Recovering Data with Foremost

Filed under
HowTos

Sometimes you can craftily restore a damaged master boot record after an all night hack-a-thon. With proper care, restoration software, and carefully maintained backups it usually isn't necessary to read data raw off a partition.

But even with the best recovery systems in place accidents can still happen. When you've written over the MBR of your system after deleting it during a 4AM coding marathon more drastic measures than a backup restore are called for. Enter Foremost.

Installing Spamassassin

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HowTos

Spam is one of the biggest problems of the internet and just about everybody has written Bill Gates. I did not want to be one of those guys who blogs and never wrote about spam, one of the most loved subjects of bloggers. Here are some methods to avoid spam.

Opinion: XP faster than Linux? Not so fast!

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OS

In a recent so-called Desktop Linux versus Windows XP shootout, writer George Ou declares that "Microsoft handily beat the open source platform." The basis for this judgment? "OS boot time and application load times" on two different PCs. Oh, dear. This isn't right at all.

Burning DVDs on Debian for Newbies

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HowTos

DVD writers have become so common these days that there is hardly any difference between the price of a CD-writer drive and a DVD-writer drive. Below are a few tips for newbies on how to burn DVDs on a Debian box using the command line

Linux Kernel Socket Data Buffering Denial of Service

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Security

A vulnerability has been reported in the Linux Kernel, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

Enterprise Unix Roundup: Eyeing the Horizon

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Misc

Where, oh where, did the past year go? It was a year that had us on the edge of our seats in enterprise Unix-land. It was a good year to be a pundit, and it was an even better year to be an open source or Linux vendor, as the latest wave of zeitgeist rolled in. Here's a brief overview of what developments of 2005 will have the most impact on enterprise Unix in 2006.

Demystifying Security Enhanced Linux

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Linux

In this paper I will try to explain the philosophy behind the Security Enhanced Linux (SE Linux). I will however try to explain the concept with an example but to keep the length readable I will restrain myself to go into much of implementation details for e.g. commands and similar stuff.

n/a

An introduction to bash completion: part 1

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HowTos

One of the nicest facilities of the modern shell is the built in "completion" support. These facilities allow you to complete commands and their arguments easily. Read on for a brief introduction to adding your own command completions.

Belenix - A Live CD based on Open Solaris

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Reviews

I had always wanted to try out Solaris OS ever since Sun released its code under an open licence and renamed it as Open Solaris. But even though open solaris had its own website, downloading a binary image was an entirely different matter and was not an easy proposition. So when a few brilliant Indians Smile at the Bangalore India Engineering Center of Sun Microsystems released a live CD called Belenix based on Open Solaris, I decided to give it a spin.

MyLinux dies after only 7 Issues

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Linux

After only seven monthly issues -- from June 2005 to December 2005 -- the only Romanian Linux magazine -- MyLINUX (MyL in short) announced it will not appear any more!

Security: Forensic Tools in Court

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Misc

An interesting question comes to mind when you use as many open source forensic and security tools as I do — if I ever go to court over this case, will my tools be considered valid?

NVIDIA 1.0-8178 Display Drivers Benchmarked

Filed under
Software

The driver launch today is only minor, hence its version, but is there any performance gains or losses to be attributed to the latest set of drivers? We have wrapped up our testing and are here to share our results today. Below are NVIDIA's official notes regarding the 1.0-8178 drivers for Linux x86 and x86_64.

Also: id Quake 4 Quakemas 2005 Screenshots

Mozilla Launches Firefox Marketing Blitz

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Moz/FF

Joy to the world, the browser has come.

The Mountain View, Calif.-based organization launched its first official marketing campaign ever on Wednesday, an initiative that will ask existing Firefox users to make short films about their experiences using the software to convince other people to try it.

After Google, Microsoft is RUMORED to have bought Opera!

Filed under
Microsoft

CoolTechZone.com, a tech magazine has this insider report claiming that the world’s largest software company Microsoft has acquired Opera Software.

Also: Gates' Microsoft And Google Settle Employee Row

Windows of opportunity for Nepali computing

Filed under
OS

For the first time non-English speaking Nepalis who were excluded can now use the computer not just for word processing but for database, spreadsheets, layout, inernet and email also. And they have two alternatives to choose from: Windows XP or Linux.

Sun to make processor specs open source

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Hardware

AFTER opening up the source code of its Solaris operating system and Solaris Enterprise System, Sun Microsystems Inc said it will publish the full specifications of the design of its UltraSparc T1 processor under an open source licence around March next year.

New Linux Nvidia drivers: v1.0-8178

Filed under
Software

Linux Display Driver - IA32 & AMD64/EM64T

Version: 1.0-8178
Operating System: Linux
Release Date: December 22, 2005

Top Distros of 2005

Filed under
Linux
-s

2005 has been an exciting year on the Linux distribution front. For some of us, every year is an exciting year in Linux, but 2005 was undoubtedly a banner year for open source and Linux to be sure. We've seen a lot of technological progress as well as some philosophical, personnel, and directional changes. I think it's only fitting to look at some of Tuxmachines' Top Distro Picks of 2005.

Nessus 3.0: The End of the Age of Open-Source Innocence?

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OSS

The recent licensing changes affect a broad spectrum of users, including corporations, the open-source community, and even businesses using services that use Nessus. So what exactly does this mean for open source? Is it the end of the age of innocence? What options do interested parties have going forward?

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