Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Microsoft has shot .NET ecosystem in foot

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
  • Microsoft has shot .NET ecosystem in foot: De Icaza
  • Patent 101
  • Microsoft moments -- good, bad and ugly
  • Questioning open-core licensing for open source software

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • All Your Browsing History Are Belong to Us
  • FSF announces Free Software Awards winners
  • Open Source Fundraising Campaigns: The GNOME Ruler
  • varnish changed my life
  • Installing and Running Linux on Nintendo Wii
  • My XFCE Desktop
  • Wally - Wallpaper changer using multiple sources
  • Compiz 0.9 Release Finally Approaching
  • My Mom Runs Ubuntu
  • Compaq Presario 2175us Ubuntu Graphics Driver
  • Now Hear This
  • Opera 10.51 Review
  • Trisquel- Ubuntu habla espanol
  • Linux Basement Episode 52 - Podcatching an Asterisk
  • List of Debian-based Distributions
  • Of Google, China and a disease called hypocrisy
  • Open Source Exchange Alternatives
  • Hack your Samsung TV, linux guy
  • AVG kills Windows viruses with Linux and emergency rescue CD
  • Oracle-Sun: An Insider’s View for Sun Partners
  • Open Source Software conference planned for April
  • Sneak Preview: Ubuntu Lucid Lynx 10.04 LTS

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Connecting To Serial Null Modems With GNU Screen
  • Use vmstat to monitor your system memory and CPU
  • Install Multiple 'Bleeding Edge' Firefox Versions in Linux
  • Fastest way to create ramdisk in Ubuntu/Linux
  • install 32bit deb applications in 64bit Ubuntu
  • Unix How To: Aliases and Functions
  • Add a Cache Clearing Button to Firefox
  • Get to know Linux: AppArmor
  • Console color schemes
  • Back In Time : System Restore on Ubuntu

If sudoku has you puzzled, turn to HoDoKu

Filed under
Gaming

sourceforge.net/blog: A search for “sudoku” on SourceForge.net yields more than 300 projects, so why use HoDoKu to generate, solve, and analyze sudoku puzzles? Creator Bernhard Hobiger gives three good reasons:

Red Hat posts profit gain, sales rise 18%

Filed under
Linux

marketwatch.com: Red Hat Inc. said Wednesday its fiscal fourth-quarter net income rose to $23.4 million, or 12 cents a share, from $16.2 million, or 8 cents a share in the same period last year.

The Awesome Wallpapers of pr09studio

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: If you read OMG! regularly you’ll likely be aware that there a few community artists/designers/themers that we really dig. Well the pantheon of win is about to be joined by another digital artist who’s wallpaper collection of consistently impressive standards has really wowed me.

Jabbing with Coccinella

Filed under
Software

linuxbeacon.com: Although its name sounds like that of a bacterium, Coccinella is a nice cross-platform open source Jabber client.

Interesting GNOME Census problems

Filed under
Software

blogs.gnome.org/bolsh: We’ve been running into some interesting issues with the GNOME census, which are causing us to twist our tiny brains to get useful results. I thought it might be interesting to share some of them.

Linux is a Better Teacher

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: I learned a little from my dalliances with Apple products. I learned a lot from PCs running DOS and Windows. I've learned the most about computers from Linux.

To Mark Shuttleworth on Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • To Mark Shuttleworth on Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 10.04 Installation Slideshow Gets Updated
  • Its beauty is in its potential
  • Why Docky’s GMail Docklet Doesn’t currently work in Ubuntu 10.04

Fedora 13 Beta testing is underway

Filed under
Linux
  • Fedora 13 Beta testing is underway
  • Future FPL

Microsoft Facing £25m Argentinian Linux Lawsuit

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Legal

eweekeurope.co.uk: A legal dispute between Microsoft and an open source company in Argentina raises questions about the availability of desktop Linux in other countries, experts claim

Linux games review

Filed under
Gaming

shanefagan.com: Ok since I made my last post about my search for some good native games I went looking BTW im excluding FPS games because they are all awesome (Nexuiz is my fav though).

Penguins converge on Austin Texas

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

linuxlock.blogspot: Austin is beautiful in the spring...enjoy it while you can because spring heralds summer. That's why the people organizing the Texas Linux Fest chose April to hold their event.

ZaReason Teo, with an Ubuntu twist

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

linux-netbook.com: Linux system builder ZaReason appears to have launched a new Linux netbook. While there’s no information about the new Teo netbook on the ZaReason web site, you can already order one from Amazon for $460.

Sharing Files & Folders Between Linux, Mac and Windows

Filed under
Software

linux.com: In today's world of business computing, systems must be able to communicate and interact with one another. In this article I am going to discuss ways in which you can have your Linux machine interacting with your co-workers' Mac and PC machines.

Mint 9: An overview of the new features

Filed under
Linux

linuxmint.com/blog: In this blog post, I’ll only go through the features that are developed specifically for Linux Mint.

Reviewed: VueScan 8.6.10

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Can it be true: is this really a piece of scanning software that can recognise your scanner first time? On Linux? Read on.

Unigine's Heaven 2.0 Benchmark Introduces Linux Support

Filed under
Gaming

techgage.com: To help push the tessellation boundaries just a bit further, Unigine has updated its Heaven benchmark to version 2.0 and introduced more robust modes. Alongside the updated Windows client, Unigine has also unveiled a Linux version, so we decided to take it for a spin to see how it both performs, and looks.

Also: Unigine Heaven Shows What Linux Gaming Can Look Like

Five Things To Fix In Gnome Shell

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: A few days ago, I installed the release candidate for Gnome 2.30, which provides an overview of what Gnome 3 will look like when it appears next fall. Since I’ve begun using Gnome 2.30, I’ve become more disappointed by the hour with the way it works. Here’s a list of the top five flaws in Gnome 2.30 that will make me an LXDE user if they are not addressed before the Gnome 3 release.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more