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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 03 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mirantis Launches Vendor Database for OpenStack Cloud Computing Rianne Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 11:23am
Story GTK+ 3.12.2 Released with Numerous Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 6:58am
Story Drone quadrocopter boasts 14MP camera, runs Linux Rianne Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 6:51am
Story Pros' Secrets and Red Hat 7 and PCLinuxOS 2014.05 Reviews Rianne Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 6:45am
Story HP Joins OpenDaylight Open Source SDN Project Rianne Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 6:41am
Story GNOME's Tracker 1.0.1 Gets a Ton of Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 9:16pm
Story Marmalade CEO: Tizen is App Developers' Entryway to Wearables Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 8:43pm
Story Trinity 1.4 Linux Fuzz Tester Released Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 5:41pm
Story Sauerbraten-Forked Tesseract Makes Its Initial Release Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 5:06pm
Story 'Tablet for hackers' no longer on sale Roy Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 4:22pm

Ubuntu pocket guide and handy Linux tips

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.techrepublic.com: This week, it seems like everyone is writing about how Windows 7 spells the demise of Linux (or not) or, alternatively, how Linux has contributed to the decline of Microsoft. I figure we’ve got several weeks left to kick them around, though, don’t you? So with that in mind, I found some practical resources to highlight.

How To Choose The Best Linux For Your Business

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com: For IT decision makers in small and midsize-businesses, Linux is all about choice. But the dizzying array of different distros, service, and support options can make the choice a challenge. This guide to understanding the differences will help you pick the distro your business needs.

NVIDIA Releases Four New Linux Drivers

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: The NVIDIA 180.22 Linux driver was released less than three weeks ago, but today NVIDIA has released a new 180.xx display driver update. In addition, NVIDIA has updated all three of their legacy display drivers.

Font Fun in OpenSolaris and Beyond

Filed under
OS

blogs.eweek.com: For the past few weeks, I've been running OpenSolaris 2008.11 on my main work notebook. One of the roughest edges I've found on my OpenSolaris installation is the system's font rendering within the Firefox Web browser.

KDE 4.2 Released

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: It has been a full year since the beginning of the KDE 4 series and today the KDE community proudly announces the release of KDE 4.2, "The Answer".

Also: Breathe KDE 4.2, Introducing Lancelot
And: My favourite KDE 4.2 feature: Task Bar And Window Grouping

10 ways to help users transition to Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: There’s no reason why switching to Linux should be traumatic for your users (or stressful for you). As Jack Wallen explains, you can set them up to succeed if you approach things the right way.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 56

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #56 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: FOSDEM 2009, Top 25 Most Dangerous Programming Errors, and Novell’s 2009 Technical Strategy and Process.

GCC Libraries Get Updated License Exception

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org: Today the Free Software Foundation (FSF), together with the GCC Steering Committee and the Software Freedom Law Center, announced the release of a new GCC Runtime Library Exception.

Mozilla contributes $100,000 to fund Ogg development

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: Mozilla has given the Wikimedia Foundation a $100,000 grant intended to fund development of the Ogg container format and the Theora and Vorbis media codecs.

Q&A with Paul Frields at Red Hat

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

neowin.net: Just after Christmas, Neowin was given the chance for a community Q&A with Paul Frields of Red Hat. Paul has worked with Fedora since 2003, and became the Fedora Project Leader in January last year. Along with a few other things, Paul is also chairman of the Fedora Project Board, which makes decisions on how Fedora will move forward.

Images, hacking, and Xfce

Filed under
Software
  • The Linux Alternative Series: Image Editing

  • Top 10 Linux Hacking Tools
  • Xfce 4.6 Release Candidate 1 (Capybara) released

What do KDE 4.2 and Windows 7 have in common?

Filed under
KDE
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: I tried, I really did, to like KDE 4.2 I really didn't like the early versions of KDE 4. I then tried KDE 4.1. I hated it. I kept getting told by people that I just didn't get it.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Remote Desktop Between Ubuntu/Linux and Windows, Part II

  • Full screen mode with toolbars in Opera
  • Inkscape Tutorial - Raised Lettering Effect
  • 7 tips how to make your computer healthy
  • List drives by UUID in Ubuntu

Desktop distros inch closer

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: MEPIS and Mandriva are moving closer to new releases of their Linux distributions, and a French project called Jolicloud has posted a screen (pictured) from its upcoming netbook distro. MEPIS posted SimplyMEPIS 8.0 RC2, and Mandriva released its second alpha for Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring.

Also: SimplyMEPIS 8.0 RC2: On the Home Stretch

Windows Kicks Linux to the Curb? You’ve got to be kidding

Filed under
Linux
  • Windows Kicks Linux to the Curb? You’ve got to be kidding

  • Linux to spend eternity in shadow of 'little blue E'
  • Microsoft's Netbook Woes Also Mean Linux Yays ... Right?
  • Linux dead at hands of Windows 7? Horse puckey!
  • No Linux killer

Torvalds, KDE 4, and the Media Circus

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: Just as KDE 4 is poised to prove itself with the user-friendly 4.2 release, the year-long controversy over the changes from the KDE 3 release has ignited again. This time, the spark was a interview comment by Linus Torvalds that he had switched to GNOME and thought that the KDE release had been mis-managed.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 287

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Report: Linux.conf.au 2009

  • News: Ubuntu and Fedora adopt ext4, Slackware prepares for KDE 4.2, Mandriva developers move to Red Hat, ClarkConnect reveals new features
  • Released last week: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3, Granular Linux 1.0
  • Upcoming releases: Pardus Linux 2008.2
  • Site news: Update on package management cheatsheet
  • New distribution: Bee Linux, Kuki Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

plasma is now plasma-desktop

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: When Plasma was first ripping its way out of my meandering thoughts, I was rather preoccupied with one thought only: "I need something that can improve on kicker ..." When I eventually added the desktop to that thinking I felt I was making progress and getting ambitious.

Linux Monday: command lines and vintage keyboards

Filed under
Linux

jdeeth.blogspot: If you're younger than about 30, you probably don't have much memory of the DOS prompt. And about the third thing you've heard about Linux is "you have to type in commands a lot."

Are you an "average" user?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: Everybody uses in their arguments the yardstick of the average user. This is the user that people measure the suitability of an operating system and form their arguments around. What exactly is an average user?

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.
  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.
  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
    Sysadmins can use the product to improve their skills or prepare for an interview by practicing some day to day job scenarios. There is an invitation list opened for the first testers of the product.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
    PINE, the rival company of Raspberry Pi and maker of the $20 Pine A64, has just announced its two below $100-priced Linux laptops, known as PINEBOOK. The affordable Linux laptop is powered by Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-bit processor and comes with an 11.6" or 14" monitor.
  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.