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Tuesday, 12 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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KOffice 2.2: Is It Ready Yet?

Filed under
Software

asinen.org: KOffice 2.2 was recently released and can be “used for real work”. Conveniently, just after 2.2 was released, I found myself needing to put together a presentation for Akademy – so what to use?

HP to buy slim Linux OS from Phoenix

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com (IDG): Hewlett-Packard will buy Linux-based quick-boot OS and client virtualization assets from Phoenix Technologies for US$12 million, Phoenix said on Thursday.

Linux could ease schools tech crunch

Filed under
Linux

mercurynews.com: Maybe the answer for local schools facing daunting technology challenges lies with the penguins.

Linux-powered iPad-like tablets can't come quickly enough

Filed under
Mac

blogs.computerworld: Apple has long had a history of being arrogant. But, more often than not, they've been able to back it up by the quality of their products. But now, with Apple locking out Adobe Flash and Google Ads, not to mention their cute trick of setting up an HTML 5 demo site that only works with Apple's own Safari Web browser, I think Apple has overstepped their authority.

A new contributor agreement for Fedora

Filed under
Linux

opensource.com: A little over a month ago, the Fedora Project announced a plan to replace the existing Fedora Individual Contributor License Agreement (FICLA) with something new, which we've imaginatively titled the Fedora Project Contributor Agreement (FPCA).

Dear FSF, It’s not you it’s me

Filed under
OSS

the-gay-bar.com: I’ve been using FLOSS on my computers pretty much exclusively for about 5 or 6 years now and I don’t see me going back, but I have started to feel some sort of disconnect to one of the leading institutions of FLOSS lately: The Free Software Foundation (FSF).

Ubuntu Lucid Lynx: free OS that Just Works

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Ubuntu

boingboing.net: Today, I got caught up enough from my tour to update my ThinkPad to the latest version of Ubuntu. Lucid Lynx went in like butter. The update ran unattended, took about 1h including downloading the whole OS, updated all of my apps without a hitch, and is running smoothly.

KDE 3 vs. KDE 4: Which Linux Desktop Is Right for You?

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: Many users are still using KDE 3. For whatever the reasons, several distributions continue to cater to the preference, including aLinux, Knoppix and MEPIS, all of which offer GNU/Linux with KDE 3.0 as the desktop. This raises the question: How do the two series of KDE releases compare?

Just in time for the World Cup: Firefox Cup!

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: 32 national teams are ready to “take the field now, unify us, make as feel proud…” at the FIFA World Cup South Africa 2010, and Mozilla is joining the celebration with the Firefox Cup.

Parallel Realities: Retro-themed Linux games

Filed under
Gaming

linuxjournal.com: The Parallel Realities website offers a collection of simple, mostly SDL based action games. They're all fairly lightweight and might make good boredom beaters on a less powerful machine, or failing that, a handy distraction while waiting for something to complete in the background.

MeeGo Gains Industry Momentum

efytimes.com: The MeeGo Netbook User Experience highlights include building on the latest open source technologies, instant access to synchronized calendar, tasks, appointments, recently used files and real-time social networking updates through the home screen and aggregation of social networking content.

EU's Internet chief warns states against choosing proprietary software as standards

Filed under
OSS

latimes.com (AP): The European Union's top Internet official took aim at Microsoft Corp. on Thursday, warning that governments can accidentally lock themselves into one company's software for decades by setting it as a standard for their technology systems.

Cyber War: Microsoft a weak link in national security

Filed under
Microsoft

arstechnica.com: "Microsoft has vast resources, literally billions of dollars in cash, or liquid assets reserves. Microsoft is an incredibly successful empire built on the premise of market dominance with low-quality goods."

Virtual Users/Domains With Postfix, Courier, MySQL, SquirrelMail (Ubuntu 10.04)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I'll also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database Postfix uses.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • 5 Tools to Develop AAA Games
  • Should universities become open source tech democracies?
  • Ulteo has been selected to join Microsoft France idEES
  • Pessulus, Lockdown Editor, restrict/lock stuff
  • Open Source and Unicorns
  • Ingres VectorWise goes GA, open source by end of year
  • 10 considerations for maintaining open source in your organization
  • Can FOSS Skills Be Measured?
  • Openoffice.org-ogltrans, OptiPNG, Advanced PNG Optimizer. and Ospics
  • blu-ray on gentoo
  • OSI Committee Chairs Election for 2010-2011
  • Making Open-Source Software Free and Fabulous
  • Linux Outlaws 154 - The Big Android Shootout
  • Announcing the KDE e.V. Supporting Membership
  • TestDisk is a Great Recovery Tool
  • Adobe Preps Crucial Flash Fix
  • How to Undo an Update in Ubuntu Lucid
  • Brazil Wants To Be The Next India and Open Source Is Their Secret Weapon

