that has been done as part of the bufferbloat project. It has been clear for some time that WiFi should work far better than it does; the work that has found its way into the LEDE release candidate should be a significant step in that direction. Your editor decided that it was time to give LEDE a try, but there was some shopping to be done first. Getting the full benefit from the bufferbloat and airtime fairness work requires the right chipset; most of this work has been done on the Atheros ath9k driver. So the first step was to go out and pick up a new router with ath9k wireless. That is where the things turned out to be harder than one might expect.
  • Microsoft Faces European Privacy Probes Over Windows 10
    Microsoft Corp. faces a coordinated investigation by European privacy regulators after it failed to do enough to address their concerns about the collection and processing of user data with a series of changes to Windows 10 last month. European Union data-protection officials sent a letter to Microsoft saying they remain “concerned about the level of protection of users’ personal data,” according to a copy of the document posted by the Dutch watchdog Tuesday. Regulators from seven countries are concerned that even after the announced changes, “Microsoft does not comply with fundamental privacy rules.”