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Tuesday, 26 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Firefox market share exceeds 20%, IE at 70%

Filed under
Moz/FF

tgdaily.com: It has been six weeks since Firefox 3 has been released and if we believe market share numbers provided by an ongoing survey of NetApplications, then it appears that Mozilla has had a successful launch with market share gains, especially at the expense of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer.

Also: * Mozilla Fixes Awesomebar...In Next Firefox Version
* ogg support coming soon to mozilla
* Mozilla warns of low-risk DoS vulnerability in Firefox 3

Linux Sea, an online book on Gentoo Linux

Filed under
Gentoo

Sven Vermeulen: With the summer at hand and my daughter on the way, I thought it would be a good idea to put the current work for this (end-user) document online. On my developer page you can find the current draft of Linux Sea, a book on Gentoo Linux.

Roku's Netflix Player: a hands-on review

Filed under
Hardware
  • Roku's Netflix Player: a hands-on review

  • HighPoint Technologies RocketRAID 3120
  • Review: The Sandisk Sansa View
  • India's '$10 laptop' too good to be true

Eight Ways VARs Can Profit From Linux And Open Source

Filed under
OSS
  • Eight Ways VARs Can Profit From Linux And Open Source

  • Microsoft claims heart beats in open source
  • Blizzard Asks Judge to Forbid Open Source
  • The best place to host your open-source project
  • Signature Devices Launches Open Source Game Engine

Launchy Application Launcher Released for Linux

Filed under
Software
  • Launchy Application Launcher Released for Linux

  • GNOME Do vs Launchy

5 Reasons to Choose Debian Linux Over Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Linux

internetling.com: For those rare people who don’t know, Canonical’s Ubuntu distribution is basically Debian Sid (the unstable version) plus a few GUI apps and modifications. Debian is one of the most successful community-based distributions. Here are some reasons to choose Debian over Ubuntu:

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Lighttpd Drupal CMS Clean URL

  • Connecting Ubuntu Linux to a Windows server
  • Bridging VirtualBox 1.6.2 on Ubuntu 8.04.1
  • 100 Vim commands every programmer should know
  • hotplug - Dynamic Hardware Configuration
  • Install KDE 4.1 in Ubuntu, and Make GTK Applications Look Good
  • Reduce Disk Activity In Ubuntu
  • Getting Atheros drivers working in OpenSUSE
  • Get to know the Linux Logical Volume Manager

Is Microsoft getting ready to kill Windows?

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: No, I’m not talking about killing Vista. Microsoft is already burying that living dead operating system as fast it can. I’m talking about killing Windows itself. That’s the conclusion I’ve drawn from David Worthington’s story about Microsoft’s plans for Midori, a next generation operating system.

8 Best E-mail Clients for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: When it comes to picking the right e-mail client, Linux users have tons of choices. I have here a list of 8 of the best free and open source e-mail clients that are available for Linux.

SSD vs. SATA RAID: A performance benchmark

Filed under
Hardware

linux.com: Solid state drives (SSD) have many advantages over traditional spinning-platter hard drives including no noise, low power and heat generation, good resistance to shock, and most importantly, extremely low seek times. To see just how much an SSD might improve performance, I used Bonnie++ to benchmark a contemporary SSD as it might be used in a laptop computer.

Ars reviews Firefox 3.1 alpha 1

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: Mozilla took a big step towards Firefox 3.1 yesterday with the release of the first alpha. It includes important improvements to both the user interface and to Firefox's underlying Gecko rendering engine.

NVIDIA 173.14.12 Linux Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Yesterday KDE 4.1 was released and there are widely known 2D performance problems with the GeForce 8 and 9 series, which are especially exhibited when using the K Desktop Environment. So you think NVIDIA would address this issue in their next driver update? Guess again.

Ex-inmates apply open source to rehabilitation

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

linuxworld.com: Ric Moore and Dennis Gaddy met in prison, and started to discuss how Open Source software and methods could help other inmates to avoid further mistakes and get better chance to start over after their term. In this interview, Ric explains how they are doing it through the NuOAR program and why.

10 Cool Open Source Easter Eggs

Filed under
Software

hehe2.net: It’s easy to forget with all the source compiling, the conspiracy theories, and the OS flaming going on in every corner of the Internet, that there is a fun side of our beloved OS and Open Source applications. I have compiled a list of 10 easter eggs found in Open Source projects.