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Cool bash scripting trick with arrays
  • Installing ffmpeg-php on an Ubuntu 9.04 LAMP Server
  • Change Run Command Keybinding to Match Gnome-Do
  • Sabayon 5.3 installation guide
  • OpenID authentication with the mod_auth_openid Apache module
  • Upload to Rackspace Cloud Files in a shell script
  • How to recover files from lost+found after fsck in linux
  • How to Enable Multimedia Support (MP3, Mpeg4, Divx, 3gp, avi) in Fedora 13
  • Ubuntu-system-panel - Simple menu and launcher
  • Save Ubuntu space-auto-delete downloaded packages after installation
  • KDE Power Management 101
  • Clone a Hard Drive Using an Ubuntu Live CD
  • Ubuntu won't connect to a Wep-secured network

HP leverages Linux, less known for contribution

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: The 451 Group has published another open source strategy Spotlight report, this time turning our attention to longtime Linux server vendor Hewlett-Packard, which continues to dedicate resources to Linux and other open source software communities.

Not All Open Source is Created Equal

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: When I started to work at Lucid, it was pretty clear to me that I was new to the open source world. So I started by talking to open source luminaries. What I learned from them is that Open Source is a broad term – and not all open source is created equal.

Unix Commands to Try When You're Bored

Filed under
Linux

itworld.com: Not every Unix command sparks with novelty. After all, the OS has now been around for roughly forty years and the spark wears off. But there are some commands that pick up from where the basics run out of steam. Jump on a Linux box and try these out.

Review: PCLinuxOS 2010 Gnome – With Screenshots

Filed under
PCLOS

g33q.co.za: PCLinuxOS, to my mind, has always been a KDE distro. I have used the Gnome edition a little before, mostly with a friend of mine who fiddled around with as many distro’s he could get his hands on and then invited me over to come check out some things for him.

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More in Tux Machines

Early Returns on Firefox Quantum Point to Growth

When we set out to launch Firefox Quantum earlier this year, we knew we had a hugely improved product. It not only felt faster — with a look and feel that tested off the charts — it was measurably faster. Thanks to multiple changes under the hood, we doubled Firefox’s speed while using 30% less memory than Chrome. In less than a month, Firefox Quantum has already been installed by over 170M people around the world. We’re just getting started and early returns are super encouraging. Read more Also: Mozilla Joins Net Neutrality Blackout for ‘Break the Internet’ Day

Linux Foundation News

  • Juniper Networks Reinforces Longstanding Commitment to Open Source by Moving OpenContrail's Codebase to the Linux Foundation
    Juniper Networks (NYSE: JNPR), an industry leader in automated, scalable and secure networks, today further bolstered its support for open standards during its annual NXTWORK user conference, by announcing its intent to move the codebase for OpenContrail™, an open-source network virtualization platform for the cloud, to the Linux Foundation. Juniper first released its Juniper® Contrail® products as open sourced in 2013 and built a vibrant user and developer community around this project. Earlier this year, Juniper expanded the project's governance, creating an even more open, community-led effort to strengthen the project for its next growth phase. Adding OpenContrail's codebase to the Linux Foundation's networking projects will further its objective to grow the use of open source platforms in cloud ecosystems.
  • Hyperledger Hub Supports Open Source Blockchain Development
    Hyperledger is a global blockchain collaboration hub created and hosted by nonprofit The Linux Foundation. Its members are leaders in finance, banking, the Internet of Things, supply chains, manufacturing and technology. Now two years in, Hyperledger compares closely to the Ethereum Enterprise Alliance. Hyperledger is a hub for communities of software developers building blockchain frameworks and platforms. These developers, on the other hand, are a mix of individuals and teams from organizations around the world.
  • Linux Foundation Continues to Emphasize Diversity and Inclusiveness at Events
    This has been a pivotal year for Linux Foundation events. Our largest gatherings, which include Open Source Summit, Embedded Linux Conference, KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, Open Networking Summit, and Cloud Foundry Summit, attracted a combined 25,000 people from 4,500 different organizations globally. Attendance was up 25 percent over 2016. Linux Foundation events are often the only time that developers, maintainers, and other pros who contribute to Linux and other critical open source projects — like AGL, Kubernetes and Hyperledger to name a few — get together in person. Face-to-face meetings are crucial because they speed collaboration, engagement and innovation, improving the sustainability of projects over time.  

