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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story CIO Insight: British Gas IT boss on open source, smart meters, cloud and digital skills Rianne Schestowitz 18/08/2015 - 12:07pm
Story Google Pushes Android One To Africa Rianne Schestowitz 18/08/2015 - 11:59am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2015 - 11:23am
Story today's howtos and software Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2015 - 11:16am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2015 - 11:15am
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2015 - 11:14am
Story Leftovers: GNOME Software Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2015 - 11:12am
Story Leftovers: Debian Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2015 - 11:07am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2015 - 11:04am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2015 - 11:03am

FOSS Security Updates vs Microsoft Patch Day

Filed under
OSS
Security

blog.eracc.com: It is almost that time again. The ritual of installing Microsoft patches released on the second Tuesday of each month to fix security problems. It is an ironic coincidence that I have received update notices from Mandriva for software installed on my Linux PC systems as well this weekend.

Fun with mouse pointer themes

Filed under
Software
HowTos

cristalinux.blogspot: Up until recently, I had not really played around with mouse cursor themes at all. I thought it was like Windows in the old days, where the most you could get was a different color, perhaps a cursor providing a 3D "illusion" Look&Feel to it. I couldn't have been more wrong.

First Look At Phoronix's 2010 Linux Graphics Survey Results

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: Earlier this month we started once again our annual Linux Graphics Survey in which we poll our readers about their choices and opinions concerning graphics cards, display drivers, and other graphics / X.Org related features of the Linux desktop.

Why I don't rant on Linux any more

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe.blogspot: I had an interesting comment show up on one of my posts. The reader said, in part: "I know it has been a while since you ranted something on Linux..."

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • opensuse KDE bug triage report
  • KDE Wordpress Users Unite: You Now Have a KDE Air Theme
  • Firefox 4 JavaScript Benchmarks – Showing Improvements
  • gphotoframe 1.0.1 released
  • KDE Science: New Forum, Mailing List and News
  • Users Benefit from openSUSE KDE Repository
  • Lightspark 0.4.4.2 Brings Plug-in Based Audio
  • OLF 2010, day 1

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Getting IP address in Perl
  • improving Ubuntu performance on older hardware
  • Get organized with Getting Things GNOME
  • Change the time zone in Linux - using command line
  • fix dependency errors when installing qgis-plugin-grass
  • How to execute a task ‘at’ the time you want..?

MS now owns Qt

Filed under
Microsoft
  • That Other OS is Cripple-ware
  • Russia Uses Microsoft to Suppress Dissent
  • Watch out KDE! MS now owns Qt by proxy…

Upcoming Artwork

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Upcoming Artwork For Xubuntu 10.10
  • New Maverick Sound Indicator Match Radiance
  • New Ubuntu "Extras" Repository Is Now Live
  • 5 Beautiful Elementary-ish Gnome Themes

Linux Action Show

Filed under
KDE
Linux
  • The Linux Action Show! #s13e07 | Linux Mint Debian Review
  • KDEMU – Sebastian Kügler

Review: Linux Mint 9 KDE

Filed under
Linux

g33q.co.za: A Mint derivative where the main color is BLUE. Yes I know that it is less than a month before Ubuntu Maverick Meerkat arrives, and then Linux Mint will follow with their releases soon after, but Mint 9 KDE warrants special attention.

Menu Spectrum: Understanding Start Menus Across Different Platforms

Filed under
Software

anditosan.blogspot: Here is the long awaited review of some of the developments on the launch menu sector. Hopefully putting these menus side by side will help us make sense of what we use in order to launch applications on our operating systems.

Try Kazam, A New Screencasting Application For Linux

Filed under
Software

webupd8.org: Kazam is a brand new screencasting application for Linux which records both the audio and video in an .mkv format and you can either save it to your computer or directly upload it to YouTube.

Creating An NFS-Like Standalone Storage Server With GlusterFS On Ubuntu 10.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a standalone storage server on Ubuntu 10.04. Instead of NFS, I will use GlusterFS here. The client system will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.

Minimalistic Computing: TinyCore Linux 3.0

Filed under
Linux

linuxondesktop.blogspot: If you thought Damn Small Linux or Puppy Linux are small, hold your breath. Tiny Core Linux is a minimalistic GNU/Linux distribution based on Linux kernel 2.6, it comes with graphical environment and provides facility to download and install applications from the Internet and it fits into 10MB of ISO file.

Reflection: KDE 4.5

Filed under
KDE

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: I've been using KDE 4.5 for the last 2 weeks (since I reviewed it), and though I generally like what I see, I think my first experiences with Linux (i.e. with a GNOME desktop) have already biased me against fully accepting KDE 4.5.

Linpus Lite 1.4 screenshots

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Linpus Lite 1.4 is the latest distribution that I am currently reviewing. While the review is in progress, I thought posting a few screenshots is in order.

COMPIZ Showcase: What’s coming up in 0.9.2

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: Development of course is progressing nicely, now as much to the point where we can do blog posts about progress, like I did back in 2007 and 2008! We’ve had some great community contributions and new developers jump on board and the project is rapidly regaining its health from the slow down in 2009.

Modern OS on ancient hardware.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: I am currently using, at this very moment, while I am typing, the latest completely updated version of Gentoo. I can surf the net, play movies and my window manager even has transparency.

Windows or Linux: Which is easier to fix?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

blogs.techrepublic.com: I like to break stuff. Why? It means I get to find things out about what I’ve broken and it means I get to repair what I have broken. And operating systems are no exception.

Demystifying OpenGL Desktop Effects

Filed under
KDE

blog.martin-graesslin.com: My last blog post about the driver situation in the KDE Plasma Workspaces in version 4.5 caused quite some discussion. This is great and really required. But it also showed that there are quite some incorrect information about the current and future OpenGL compositing.

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More in Tux Machines

LMMS Guide Part 1: Creating Simple Melodies Using Sounds And Instruments

​LMMS stands for Linux Multimedia Studio. It is a very good open-source program that is used to create music tracks using sound files, predefined instruments, and sound effects. LMMS has versions for Windows and macOS in addition to Linux. Their website, of course, lists all of their features offered to users. This article will attempt to provide practical guides and tips for composing songs using LMMS. Read
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How To Create Shell Scripts

Having to type the same command over and over again can be a daunting task and tiresome for that matter. The shell scripts are really easy to create and run saving you from a lot of misery and anguish if you really prefer using the terminal over using the GUI for running tasks. Read
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Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.