Help Create the Artwork for openSUSE 11.1

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Now with openSUSE 11.0 out the door, and Alpha 1 of openSUSE 11.1 just released, it’s time to start thinking about the look of openSUSE 11.1! Once again this year the Pixel Pool is open for community members to submit ideas about the 11.1 artwork!

Who will build the open source cloud?

Filed under
Software

Matthew Aslett: I wrote recently about the potential of open source software as a platform for cloud computing. Since then I’ve been involved in a couple of conversations with prospective cloud users that have further highlighted the opportunity for an open source cloud.

Lancelot alpha 2 screenshots

Filed under
KDE

ivan.fomentgroup.org: Vijay Patil asked me to explain the application browsing component, so here it is: At first, you get a panel with two columns - Favourites on the left, and application categories on the right.

Hidden Linux : New Compiz Effects

Filed under
Software

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: I've long been a fan of Compiz desktop candy (see here and here), so when I saw version 0.7.6 had been released I rushed to install it. Here's some comparative shots..

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • South African sister companies praise Linux-based accounting program

  • Firefox 3 uses less RAM than earlier versions
  • Have Your Ammo Ready With OpenOffice
  • Is Open Solaris in Hot Water? -- No, I Don't Think So
  • KDE 4.1 delivers a next-gen desktop Linux experience
  • OpenSUSE 11 Alpha 1 with KDE 4.1
  • Furius ISO Mount - Gui tool to mount ISO & image files in openSUSE
  • OS X, Ubuntu and Other Fun Stuff
  • Launchpad 2.0 Radically Improves Collaboration
  • Are India and China taking over open source?
  • Mozilla Developer News July 29
  • Control, transparency, and customer contributions to open source
  • Plumbers Conference Featured Speakers Announcement

Microsoft, its time to officially rescind the Linux lawsuit threats

Filed under
Microsoft

networkworld.com: At this point in the game, Microsoft should really come clean with a statement that rescinds its Linux/patent/suing threat altogether. The fact is, we are seeing actions by Microsoft that indicate that the "suing Linux users" jig is up.

Also: Microsoft: still a business of threats?

