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Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Desktop GNU/Linux Wins Roy Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 8:11pm
Story Samsung Gear S UK release gets delayed Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 4:56pm
Story Free Software (and Freedom) in Kosovo Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 4:49pm
Story Tux Machines DDOS Attack Mostly Contained Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 4:43pm
Story LibreOffice vs. OpenOffice: Why LibreOffice Wins Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 4:37pm
Story An Intel-Based Ubuntu Touch Tablet Is Planning To Launch Soon Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 4:29pm
Story Guake Review – The Last Drop-Down Terminal You'll Ever Use Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 3:07pm
Story Ubuntu's Unity 8 desktop removes the Amazon search 'spyware' Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 2:55pm
Story Rebuilding tech in Afghanistan with open source Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 2:47pm
Story [ANNOUNCE] xorg-server 1.16.99.901 Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 2:43pm

Make Firefox Social: Four Social Media Add-Ons You'll Love

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux-mag.com: Social media addict or social media newbie? Either way, we’ve got four must-have Firefox extensions that will make using popular social media sites much easier and more seamless within the world’s most popular open source browser.

What Linux cannot do

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: There are so many articles out on the internet tubes that I don't know which one to shake a stick at. So to prevent my brain from going totally rusty I decided to pull out some points of what Linux can not do.

Five Improvements For KDE 4.4

Filed under
KDE

itnewstoday.com: KDE 4.3 is a great desktop, but there are improvements I think should be made to make it perfect. I’m hoping some of these ideas will be considered for the next release.

Top 5 things we'd all love to see from System76

blog.thesilentnumber.me: We already love System76 for being truly dedicated to open source and offering Ubuntu exclusively on their entire lineup, so naturally we simply must ask for more! I have five simple, but big requests:

CentOS 5.3 - Serious Linux for serious people

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: CentOS is not your everyday Linux. It's a server distribution, meant to be used in production environment where users do not care about what applications they have installed. It's a distro that you will most likely run without any GUI, reboot once every other year or so, if that, and upgrade only when you really must. What I'm going to do today is a sort of a capital sin.

3 Gimp Plugins For Photographers

Filed under
GIMP

linuxloop.com: In the age of digital photography, almost everyone performs at least a few edits on their photos. For simple thing, programs like F-Spot or Google’s Picasa may be enough, but you may also need something more. That’s where Gimp does an excellent job.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • CentOS 4.8 finally there?
  • Gentoo and Arch Linux
  • Fixing Linux
  • Novell Executive Sees Hope For Client Side Linux
  • Karmic: Gnome Control Centre
  • DISA promotes open source
  • Balanzan, a nice looking theme for Ubuntu
  • Interview With Stephen Lau – Songbird
  • Interview: Carla Schroder
  • Under the Hood With VLC Media Player: 4 Resources
  • Two Notable Linux Updates
  • Linux, FUD and Misunderstanding
  • Penguins, Lizards and Apple's X Factor: How Famous OS Logos Got Started
  • Linux Kernel in a Nutshell
  • Africa's Lessons for OSCON
  • What a difference fontconfig makes

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Manage fonts in Ubuntu with Font Manager

  • Encrypt Files with GPG
  • Installing GIMP 2.7 development snapshot on Ubuntu 9.04
  • How-To: Cleaning up Gentoo to get more free disk space
  • How to Set Up Virtual Web Hosting with Apache
  • Updating FreeBSD Using CVSup through HTTP Proxy
  • TIP: GDM Server authentication error message
  • Smooth Flash Playback By Hacking Firefox
  • Protect your grub by applying a password to it (grub-md5-crypt is broken)
  • Increase The Maximum Sound Level in Ubuntu Linux

Top ten Linux distributions

Filed under
Linux

mybroadband.co.za: Ubuntu stands out as the most popular Linux distribution but which other versions make up the top ten?

What’s New in Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: WorksWithU reported a couple weeks ago on new features in Ubuntu 9.10, like kernel mode setting and GRUB 2, that are likely to please geeks. But Ubunti 9.10 (codenamed Karmic Koala) will also sport changes aimed at traditional users. Here’s a look at a few of them.

40 years of Unix

Filed under
OS

bbc.co.uk: The computer world is notorious for its obsession with what is new. Anything that survives for more than one generation of processors deserves a nod. Think then what the Unix operating system deserves because in August 2009, it celebrates its 40th anniversary.

Novell vs. Red Hat: How their Linux strategies affect your data center

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: More than 90% of all commercial Linux server subscriptions are from Novell and Red Hat, with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) and Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), respectively. A Gartner report gives Red Hat more than 60% of the paid Linux market, and Novell more than 30%. Why is Red Hat the Linux market share leader?

Distro Review: Pardus Linux 2009

Filed under
Linux

danlynch.org/blog: This week I revisited a distribution I first wrote about back in 2007, Pardus Linux. It’s developed by the Turkish National Research Institute of Electronics and Cryptography, it has its own package management system called PISI (Packages Installed Successfully, as Intended), and it’s not based on any other Linux distribution, which makes quite a change these days. I was eager to see how it had developed since our last encounter.

Austrumi Linux 1.9.3

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: I thought I’d take a look at Austrumi Linux in this review. Austrumi Linux is based on Slackware and is pretty tiny in terms of size, weighing in at about 108MB.

What Free Software, Linux and Microsoft Have Taught Us

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com: All in all, I think Free Software users know from practical experience how to question and why to question; we also have learned about freedom in a way that most people don't get to--as a practical reality, an experience, not just a slogan.

Linux Needs Open Multimedia on the Web

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: The state of web multimedia on Linux is pitiful. Proprietary codecs, plug-ins and closed standards are helping to keep Linux a second rate citizen. What Linux needs is not another proprietary framework like Moonlight, but more open standards. Can Google help by making YouTube a Theora-fest?

When the Contribution Model Fails

Filed under
OSS

bushweed.blogspot: I'm a big advocate of Open Source software. However Open Source has it's flaws. The contribution model may be one of it's greatest strengths, but is also a big weakness.

Linux vs Windows 7

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

tuxradar.com: It's something of a tradition that we pit the latest version of Windows against our trusty old operating system. This isn't because we want to raise the profile of Windows, or ignite further flamewars on which is better or worse. It's about understanding the market and understanding the competition.

5 Reasons to Get Excited about Linux on the Netbook

Filed under
Linux

readwriteweb.com: Late last year, we boldly proclaimed that your next computer might be a Linux PC. Thanks to the ever-growing market for the low-end machines dubbed "netbooks," this seemed like a real possibility at the time. But then...

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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.