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Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Fedora Rawhide nightly live spins available

Filed under
Linux
Software

Adam Williamson reports that the Fedora project is now producing automated nightly live builds of Rawhide, its development branch - now you can test the freshest Rawhide without having to install it at all.

SimplyMEPIS Linux 8.0

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Certain distributions tend to get more press than others. SimplyMEPIS isn’t one. It’s a shame though as SimpyMEPIS has quite a bit to offer the desktop Linux user as you’ll find out in this review.

Review: Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

v3.co.uk: The most popular of the free Linux distros, the 10th and latest release of Ubuntu Linux (9.04, also known as Jaunty Jackalope) is available for both servers and desktops.

Program Which Automatically Compiles and Install The Latest Kernel in Ubuntu / Debian: KernelCheck

Filed under
Ubuntu

KernelCheck is a a program that automatically compiles and installs the latest Kernel for Debian based Linux distributions (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, etc.). The program also allows for automatic installation of proprietary video drivers via EnvyNG.

10 habits of superstitious users

Filed under
Misc

blogs.techrepublic.com: For some users, the computer is unfathomable - leading them to make bizarre assumptions about technology and the effect of their own actions. Here are a few irrational beliefs such users develop.

Red Hat HornetQ debuts for open source messaging

Filed under
Software

blog.internetnews.com: Red Hat today officially launched a new open source messaging system called HornetQ. The new effort has its roots in the JBoss Messaging platform, that has been around since at least 2006.

The Ubuntu Welfare Program

Filed under
Ubuntu

daniweb.com/blogs: Since its inception in 2004, Ubuntu has been the beneficiary in what seems like a bottomless money pit for South African entrepreneur, Mark Shuttleworth via his commercial support and development venture, Canonical. How long can anyone keep pumping money into a project that might not ever turn a profit?

Reading “The Art of Community”

Filed under
OSS

randomink.org: Jono has been active and visible in various communities and, I expected his enthusiasm to reflect in the writing. The book is a good one and, definitely worth a read.

Early Ubuntu 9.10, OpenSuSE 11.2, Mandriva 2010 Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Last week we provided benchmarks of Ubuntu 9.10 Alpha 4, but Ubuntu is not the only Linux distribution preparing for a major update in the coming months. Also released in the past few days were OpenSuSE 11.2 Milestone 6 and Mandriva Linux 2010.0 Beta 1. To see how these three popular distributions compare, we set out to do our usual Linux benchmarking dance.

The APT2 project

Filed under
Software

juliank.wordpress: I just started working on a replacement for APT written in Vala and called APT2 (I know, the name could be better). The main idea behind the project is to create a library for working with Debian repositories and packages, and on top of this library a few applications.

Why Has Nokia's Netbook Got Windows, Not Linux?

eweekeurope.co.uk: We knew Nokia had a netbook up its sleeve, but why go with Microsoft Windows? Because Nokia's user interface skills aren't good enough, and Linux would delay it, says Peter Judge

Google Chrome OS: Desktop Linux's Last Chance

Filed under
OS
Google

earthweb.com: “The year of Linux” – For how many years now have we come across this headline, usually prefaced by a bygone year? It must be for at least ten years. Is there any hope that Linux can actually make significant gains and become a credible alternative to Windows and Mac OS X?

Linux- 5 steps to a wider adoption

Filed under
Linux

sinaisix.blogspot: Linux is the world's best alternative to Microsoft Windows. It has everything that Windows has always dreamed of having. However, it is a big wonder why after being around for close to 20 years, Linux still has less than 5% of the desktop market share.

Introducing Guitarix

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: Guitarix is a monaural amplifier designed for creating the distorted sounds typical of thrash, heavy metal, blues, and other rock guitar styles. In fact, Guitarix is capable of much more than distortion sounds. In this article I'll remove the software speaker grill and pull out the virtual chassis to take a closer look at the sonic possibilities of this "simple mono amplifier".

Novell vs. Red Hat: 9 Days to Watch

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: That nine-day period will provide a healthy reality check for the Linux market — and it may also reveal how open source initiatives are shaping up across the IT channel. Here’s why.

An Open Letter to Michael Dell: Why I have no choice but return my Ubuntu Inspiron Mini 10

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I bought an Inspiron Mini 10. I have no choice but return it. And now I can’t stop wondering: how could Michael Dell get it just so wrong?

Rethinking Empathy in Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: The Gnome application Empathy was set to become the default instant-messaging client in Ubuntu 9.10 upon its release October, replacing Pidgin. But Ubuntu developers have been reconsidering that decision in the last few days.

Top 7 Xfce Applications

Filed under
Reviews

Over the years, Xfce gained a reputation of being a lightweight alternative for the two major desktop environments on Linux, KDE and GNOME. In this article I will overview 7 essential applications for the Xfce desktop environment, including screenshots, most popular features, strong and weak points.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 317

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Puppy Linux 4.2.1
  • News: KDE becomes default in openSUSE, Novell promotes appliance building tool, Mandriva switches to Plymouth, Sabayon starts testing 5.0, interview with kernel hacker Greg Kroah-Hartman
  • Released last week: CentOS 4.8
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 12 Alpha, FreeBSD 8.0-BETA3
  • Site news: Distribution pages get new layout
  • New additions: NuTyX GNU/Linux
  • New distributions: ÆrieBSD, Gordus GNU/Linux, juntaDados, VENENUX GNU/Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Is it time you swapped Ubuntu for Fedora?

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

techradar.com: The release of Fedora 11 comes hot on the heels of Ubuntu's latest offering. Both products are wedded to a six monthly release cycle that follows the biannual release of the Gnome desktop, and they both package the same version – 2.26. They also bundle the same versions of Xfce (4.6), the X server (1.6) and KDE (4.2).

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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.