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About Tux Machines

Monday, 27 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora 21 Alpha First Impressions: It's Great Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 7:49am
Story Early Adopters Already Hit By Fedora Dropping Old Linux GPU Drivers Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 7:38am
Story Should you dump Android for iPhone 6, iOS 8? No, not at all Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 7:32am
Story My free software will respect users or it will be bullshit Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 7:30am
Story ACPI On ARM: Good Or Bad For Linux? Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 7:08am
Story Towns in Umbria region switch to LibreOffice Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 6:58am
Story Tor Challenge hits it out of the park Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 6:54am
Story SymphonyOS Review, Debian's Desktop, and Fedora 21 Alpha Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 6:12am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 10:01pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 10:00pm

New features of Gwenview in KDE 4.3

Filed under
Software

agateau.wordpress: I have been lagging quite a bit as far as blogging about Gwenview is concerned. In this post I present the most important new features introduced in the KDE 4.3 version of Gwenview which I haven’t blogged about yet.

Will Microsoft promise split the open source movement

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: When we last left “As the .Net Turns,” Richard Stallman was promising that Microsoft would never, ever marry his open source daughter. Now Microsoft has raised the tension in the room by giving that daughter a ring.

Final days: Tectonic to close

Filed under
Web

tectonic.co.za: This is my final post on Tectonic. After more than nine years I have decided that it is time to close the site and move on to new projects.

5 Bash Tips, Part II

Filed under
HowTos

This article is a continuation to my other Bash-related post, 6 Bash Productivity Tips. Since that article gathered many useful comments and I bumped over several more over the net, here are 5 more tips and tricks.

Using iSCSI On Ubuntu 9.04 (Initiator And Target)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Ubuntu 9.04. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling.

coupla quickies

Filed under
Linux

PCLinuxOS and the Parents

Filed under
PCLOS

randomrandy.com: My mother and father are still using PCLinuxOS as I'm typing this post. Now I'm going to answer a few questions that I have been asked by friends and other family members.

Sun's OpenSolaris Review

Filed under
OS

eweekeurope.co.uk: With the new Crossbow network virtualisation system and VirtualBox supported, OpenSolaris wets appetites for upcoming Solaris features.

Gran Canaria Desktop Summit: a Study in Contrasts

Filed under
Software

computerworlduk.com: KDE kindly invited me to give a talk at Akademy 2009, part of the Gran Canaria Desktop Summit running this week.

PCManFM Review - Yet Another Lightweight GTK File Manager

Filed under
Reviews

PCManFM is the default file manager in LXDE, the Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment. Its goal is to offer a fast execution speed, providing in the same time enough functionality for a file manager of its class.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The cloud is a lie

  • Cisco, Red Hat in the Cloud: Friends or Enemies?
  • Could Firefox 3.5 Spark a Web Design Boom?
  • First Linux Action Show released using the new HTML5 Video Tag – The RESULTS!
  • Could I Have Lost My PR3 Because of Firefox 3.5?
  • The Florida Linux Show Helps Establish FLAG
  • Ingres: We're Gaining From The MySQL Meltdown
  • there will be no Nokia devices running Android any time soon
  • Nokia Denies Android Reports
  • SSH, the Cluster is working.
  • No mandatory audio and video codecs in HTML 5
  • Firefox Icon History and Creative Brief – The Big Picture
  • A Comparison of Open Source Search Engines
  • DRM: The Programmers View
  • New Features Of PHP 5.3.0
  • Red Hat KVM virtualization announcement expected at VMworld
  • Will AMD's XvBA Beat Out NVIDIA's VDPAU?
  • My Week in Ubuntu: Twitter-fix
  • How to try Google Android on x86 computers with a LiveCD
  • Introducing the new FSF campaigns manager
  • Identifying pointless .la files for plugins
  • This is the house
  • Light and efficient teeny-weeny text editor
  • PostgreSQL speeds up database
  • Linux Outlaws 100 - Outlaws on the Autobahn

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Record Skype Calls in Linux

  • Create your own yum repository
  • Run a program on one CPU core in Linux
  • Disable Boot Splash in Ubuntu
  • Sending Mail Through Gmail with Perl
  • Get Google Gears Up and Running in Firefox 3.5
  • Asynchronous Mirroring in Unix
  • Getting Loopy with Bash: using for loops

From Microsoft: C# and CLI under the Community Promise

Filed under
Microsoft

tirania.org: First the big news: Microsoft will be applying the Community Promise patent licensing to both C# and the CLI.

Black Duck Report is Meaningless Without Source Code

Filed under
OSS

softwarefreedom.org: Black Duck Software recently published some summary statistics about free and open source software license adoption. Any of these conclusions might be reasonable if the 5% figure was meaningful, but Black Duck has given us no reason to believe it is; if anything, their own statements suggest it isn't.

Interview with Amanda McPherson of LinuxCon in Portland

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I had the pleasure to talk to Amanda McPherson, one of the minds behind LinuxCon, “LinuxCon is a new annual technical conference that will provide an unmatched collaboration and education space for all matters Linux”.

Akademy Awards 2009

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: The Akademy Awards for 2009 have been announced, celebrating the best of KDE contributors. As always the winners are chosen by the winners from the previous year.

