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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Cookie Lickers, Headless Chickens & Other Open Source Troublemakers Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:43pm
Story Yelp cooks up an open-source PaaSTA dish for developers Rianne Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:38pm
Story Digital Migration: After 20 years with Windows, I am moving to Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:36pm
Story Databases Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:29pm
Story An open source fan boy shares his story Rianne Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:27pm
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:25pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:18pm
Story openSUSE 13.1 Reaches End of Life on January 5, 2016, Update to openSUSE Leap 42.1 Rianne Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:17pm
Story Is That Ubuntu Touch or Ubuntu Desktop? The Answer Is Both Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:16pm
Story Plasma 5 — a review Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:02pm

Browser Feature War: IE9 RC1 vs. Firefox 4 vs. Chrome 9

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF

pcworld.com: The browser wars are back with a vengeance. It's a browser battle for the ages. But watch out Chrome and Firefox, the Borg (that was Microsoft's pet name in the 90's, kids) are back and this time resistance really is futile. Let's take a look.

Why You Need to Have a Linux LiveCD

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: As a longtime fan of Linux, I'm a big believer that most business users would benefit greatly by dumping Windows and switching over to the open source operating system instead. It's stable, it's reliable and it's highly secure, among many other advantages.

2011 Favorite Desktop

LibreOffice Sees First Update Already

Filed under
LibO

ostatic.com: Today The Document Foundation announced the release candidate to LibreOffice 3.3.1. This is the first in what will undoubtedly become a series of ever-improving code.

Is Debian Dying?

Filed under
Linux

linux-magazine.com: Steven J. Vaughan-Nicholls created a stir this week when he marked the release of Debian 6.0 by wondering if the distribution was still relevant. He was refuted by Joe Brockmeier, but the noticeable lack of hard facts disturbed me, so I decided to see if I could find any indicators of Debian's health on-line.

How to Theme Up Lubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: Lubuntu is best known as a lightweight and speedy Linux distro, but when it comes to beauty and elegant, it is still lacking. Its default theme is rather plain and boring and its library of themes is limited too. Luckily, there are tons of beautiful themes out there that you can use.

Hitchhiker's Guide to Linux Forum Galaxy!

Filed under
Linux

linuxmigrante.blogspot: As a relatively new migrant to Tuxland, I've come to learn that Linux forums are a rich source of advice, useful information and help. I decided to put up a small Linux forum guide for newbies in an attempt to explain some important cultural differences that may affect a new user's success rate when asking for help on a Linux Forum.

Meet Fedora Ambassador Larry Cafiero

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

linux-magazine.com: This week we look at the Fedora Ambassador Program through the eyes and experience of Fedora Ambassador, Larry Cafiero.

Review: Debian 6 "Squeeze"

Filed under
Linux

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: After a wait of 2 years, Debian 6 "Squeeze" has finally been released! Yay! It's now officially termed "stable".

Firefox 4 knows about:me (and you)

Filed under
Moz/FF

internetnews.com: I'm a big fan of data analytics which is why back in 2009 I was excited about a new potential Firefox feature called about:me.

Debian's Killer Feature: Flexibility

Filed under
Linux

anarchic-order.blogspot: Debian has a reputation in the world of Linux distributions as, well, "stodgy". Debian Stable is pointed to as being out of date, stale, boring. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Replacing my File/Print Server w/ Pogoplug

Filed under
Hardware

ericsbinaryworld.com: PogoPlug is meant to be used to essentially create your own dropbox. That’s pretty cool, but I don’t care. I just wanted a cheap computer with low wattage.

No release candidate for Ubuntu 11.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • No release candidate for Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Release Schedule Updated

HP Pretends Linux Voids Netbook Hardware Warranty

Filed under
Linux

consumerist.com: Installing a different operating system on a computer does not change its hardware. This is a simple enough concept...unless you work in technical support for HP.

Mixed signals on the future of MeeGo Linux for netbooks

Filed under
Linux

liliputing.com: Nokia announced a partnership with Microsoft this morning to bring Windows Phone 7 to Nokia smartphones. Symbian and MeeGo will continue to ship on devices until WP7 is ready to go, but Symbian isn’t long for this world. So what about MeeGo?

Running PC Pro on Ubuntu: the verdict

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcpro.co.uk: Yesterday, something remarkable happened. Our entire editorial team migrated to Ubuntu overnight and – by and large – it was business as usual. The website ran as normal, magazine copy was still written, we (just about) fulfilled our day jobs.

KDE 4.6 review

Filed under
Reviews

An fun to read review of KDE 4.6.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • ‘Suspended Sentence’ becomes first post-release ARB app to land in Ubuntu
  • Removal of hal improves boot time
  • Open Source Alternatives to Google
  • Celebrating Document Freedom Day 2011
  • 'UK government committed to open source'
  • AllJoyn Open Source
  • Utils, Utils, Utils…
  • KDE 4.6 Review Follow-Up: A Feature I Forgot to Mention
  • Version 3.0 of Cuba's Nova Linux Released
  • Best practices when sponsoring Debian packages
  • Digikam – Photo Manager for Linux, Mac and Windows
  • Qatar Exchange Turns to Red Hat
  • Non-free Software Provide Multiple Points of Failure
  • LSE and Canada's TMX to merge, Share Linux system
  • Red Hat Close To Resistance
  • Open source software gains ground in higher education
  • Know Thy Machine...
  • Dotzler: internet explorer nine - why microsoft still sucks
  • Kannasaver 1.2 for KDE 4 Released
  • FR: Ruling cancels public procurement tender that excluded open source software
  • FLOSS Weekly 152: FOSDEM
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 389
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 3 Episode 3

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install Oxygen Mouse Cursor Theme On Ubuntu 10.10
  • Take screenshots of your Android phone from Windows or Linux
  • SysRQ in Linux and Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu keyboard layout options Swap Esc and Caps Lock keys
  • Batch Image Processing the Easy Way with Phatch
  • Un-Bricking Linux Plug Computers
  • 3 Amazing Little Firefox Tweaks
  • Kindle Books on Linux
  • Drawing Cartoons In Five Easy Steps

How not to piss off a kernel subsystem maintainer - part 5

Filed under
Linux

kroah.com: Heck, It's not like I haven't said all of this before, but it sure seems like no one learns from the past, or reads the documentation that we write for how to actually submit a patch for the kernel. It's not like it's a secret or something...

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more