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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Even Linus Torvalds Needs to be Civil srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 11:16pm
Story Join the Most Technical Mardi Gras Parade In History srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 7:29pm
Story Raspberry Pi Camera Module Review – Eye Pi srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 7:27pm
Story Aggregate System Menu arrives for Shell 3.10 srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 7:24pm
Story Tips To Make Ubuntu Look Cool srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:35pm
Story Features Approved This Week For Fedora 20 srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:33pm
Story The H is closing down srlinuxx 2 19/07/2013 - 5:30pm
Story ROSA Desktop R1 GNOME preview srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:27pm
Story A Planetary Nebula That Looks Like the Firefox Logo srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 3:57pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 9:19am

Second Alpha Release of Amarok 2.0, Codenamed "Aulanerk"

Filed under
Software

dot.kde.org: The Amarok team is proud to present the second Alpha of Amarok 2.0. Development is moving at full speed and a lot of bugs have been fixed since Alpha 1, as well as features polished.

RIP XGL

Filed under
Software

dev.compiz-fusion.org: The X server technology that gave us Compiz, resulting possibly in inspiration of KDE4’s kwin effects - Xgl is no more. Xgl will also not be shipped on openSUSE 11.1 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 11.

Bit more here

VIA Publishes Three Programming Guides

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Since VIA announced their open-source strategy earlier this year, all they had provided was a simple kernel frame-buffer driver. However, VIA has now made available three programming guides that cover their PadLock, CX700, and VX800/820 products.

tigers and elephants

Filed under
Microsoft

opensource.org: Gandhiji said "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win." If we do not allow Microsoft to join us, we can never "win".

some odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Where have you been my whole life? (Pkgfiles script)

  • Cloud Computing: When Computers Really Do Rule
  • Mandriva 2008.1 on the Eee
  • When the Pros Are Out to Lunch, the Rabble Take Over
  • Open source + open data = Open cloud
  • Banshee, Music Player by Day, Comedian by Night

few other howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • RPMing the night away!

  • How to make QT applications look better in GNOME
  • How To Tell If An Application Is 64-bit In Ubuntu Hardy Heron

Review: NimbleX 2008 - Going Places, Quickly

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: NimbleX is a small, versatile operating system which is able to boot from mini CDs, flash memory, hard drives and even from the network. Based on Slackware, it uses Linux-Live scripts and comes with a reputation for speed and excellent package choices.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 32

Filed under
SUSE

news.opensuse.org: Issue #32 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: openSUSE 11.0 Survey, openSUSE 11.0 PromoDVD, and openSUSE 11.1 Alpha1 is Available.

Puppy Linux 4.0

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: This month Linux Format Magazine included Puppy Linux 4.0 on their disc and I thought I’d check it out. I’m mainly focusing on how things have changed and improved or gotten worse since Puppy 3.01. I burned the disc and put it into my test rig computer.

Website for the KDE Utilities Launched

Filed under
KDE
Web

dot.kde.org: The family of KDE websites has got a new member, the site for the fine utilities applications from the module kdeutils. Despite being one of the first modules, kdeutils has always been without its own website. No longer. At utils.kde.org you can now find a lot of information about the KDE Utilities.

Debian 5.0 “Lenny”

Filed under
Linux

jaysonrowe.wordpress: I’ve decided to do something I’ve never done before - I’m running multiple Linux distributions, on different computers. I have my main desktop running Debian “Lenny” (currently the “testing” release.

tar.gz is the best package format for complex programs

Filed under
Software

antirez.com: There are two kind of Unix programs. The real problem is for complex programs with tons of dependencies, like firefox, amule, openoffice and a lot of less famous unix applications. To compile this applications is hard for the newbie and tedious for the expert Unix user so it's mandatory to have a binary distribution if the project goal is to reach a big user base.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • GIMP Tricks: Fake Fill Flash

  • Create video animations with Inkscape, ImageMagick and FFmpeg
  • Apt and Dpkg Tips

Geek Sheet: A Tweaker’s Guide to Solid State Disks (SSDs) and Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.zdnet.com: Is 20th-century conventional Winchester multi-platter, multi-head random-access disk technology too quaint for you? Want to run your PC or server on storage devices that consume far less energy than the traditional alternatives? Do you have $500-$1500 in spare change lying around? Then Solid State Drives (SSDs) are for you.

17 ways Greasemonkey can revolutionise Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

pcadvisor.co.uk: Do you get frustrated and angry when a poorly designed website doesn’t load quick enough or is only partially visible? Well Greasemonkey, a free Firefox add-on, offers hundreds of free script to improve the functionality of websites and the net.

10 Download Managers Available in Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

qozan.com: A download manager is a computer program designed to download files from the Internet,unlike a web browser, which is mainly intended to browse web pages on the World Wide Web (with file downloading being of secondary importance).

KDE 4.1: What to Expect

Filed under
KDE

dawningvalley.com: Recently, Gnome’s been gaining a lot of ground on its KDE counterpart in the desktop environment wars. The KDE developers were hoping to change this with KDE 4, the new radical release of KDE, but it was not to be.

Is OpenSolaris in hot water?

Filed under
OS

linux.com: Here's how it works: Novell owns Unix's IP (intellectual property). SCO sold Unix's IP to Sun. Sun then included some Unix IP into Solaris. Finally, Sun open sourced Solaris as OpenSolaris. Sounds like trouble, doesn't it?

Tabs in file managers

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: These days, everyone agrees that tabs belong in webbrowsers. As I’m writing this article, I have nine tabs open, one to write this and eight with the articles I’ll link in it. I think tabs are one of the best things the new generation of web browsers have. But do they belong in file managers?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Gentoo x64 - Performance Shock

  • On Governance
  • OSCON 2008 in photos
  • CrunchBang Linux 8.04.02 Release Notes
  • How many nautilus windows can 882.7mb of RAM handle?
  • Marc Fleury starts an open-source home automation project
  • OLS: Kernel documentation, and submitting kernel patches
  • Google Hands Oregon State $300,000 for Open Source
  • OpenID gets the third degree at OSCON
  • Open Source Skype Scuppered
  • Every OS Sucks
  • More Linux and Unix Laughs For The Weekend
  • Howto Use Bootchart to Time and Track your Boot Sequence
  • How to reset/recover the ROOT password in openSUSE
  • Linux Outlaws 48 - LugRadio Live
  • Software achieves Linux compliance
  • Asustek to extend battery life and storage capacity for Eee PCs in 2H08
  • Open Source - What is the Total Cost of Ownership?
  • Open-source electronic voting
  • 3 open-source challenges: cloud computing, open Web, mobile
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