today's leftovers

  • Personal Backups with Duplicati on Linux
  • Flatpak'ed Epiphany Browser Becomes More Useful
    Epiphany 3.27.3 was released this morning as the newest release of GNOME's web browser in the road to the GNOME 3.28 stable desktop debut next March.
  • BlackArch 2017.12.11
    Today we released new BlackArch Linux ISOs. For details see the ChangeLog below. Here's the ChangeLog: update blackarch-installer to version 0.6.2 (most important change) included kernel 4.14.4 updated lot's of blackarch tools and packages updated all blackarch tools and packages updated all system packages bugfix release! (see blackarch-installer)
  • Latest Linux Distribution Releases (The Always Up-to-date List)
  • Mining cryptocurrency with Raspberry Pi and Storj
    I'm always looking for ways to map hot technologies to fun, educational classroom use. One of the most interesting, and potentially disruptive, technologies over the past few years is cryptocurrencies. In the early days, one could profitably mine some of the most popular cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin, using a home PC. But as cryptocurrency mining has become more popular, thanks in part to dedicated mining hardware, the algorithms governing it have boosted computational complexity, making home PC mining often impractical, unprofitable, and environmentally unwise.
  • Huawei Collaborated with the Developers of Phoenix OS for the Mate 10’s Easy Projection Feature
    Though the company has virtually no presence in the United States, Huawei is a top 3 smartphone manufacturer in the world. Its subsidiary, Honor, aims to penetrate the Indian market with budget smartphones. Elsewhere, Huawei recently launched the Huawei Mate 10 and Mate 10 Pro in several markets around the world, and rumors have it the device will launch in the United States as well. Apart from the AI features powered by the company’s HiSilicon Kirin 970 SoC, one of the company’s most publicized features is Easy Projection. While not as powerful as Samsung DeX, it brings a desktop OS-like experience without needing to purchase an expensive accessory. Huawei is pushing the feature on its flagship devices, though there’s something about Easy Projection that hasn’t really been mentioned in the press yet. Behind Huawei’s Easy Projection feature is a relatively unheard of player—Beijing Chaozhuo Technology, developers of Phoenix OS.
  • Namaste ! (on the road to Swatantra 2017)
    I’ll have the pleasure to give a talk about GCompris, and another one about Synfig studio. It’s been a long time since I didn’t talk about the latter, but since Konstantin Dmitriev and the Morevna team were not available, I’ll do my best to represent Synfig there.
  • #PeruRumboGSoC2018 – Session 4
    We celebrated yesterday another session of the local challenge 2017-2 “PeruRumboGSoC2018”. It was held at the Centro Cultural Pedro Paulet of FIEE UNI. GTK on C was explained during the fisrt two hours of the morning based on the window* exercises from my repo to handle some widgets such as windows, label and buttons.
  • Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS
    Chrome 63 began rolling out to Android and desktop browsers last week with the usual security fixes and new developer features. On the latter platform, this update introduces Material Design to the Bookmark Manager. Several versions ago, Google began updating various aspects of the browser with Material Design, including History, Downloads, and Settings. Like the Flags page for enabling experiments and in-development features, which Google also revamped in version 63, the Bookmark Manager (Menu > Bookmarks > Bookmark Manager) adopts the standard Materials UI elements. This includes an app bar that houses a large search bar. It adopts the same dark blue theme and includes various Material animations and flourishes.
  • ExpressVPN Unveils Industry’s First Suite of Open-Source Tools to Test for Privacy and Security Leaks
  • New format in GIMP: HGT
    Lately a recurrent contributor to the GIMP project (Massimo Valentini) contributed a patch to support HGT files. From this initial commit, since I found this data quite cool, I improved the support a bit (auto-detection of the variants and special-casing in particular, as well as making an API for scripts). So what is HGT? That’s topography data basically just containing elevation in meters of various landscape (HGT stands for “height“), gathered by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) run by various space agencies (NASA, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, German and Italian space agencies…).
  • What You Need To Know About The Intel Management Engine
    Over the last decade, Intel has been including a tiny little microcontroller inside their CPUs. This microcontroller is connected to everything, and can shuttle data between your hard drive and your network adapter. It’s always on, even when the rest of your computer is off, and with the right software, you can wake it up over a network connection. Parts of this spy chip were included in the silicon at the behest of the NSA. In short, if you were designing a piece of hardware to spy on everyone using an Intel-branded computer, you would come up with something like the Intel Managment Engine. Last week, researchers [Mark Ermolov] and [Maxim Goryachy] presented an exploit at BlackHat Europe allowing for arbitrary code execution on the Intel ME platform. This is only a local attack, one that requires physical access to a machine. The cat is out of the bag, though, and this is the exploit we’ve all been expecting. This is the exploit that forces Intel and OEMs to consider the security implications of the Intel Management Engine. What does this actually mean?

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