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More in Tux Machines

Linux and Graphics

Security News

  • Security advisories for Monday
  • EU to Give Free Security Audits to Apache HTTP Server and Keepass
    The European Commission announced on Wednesday that its IT engineers would provide a free security audit for the Apache HTTP Server and KeePass projects. The EC selected the two projects following a public survey that took place between June 17 and July 8 and that received 3,282 answers. The survey and security audit are part of the EU-FOSSA (EU-Free and Open Source Software Auditing) project, a test pilot program that received funding of €1 million until the end of the year.
  • What is your browser really doing?
    While Microsoft would prefer you use its Edge browser on Windows 10 as part of its ecosystem, the most popular Windows browser is Google’s Chrome. But there is a downside to Chrome – spying and battery life. It all started when Microsoft recently announced that its Edge browser used less battery power than Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox or Opera on Windows 10 devices. It also measured telemetry – what the Windows 10 device was doing when using different browsers. What it found was that the other browsers had a significantly higher central processing unit (CPU), and graphics processing unit (GPU) overhead when viewing the same Web pages. It also proved that using Edge resulted in 36-53% more battery life when performing the same tasks as the others. Let’s not get into semantics about which search engine — Google or Bing — is better; this was about simple Web browsing, opening new tabs and watching videos. But it started a discussion as to why CPU and GPU usage was far higher. And it relates to spying and ad serving.
  • Is Computer Security Becoming a Hardware Problem?
    In December of 1967 the Silver Bridge collapsed into the Ohio River, killing 46 people. The cause was determined to be a single 2.5 millimeter defect in a single steel bar—some credit the Mothman for the disaster, but to most it was an avoidable engineering failure and a rebuttal to the design philosophy of substituting high-strength non-redundant building materials for lower-strength albeit layered and redundant materials. A partial failure is much better than a complete failure. [...] In 1996, Kocher co-authored the SSL v3.0 protocol, which would become the basis for the TLS standard. TLS is the difference between HTTP and HTTPS and is responsible for much of the security that allows for the modern internet. He argues that, barring some abrupt and unexpected advance in quantum computing or something yet unforeseen, TLS will continue to safeguard the web and do a very good job of it. What he's worried about is hardware: untested linkages in digital bridges.
  • Your Smart Robot Is Coming in Five Years, But It Might Get Hacked and Kill You
    A new report commissioned by the Department of Homeland Security forecasts that autonomous artificially intelligent robots are just five to 10 years away from hitting the mainstream—but there’s a catch. The new breed of smart robots will be eminently hackable. To the point that they might be re-programmed to kill you. The study, published in April, attempted to assess which emerging technology trends are most likely to go mainstream, while simultaneously posing serious “cybersecurity” problems. The good news is that the near future is going to see some rapid, revolutionary changes that could dramatically enhance our lives. The bad news is that the technologies pitched to “become successful and transformative” in the next decade or so are extremely vulnerable to all sorts of back-door, front-door, and side-door compromises.
  • Trump, DNC, RNC Flunk Email Security Test
    At issue is a fairly technical proposed standard called DMARC. Short for “domain-based messaging authentication reporting and conformance,” DMARC tries to solve a problem that has plagued email since its inception: It’s surprisingly difficult for email providers and end users alike to tell whether a given email is real – i.e. that it really was sent by the person or organization identified in the “from:” portion of the missive.
  • NIST Prepares to Ban SMS-Based Two-Factor Authentication
    The US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has released the latest draft version of the Digital Authentication Guideline that contains language hinting at a future ban on SMS-based Two-Factor Authentication (2FA). The Digital Authentication Guideline (DAG) is a set of rules used by software makers to build secure services, and by governments and private agencies to assess the security of their services and software. NIST experts are constantly updating the guideline, in an effort to keep pace with the rapid change in the IT sector.
  • 1.6m Clash of Kings forum accounts 'stolen'
    Details about 1.6 million users on the Clash of Kings online forum have been hacked, claims a breach notification site. The user data from the popular mobile game's discussion forum were allegedly targeted by a hacker on 14 July. Tech site ZDNet has reported the leaked data includes email addresses, IP addresses and usernames.
  • Hacker steals 1.6 million accounts from top mobile game's forum
    [Ed: vBulletin is proprietary software -- the same crap Canonical used for Ubuntu forums]

The saga continues with Slackware 14.2

Slackware is the oldest surviving Linux distribution and has been maintained since its birth by Patrick Volkerding. Slackware has a well deserved reputation for being stable, consistent and conservative. Slackware is released when it is ready, rather than on a set schedule, and fans of the distribution praise its no-frills and no-fuss design. Slackware adheres to a "keep it simple" philosophy similar to Arch Linux, in that the operating system does not do a lot of hand holding or automatic configuration. The user is expected to know what they are doing and the operating system generally stays out of the way. The latest release of Slackware, version 14.2, mostly offers software updates and accompanying hardware support. A few new features offer improved plug-n-play support for removable devices and this release of Slackware ships with the PulseAudio software. PulseAudio has been commonly found in the audio stack of most Linux distributions for several years, but that is a signature of Slackware: adding new features when they are needed, not when they become available. In this case PulseAudio was required as a dependency for another package. Slackware 14.2 is available in 32-bit and 64-bit builds for the x86 architecture. There is also an ARM build. While the main edition of Slackware is available as an installation disc only, there is a live edition of Slackware where we can explore a Slackware-powered desktop environment without installing the distribution. The live edition can be found on the Alien Base website. Both the live edition and the main installation media are approximately 2.6GB in size. For the purposes of this review I will be focusing on the main, installation-only edition. Booting from the install media brings us to a text screen where we are invited to type in any required kernel parameters. We can press the Enter key to take the default settings or wait two minutes for the media to continue booting. A text prompt then offers to let us load an alternative keyboard layout or use the default "US" layout. We are then brought to a text console where a brief blurb offers us tips for setting up disk partitions and swap space. The helpful text says we can create partitions and then run the system installer by typing "setup". Read more

Korora 23 - is it an alternative to Linux Mint?

Cinnamon is a desktop environment that is widely promoted by the Linux Mint team. Linux Mint Cinnamon is their flagship distribution. In its turn, Linux Mint is a leader in the world of Linux distributions, especially for the newbie-oriented part of it. Unfortunately, the recent release of Linux Mint 18 made things worse, and many Linux bloggers wrote about this. There was a comment on my recent post about Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon that asked me to look into the Korora distribution. Read more