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Tuesday, 22 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 3:58pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 3:57pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 3:56pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 3:54pm
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 2:28pm
Story Phoronix on Linux 4.4., Graphics Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 2:22pm
Story Leftovers: Servers Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 2:19pm
Story Torvalds and Kernel Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 1:59pm
Story Fedora 23: In The Ocean Again Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 1:45pm
Story Linux 4.4 Features Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 1:32pm

What's Next for LibreOffice?

Filed under
LibO

ostatic.com: LibreOffice 3.3 wasn't even released yet when plans for upcoming versions were being hammered out. A release plan is now in place as well as a development philosophy.

FreeBSD or Debian Linux? FreeBSD or Linux?

Filed under
Linux
BSD

freebsdnews.net: This is an often asked question in newsgroups and forums, isn’t it? The reason for this, is that there is no easy answer. If a straight forward answer could be given, the solution could have been put on Wikipedia. The fact is, that it is not a yes-or-no-answer question.

AppStream, I did it in 2008

Filed under
Software

lxnay.wordpress: It’s the same old story. A stupid has an intuition, the smart comes and steals the idea. The stupid keeps struggling trying to make a living, the smart wins prizes and zillions of $ (best case).

Distro Hoppin`: A Sneak Peek at Bodhi Linux RC

Filed under
Linux

itlure.com: This time, I'll be finger-talking about a rather interesting project that is in heavy development: Bodhi Linux. I got my hands on an early copy (uuuuu...) of the Release Candidate and I wasn't going to let it slide without sharing the XP with my readers.

Tiny Linux Plug Computers: Wall Wart Linux Servers

Filed under
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: Ever wish you could set up a small, efficient server? Maybe you're setting up a mail server for a couple of people, or something to hand out music files over a home network. Do you really need a full-fledged PC with a noisy fan, sucking down 100 watts and heating up the room?

Learning from the open source movement

Filed under
OSS

guardian.co.uk: Open source isn't only for computer geeks. It is the 'intellectual property wing' of social enterprise and probably, globally, its most successful aspect. About three quarters of the internet runs on open source software.

Benchmarks Of The Official KQ ZFS Linux Module

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Last summer we delivered the news that a native ZFS file-system implementation for Linux was coming by an Indian company known as KQ Infotech where they leveraged the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories ZFS Linux code, finished it off in some areas, and took care of the POSIX support. For running todays tests, Ubuntu 10.10 was used with its Linux 2.6.35 server kernel as to use KQ Infotech's official ZFS Linux packages

Sourceforge.net attack

Filed under
Web

sourceforge.net: Yesterday our vigilant operations guys detected a targeted attack against some of our developer infrastructure. The attack resulted in an exploit of several SourceForge.net servers, and we have proactively shut down a handful of developer centric services to safeguard data and protect the majority of our services.

A thought, about worldwide adoption of Linux

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: This is the question that lingers in the minds of many technology enthusiasts; at least for fun, they would have given it a thought – What would happen if Linux was adopted Worldwide?

LibreOffice 3.3: Hands-On With the Free Office Suite

Filed under
LibO

pcworld.com: The LibreOffice project came about late in 2010 when it became increasingly uncertain what Oracle's intentions were for OpenOffice.org, which it acquired after purchasing Sun.

Ubuntu's Warm and Fuzzy Qt Embrace

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxinsider.com: The changes are flying fast and furious in the land of Ubuntu, and one of the many shake-ups causing users joy and consternation is that post-Natty Narwhal, Ubuntu will incorporate Qt interface libraries.

Opera 11.01 Final Released

Filed under
Software

opera.com: We have just released Opera 11.01 (build 1190). This new release adds security fixes and stability improvements, along with some mouse gesture tweaking, for full details see the change log below.

My Ubuntu Adventure

Filed under
Ubuntu

realtegan.blogspot: My little sister Lisa gave me an old computer she had, a laptop that is even older than my now-ancient (by computer ages) laptop. It's a Presario 2200, and had Windows XP installed on it. I decided to install Ubuntu on the new/old computer just to see what would happen.

