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Saturday, 30 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Why Free Software has poor usability, and how to improve it

Filed under
OSS

mpt.net.nz: When I wrote the first version of this article six years ago, I called it “Why Free Software usability tends to suck”. Today’s best open source applications and operating systems are better than they were then. But

Microsofts New Approach

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Humor

today's leftovers

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News
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2008.08.01

  • Linux One Liners
  • Installing Gentoo Via Ubuntu & PAM Problems
  • Daniel Robbins: Working on Gentoo Unstable Stages
  • Stable kernels 2.6.25.14 and 2.6.26.1
  • The empty debate over open source security
  • GNOME Foundation's Stormy Peters: Trust and empower
  • Images: Dinosaur sightings: Old search engines
  • My Daughter Meets the XO
  • Mints of Ubuntu
  • How to Install the Colorblind Applet on GNOME
  • Will Linux Work? Your chance to try and kill a cute little Linux box
  • Linux Foundation End User Collaboration Summit
  • Comparing B&W conversion methods

The Victor Raisys Back Story

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OSS

groklaw.net: Do you, by any chance, remember the name Victor Raisys? He was a technology analyst at Soundview Technology Group, who predicted difficulties for Linux when the SCO litigation began in 2003. Guess where he worked before?

4 Open Source Color Pickers

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Software

linuxtreat.blogspot: Color picker or Color Chooser is an application or component, to pick colors from photos and other images. Here's a list of open source color pickers. In most of the Linux distribution it is pre-installed.

Trouble in Linux paradise using Ubuntu 8.04.1 and openSUSE 11.0

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Linux

bitburners.com: Oh boy, this week the ‘quality’ of the biggest Linux distributions almost depressed me. Here are a couple fine examples of issues that one will never experience in the commercial software world.

Linux Desktop Odyssey: when Linux has a bad day

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Linux

techworld.com.au: I was preparing to move to my Linux desktop yesterday when all hell broke loose. It seems the SLED 10 box and its partner in crime Lotus Notes were having a very bad day. Let me recapitulate.

12 Hot Products To See At LinuxWorld

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Linux

crn.com: Thousands of the Linux faithful will converge on San Francisco's Moscone Center next week (Aug. 4-7) for the LinuxWorld conference and expo and the accompanying Next Generation Data Center show. Everything from cool hand-held devices to data center-class servers -- and the open-source software to run them -- will be on display and put through their paces on the show floor.

Vista SP1 and XP SP3 vs. Mac OS X and Linux

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OS

softpedia.com: Despite constantly downplaying the relevance of Linux and Mac OS X, because of a variety of reasons, from high Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) to security risks and inferior shipment volumes, Microsoft is well aware of the real threat to Windows represented by the open source platform and Apple's operating system.

Acer Aspire One ZG5 (Linux)

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Linux
Hardware

pcworld.idg.com.au: This Linux version of the Aspire One is easy to use and has a solid-state drive, but the Windows XP version has better memory and storage capacity for only $100 more.

KDE 4.1 Pushes Cross-Platform Support, UI

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KDE
Interviews

eweek.com: The free software Linux desktop KDE 4.1 advances the KDE Project's goals of cross-platform support and helps make the user interface more attractive. The KDE Project looked to Apple as an example of the importance of an attractive UI.

odds & ends and shorts & stuff

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News
  • My guess for Lenny’s release date

  • Opera 9.52 August Snapshot
  • Join LinuxQuestions.org at the LinuxWorld Conference and Expo
  • Yo Frankie! Looking Good Yo
  • Installfest for Schools at LinuxWorld
  • Great day for gtk users

A Week Working With Linux

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Linux

community.zdnet.co.uk/blog: After a short vacation during which I made a traveling test with Linux, which was very successful, I decided to continue the test by using it as much as possible for my work this week.

When software protection is good for FOSS

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OSS

raiden.net: Recently there have been numerous discussions on software and media piracy, with a few people even saying that open source could be the solution to stopping software piracy. However, software piracy is one of open source's biggest enemies, and few people realize that.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Install Three Experimental Compiz Plugins

  • Files used by a program
  • Add a Google map to your PHP site
  • Howto: Updating Dell Firmware on Linux
  • Reset your SLE/openSUSE Linux default file system permissions

Kernel Log : Tux3 file system announce, X.org updates

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Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Kernel developer of many years, Daniel Phillips posted several emails concerning file system design, then announced he was planning to take these ideas and apply them to the design and development of Tux3, although there is no currently functioning Tux 3 source code.

What Ubuntu Thinks of a TinyTuxbox

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Hardware
Ubuntu

gibbalog.blogspot: Tiny, quiet, green, affordable, and fun computers. Put aside that huge noisy computer box taking up so much space, and try a TinyTuxbox. Here's my attempt to look at what Ubuntu makes of this little box.

Bruce Perens: Microsoft and Apache - What's the Angle?

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Microsoft
OSS

itmanagement.earthweb.com: For a decade, Microsoft was open source's worst enemy, combating it at every turn. But last week Microsoft joined the Apache open source project as a platinum sponsor, promising to put $100,000 per year into a project that beats its own IIS (Internet Information Services) in the market. Microsoft also made some of their patents available for use in GPL software like Linux without a royalty. Has Redmond given up the fight? Or is this just their latest strategy?

Ultamatix may be a worthy successor to Automatix

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Software

linux.com: Some Ubuntu fans out there may remember Automatix, a tool for Ubuntu that allowed easy access to many popular non-free applications and commonly-used audio and video codecs. Automatix was discontinued in March, when its developers moved on to other projects. Now Ultamatix hopes to continue where Automatix left off.

Elonex Webbook notebook review

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

pocket-lint.co.uk: Inside the Elonex Webbook you get a 10.2-inch screen, 1.6GHz VIA C7-M processor, 80GB hard drive, and 512MB of memory. The Webbook comes with the option of two operating systems - Windows XP or the Ubuntu variant of Linux. We tested the Ubuntu version.

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Security Leftovers

10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu News

  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016
    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.
  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more