A Review of the Smplayer Media Player for Linux and Windows

Filed under
Software

tech-no-media: For me the the best free media player for Windows and Linux is mplayer. It is not only a very fast player, but it also offers a ton of advanced options.

DebConf9 schedule

Filed under
Linux

debconf.org/blog: The schedule for the upcoming DebConf9 is available. Most of it should be set already, but of course there still can be small changes until the conference starts, and honestly, until it ends. more here

KDE and Gnome Formulate Common Goals

Filed under
Software

linux-magazine.com: When KDE chiefs Adriaan de Groot and Sebastian Kuegler, together with Gnome's Dave Neary and Federico Mena met the press, Kuegler explained the idea for a joint desktop conference was born two years ago and is meant to save developers from having to travel to two conferences.

Attempted Break-In on www.centos.org

Filed under
Web

lwn.net: CentOS is reporting that there was a break-in attempt made on the www.centos.org server. Due to an "administrative error", the Xoops content management system was abused to put some content onto the web server.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Blockchain Startups Venture Beyond Bitcoin
    Bitcoin is the most widely-known example of blockchain-based technology, but many of today's startups are looking past the cryptocurrency and towards other, more business-friendly implementations. European blockchain startup incubator Outlier Ventures and Frost & Sullivan have mapped out the blockchain startup landscape, identifying several key areas of activity. It outlines possible paths to success following a busy year for blockchain investments.
  • Another Sandy Bridge Era Motherboard Now Supported By Coreboot
    The Sapphire Pure Platinum H61 is the latest motherboard to be supported by mainline Coreboot for replacing the board's proprietary BIOS.
  • OSI Welcomes the Journal of Open Source Software as Affiliate Member
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), a global non-profit organization formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, announced that the Journal Of Open Source Software (JOSS), a peer-reviewed journal for open source research software packages, is now an OSI affiliate member.
  • Open source project uses Docker for serverless computing
    Serverless computing has fast become a staple presence on major clouds, from Amazon to Azure. It’s also inspiring open source projects designed to make the concept of functions as a service useful to individual developers. The latest of these projects, called simply Functions as a Service (FaaS) by developer and Linux User contributor Alex Ellis, uses Docker and its native Swarm cluster management technology to package any process as a function available through a web API.
  • PyCharm 2017.1, MicroStrategy 2017.1, Next.js 2.0, and Ubuntu 17.04 final beta released — SD Times news digest: March 27, 2017
  • Open source JavaScript, Node.js devs get NPM Orgs for free
    The SaaS-based tool, which features capabilities like role-based access control, semantic versioning, and package discovery, now can be used on public code on the NPM registry, NPM Inc. said on Wednesday. Developers can transition between solo projects, public group projects, and commercial projects, and users with private registries can use Orgs to combine code from public and private packages into a single project.
  • Slaying Monoliths at Netflix with Node.js
    The growing number of Netflix subscribers -- nearing 85 million at the time of this Node.js Interactive talk -- has generated a number of scaling challenges for the company. In his talk, Yunong Xiao, Principal Software Engineer at Netflix, describes these challenges and explains how the company went from delivering content to a global audience on an ever-growing number of platforms, to supporting all modern browsers, gaming consoles, smart TVs, and beyond. He also looks at how this led to radically modifying their delivery framework to make it more flexible and resilient.
  • Mudlet, the open source MUD client has a new major stable build available
    I don't know how many of you play MUDs, but Mudlet, an open source cross-platform MUD client has hit version 3.0.

today's howtos

Minimal Linux Live

Minimal Linux Live is, as the name suggests, a very minimal Linux distribution which can be run live from a CD, DVD or USB thumb drive. One of the things which set Minimal Linux Live (MLL) apart from other distributions is that, while the distribution is available through a 7MB ISO file download, the project is designed to be built from source code using a shell script. The idea is that we can download scripts that will build MLL on an existing Linux distribution. Assuming we have the proper compiler tools on our current distribution, simply running a single shell script and waiting a while will produce a bootable ISO featuring the MLL operating system. Yet another option the MLL project gives us is running the distribution inside a web browser using a JavaScript virtual machine. The browser-based virtual machine running MLL can be found on the project's website, under the Emulator tab. This gives us a chance to try out the operating system in our web browser without installing or building anything. I decided to try the MLL build process to see if it would work and how long it would take if everything went smoothly. I also wanted to find out just how much functionality such a small distribution could offer. The project's documentation mostly covers building MLL on Ubuntu and Linux Mint and so I decided to build MLL on a copy of Ubuntu 16.04 I had running in a virtual machine. The steps to build MLL are fairly straight forward. On Ubuntu, we first install six packages to make sure we have all the required dependencies. Then we download an archive containing MLL's build scripts. Then we unpack the archive and run the build script. We just need to type four commands in Ubuntu's virtual terminal to kick-start the build process. Read more

GCC Compiler Tests At A Variety Of Optimization Levels Using Clear Linux

For those curious about the impact of GCC compiler optimization levels, a variety of benchmarks were carried out using GCC 6.3 on Intel's Clear Linux platform. Read more Also: LLVM 4.0.1 Planning, Aiming For Better Stable Releases