Arx Fatalis Linux Port Progress

Filed under
Gaming

freegamer.blogspot: The Arx Fatalis porting effort has been going full steam ahead; a lot of developments on that project. They recieved a Wiki sponsored by the PARPG guys, made subreddit to post updates to and have quite a few repositories where the different team members are working on the seperate goals of the project.

Spotlight on Linux: Puppy Linux 5.2

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Puppy Linux began life as a really cool small-sized Linux distribution designed primarily for lower specification hardware while still providing most of the amenities that make Linux fun and usable

Sabayon Linux 5.5 Released

Filed under
Linux

sabayon.org: The best, refined blend of GNU/Linux, coming with bleeding edge edges is eventually here! Say hello to Sabayon Five-point-Fivehh, available in both GNOME and KDE editions!

Aust govt enforces equal rights for open source

Filed under
OSS
  • Aust govt enforces equal rights for open source
  • Leading the govt to open source
  • Open source powers new Aussie space race
  • IT’S MANDATORY: Govt forces open source option

yesterday's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • A List of all the things I love about Microsoft Windows
  • ImageFit, Scale Images Automatically In Firefox
  • Meet the GIMP: Episode 155: Favicon
  • Debian GNU/kFreeBSD development in 2011
  • Is Red Hat Oversold?
  • GCC 4.6 Still Has Too Many Serious Regressions
  • Why I Use Gentoo: Configuration File Management
  • Available: BSD Magazine: BSD’s and Solaris (01-2011)
  • Raphaël Hertzog: My Debian related goals for 2011
  • Zeitgeist for GNOME Shell goes Public (Video)
  • Blizzard Still Has a World of Warcraft Linux Client
  • It took a little more than a year.... but Novell crumbled nevertheless
  • Perl 5.12.3 released
  • CH: Public spending cuts for cantons using or migrating to free software
  • Private messages considered harmful
  • Seif Lotfy: Apologies to GNOME
  • Asa Dotzler: Firefox 4 is so close I can taste it
  • House Subcommittee Revives Mandatory Data Retention Debate
  • Basque Parliament using Drupal

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Should We Abolish User Access to rm?
  • Music tagging made easy with MusicBrainz
  • Quick Tip: How to Replace Your OpenOffice With LibreOffice In Ubuntu
  • Error Installing SQLite3 in Ubuntu
  • Python for Newbies – Part1
  • Look for a string, word, or sentence in a file with Linux grep command | recursively
  • How to make a Striped Background with Gimp
  • Installing Debian on my Ben Nanonote

Setting Up An Android App Build Environment With Eclipse, Android SDK, PhoneGap (Ubuntu 10.10)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial describes how you can set up a development environment for building Android apps on an Ubuntu 10.10 desktop using Eclipse, the Android SDK, and PhoneGap. I will describe how to build Android apps from the command line with PhoneGap and from the GUI with Eclipse and PhoneGap and how to test them in an Android emulator and on a real Android device. PhoneGap allows you to develop your Android applications using web technologies such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (e.g. with JavaScript libraries such as jQuery/jQTouch), and it will turn these web apps into native Android apps (in fact, PhoneGap supports multiple platforms such as Android, iPhone, Palm, Windows Mobile, Symbian, so you can use the same sources to create apps for multiple platforms).

