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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Linux 3.14 Kernel Will Likely Be Released Today Rianne Schestowitz 31/03/2014 - 12:43pm
Story Beautiful Zukitwo Theme Is the First One for GNOME 3.12 Rianne Schestowitz 31/03/2014 - 12:40pm
Story Why Linux Mint is a worthwhile Windows XP replacement Roy Schestowitz 31/03/2014 - 3:20am
Story Tech 101: What Is Open Source Software? Roy Schestowitz 31/03/2014 - 3:18am
Story 10 Free, Open-Source Replacements for Commercial Applications Chris7mas 31/03/2014 - 1:28am
Story digiKam Software Collection 4.0.0-beta4 is out.. Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2014 - 7:44pm
Story Qt3D, QtOpenCL Spark New Interest Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2014 - 7:41pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2014 - 1:08pm
Story Red Hat Banking on OpenStack for Future Growth Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2014 - 7:23am
Story NVIDIA's GeForce Driver On Ubuntu 14.04 Runs The Same As Windows 8.1 Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2014 - 6:58am

10 things Linux does better than OS X

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Linux OS X is heralded for its friendliness, but according to Jack Wallen, it falls short in many other respects. Find out why he says Linux is superior in everything from flexibility to portability to cost.

Forrester: 92 percent of enterprises look to open source for quality

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OSS For anyone still stuck in the twentieth-century mindset that open source is just about Linux, or even solely about Linux and middleware like the JBoss application server, Forrester Research's new report, "Open Source Paves The Way For The Next Generation Of Enterprise IT," should be an eye opener.

xfmedia player for Ubuntu - bye bye Audacious

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Software After a recent upgrade from Ubuntu 7.10 to 8.10, which works really well for me, I discovered to my dismay that xmms is not in the repositories anymore. The prefered replacement now is 'audacious' which around 12% to 14% of my CPU.

Installing Programmes In Linux Vs. Windows: Which Is Easier?

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linuxcanuck.wordpress: I don’t usually do follow ups. This one illustrates a point that I made in the previous post and it underscores the kind of thinking that I was referring to in my article and is worth singling it out. "What is hard about clicking on an exe?”

When Linux fails

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Linux (Jeremy Allison): Recently I was able to visit the Ontario Linux Fest. I love shows like Ontario, as they're run by amateurs, not by professional show companies. Ian had gone to Africa as part of an organization called Geekcorps, dedicated to promoting IT use in developing nations.

A no-fly zone to protect Linux from patent trolls

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Linux On Tuesday a consortium of technology companies, including IBM (IBM), will launch a new initiative designed to help shield the open-source software community from threats posed by companies or individuals holding dubious software patents and seeking payment for alleged infringements by open-source software products.

NimbleX Linux - 94% satisfaction

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Linux On the surface, NimbleX is another Linux distribution, shipping as a live CD, meant to be used primarily as a live CD, with the optional installation. It is based on Slackware and designed to fit under 256MB to allow it to be used from small USB thumb drives.

What’s Been Bugging you in Ubuntu 8.10?

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Ubuntu When it’s about time for a new version of Ubuntu to arrive, usually I end up installing a late alpha or beta version before the final release. Recently I did get time to take a stab at working out some of the issues I have been having.

The future of climate change is in Linux's hands

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Linux The Millennium Simulations, an earth modeling venture at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, will allow scientists to model the changes in the world's climate over the last millennium as well as centuries into the future.

SimplyMEPIS 8.0 Moves Closer to Final Release with Beta 6

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Linux In beta 6, the kernel has been updated to upstream version and the extra drivers have been rebuilt for the new kernel. This kernel release fixes an error in the last release that resulted in the tg3 driver being disabled.

Review: Songbird 1.0

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Software Songbird has been one of those media players that's been an enigma of sorts, a player that tries to be an all in everything player, an iTunes competitor, and so much more, and yet seemed to ultimately try to do too much, and yet succeed at too little. At least that was my impression of it in it's beta stages. Has that changed these days?

A Better Office .docx Converter

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OOo There's plenty of ways to convert Microsoft Office 2007 file formats (.docx, .xlsx, .pptx) to Now 3.0 imports these Office OpenXML files natively, but natively doesn't mean a fluent translation.

The evolution of a new Ubuntu User

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Ubuntu The new Linux Ubuntu user is not a rare species nowadays so it's time to spend some time studying that interesting creature. This case study will have a look at The Linux newb and his self-proclaimed "day-to-day log of my conversion from Windows to Linux".

Google OS gOS - if at first you don't succeed...

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Linux gOS, the brains trust behind the failed $200 Linux-based “gPC” at WalMart, has seen fit to throw the dice one more time, introducing an operating system called Cloud that lets your computer boot into a browser. I, for one, welcome this innovation. I've always been a fan of neutering the most versatile machine in human history, restricting its use to only a small subset of the intended functionality. Yeah, this one's a winner from the start.

Test Center preview: Fedora turns 10

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Linux There comes a point in the life of any hard-core Linux user when the idea of digging about to find yet another obscure piece of software, compiling the code, and integrating it into your daily routine just seems annoying, not compelling. This is where Fedora comes through. Red Hat's open source standard bearer and mineshaft canary is still everything to every Linux power user.

5 Tips for free software advocates

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OSS Free software advocacy is something I do — both for a living and as a hobby. Over the years I’ve gleaned a few best practice tips and I thought I’d pass them on.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 281

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This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • First Look: VectorLinux 6.0 Beta 2

  • News: Mandrake CEO responds to community, Novell/SUSE sales, OpenSolaris benchmarks, Ovatio awards, Omega 10 Desktop, DragonFly BSD overview
  • Released last week: OpenSolaris 2008.11, Puppy Linux 4.1.2
  • Upcoming releases: Linux Mint 6
  • New additions: OzOs
  • New distribution: CentServer
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Notes from the field: Fedora 10 and OpenSUSE 11.1 RC1

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blogbeebe.blogspot: Over the weekend I had the opportunity to install Fedora 10 on a Dell Latitude D630 notebook and to tweak the OpenSUSE 11.1 installation.

Top Five Reasons to Love Compiz Fusion in Linux

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Software So, you’ve just switched to Linux, probably to the Ubuntu distribution, due to its popularity. Come on, don’t lie - the main reason you switched is because you wanted all the effects from Compiz Fusion you saw on Youtube.

Review: Open-Source Office Suites Compared

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Software In search of an alternative to Microsoft Office, we test, StarOffice from Sun, IBM's Lotus Symphony, KOffice for Linux, and AbiWord.

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.