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today's howtos

Oregan unveils new middleware for Linux STBs and Android TV

Oregan Networks, a provider of digital TV software services, has announced the launch of a new set-top box client middleware product for pay-TV operators called SparQ. The software is designed to work on the most challenging and resource-limited STB platforms in the field, making it feasible to introduce new OTT content services and applications on customer devices that were deployed as part of the first wave of IPTV and hybrid broadcast deployments. Read more

KDE Development Updates

  • Revisiting my talk at FOSSASIA summit, 2018
    Earlier this year, I had the chance to speak about one of KDE community’s cool projects that is helpding developers erase the line between desktop and mobile/tablet UI’s with ease. I’m referring to the Kirigami UI framework – a set of QtQuick components targetted at the mobile as well as desktop platforms. This is particularly important to KDE and a lot of projects are now migrating towards a Kirigami UI, particularly keeping in mind the ability to run the applications on the Plasma Mobile.
  • This Week in KDE, Part 2 : OYLG, Workspace KCM, Single/Double Click
    Last weekend, I went to İstanbul to attend Özgür Yazılım ve Linux Günleri (Free Software and Linux Days 2018) to represent LibreOffice. We had 3 presentations during the event about LibreOffice Development and The Open Document Format. We had booth setup with stickers, flyers, roll-up etc. These were all thanks to The Document Foundation’s supports! You can find detailed information about the event from here : https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Events/2018/OYLG2018
  • Watching the Detectives
    For instance, Kevin Ottens has been writing about understanding the KDE community by the “green blobs” method, showing who is active when. Lays Rodrigues has written about using Gource to show Plasma growing up. Nate Graham describes the goings-on in the KDE community nearly every week. Those are, roughly: a metric-, a visual-, and a story-based approach to understanding the community, over different timescales. But understanding of a system doesn’t come from a single dimension, from a single axis of measurement. It comes from mixing up the different views to look the system as a whole.
  • Managing cooking recipes
    I like to cook. And sometimes store my recipes. Over the years I have tried KRecipes, kept my recipes in BasKet notes, in KJots notes, in more or less random word processor documents. I liked the free form entering recipes in various notes applications and word processor documents, but I lacked some kind of indexing them. What I wanted was free-ish text for writing recipes, and some thing that could help me find them by tags I give them. By Title. By how I organize them. And maybe by Ingredient if I don’t know how to get rid of the soon-to-be-bad in my refridgerator.

Phones: Purism, "Jolla Users", De-Googling Android Phones

  • Last Call for Librem 5 Dev Kit: order yours before June 1st 2018
    Purism has finalized the specifications for the Librem 5 development kit and will be placing all the component parts order and fabrication run the first week of June 2018. If you want to have early access to the hardware that will serve as the platform for the Librem 5 phone, you must place your dev kit order before June 1st, 2018. The price for the development kit is now $399, up from the early-bird pricing that was in effect during the campaign and until today. The dev kit is a small batch, “limited edition” product. After this batch, we are not planning for a second run (as the production of the phone itself will replace the dev kit in 2019).
  • Top 3 mobile phones
    When purchasing a new mobile phone, there are hundreds of models to choose from and, there are dozens of “excellent” or top-rated brands to consider. Therefore, it can be difficult to know what you are getting. Buying the phone upfront, on contract or buying a smartphone on finance are all options that need to be considered too. If you are ready to invest in a new smartphone consider these three models. Galaxy S9 Plus. This phone by Samsung is sleek, elegant, has a vibrant screen, resolution and excellent fingerprint scanner. The curved edges give it a distinct look and style. It is the Plus model, so has a huge touchscreen which is extremely intuitive. Quality speakers, outdoor body/casing and internal functionality make it a top-choice for a new smartphone.
  • De-Googling my phone, reloaded
    In this area the situation is now much happier than my first post indicated. As promised I used trainline.eu for booking some tickets (both for Deutsche Bahn and also on Thalys), and indeed this does a fine job. Same price, European rebate cards like BahnCard 50 are supported, and being able to book with a lot of European train services with just one provider is really neat. However, I’m missing a lot of DB navigator’s great features: realtime information and alternatives, seat selection, car position indicator, regional tariffs, or things like “Länderticket”. Fortunately it turns out that DB Navigator works just great with a trick: Disable the “Karte anzeigen” option in the menu, and it will immediately stop complaining about missing Play Services after each action. Also, logging in with your DB account never finishes, but after terminating and restarting the app you are logged in and everything works fine. That might be a “regular” bug or just a side effect without Play Services.