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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story AMD Quietly Releases Catalyst 14.8 Linux Driver Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 6:45pm
Story Btrfs Changes Rejected For The Linux 3.17 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 6:36pm
Story HTC is bringing its in-house apps to the rest of Android Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 6:16pm
Story Will Linux ever be able to give consumers what they want? Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 6:09pm
Story 6 Secrets Every Windows User Should Know About Linux Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 5:55pm
Story Linux-driven service robot wants to deliver your towels Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 5:52pm
Story Reiser4 Now Available For Linux 3.15 Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 4:46pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 4:28pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 4:27pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 4:26pm

Gnome 3.0 General Sociological Research

Filed under
Software

gnome.org: First of all we would like to thank the 1000+ people that took the survey in the margin of one week and thus contributed for a better gnome.

Comparing KDE 3.5.10 and KDE 4.2.2 memory usage

Filed under
KDE

usalug-org.blogspot: Recently I have been checking out the memory usage of various window managers and desktop environments, concluding with a study of KDE.

Dell: Most Linux users don't really need the latest version

Filed under
Linux

betanews.com: The new Mini 10v netbook that Dell launched last week will get more capabilities over the year ahead, including what the company is calling "wireless improvements." However, although "Linux enthusiasts" might wish otherwise, an upgrade from the currently supported Ubuntu Linux 8.04.

15+ programs you don't have to miss when you switch to Linux

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: Two years ago, the small business where I work would never have considered selling Linux systems. Times have changed. Many of their preferred Windows programs are also available for Linux.

In search of the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

itpro.co.uk: KDE and GNOME are the mainstream desktop environments for GNU/Linux. There are lightweight options that use fewer resources, such as Xfce or Fluxbox, but new users are more likely to encounter KDE or GNOME.

KDE4: The Future of the X Desktop?

Filed under
KDE

connectedinternet.co.uk: The biggest issue keeping the X desktop from feeling like a polished system is the presence of multiple desktop environments leads to applications being developed using a wide variety of GUI toolkits.

What Does a Linux Support Contract Buy?

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Companies that traffic in free open source software don't make their money selling licenses. They make it by selling support. What's that really worth? What does a company get for support fees?

The State Of The Wayland Display Server

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Last year the Wayland Display Server project was started and aims to provide a mini display server that is designed around the latest X/kernel technologies like the Graphics Execution Manager and kernel mode-setting.

Open Source Developer Intends To Block Belgian Government From Using His Technology

Filed under
OSS

techcrunch.com: Open source developer Bruno Lowagie is about to set a remarkable precedent in the F/OSS world by restricting any government body in his and my home country, Belgium, to use any product that makes use of technology originally developed by him.

9 Ways to Make Linux More Secure

Filed under
Linux

nixtutor.com: The Linux operating system has already been proven to be very reliable and secure. It is often the most popular operating system found on web servers largely accredited to its track record in security, but can it be improved?

Boycott Novell attacks itself to get attention

Filed under
Web

adterrasperaspera.com: Am I the only one out there who thinks this is an admission that Boycott Novell did it to themselves to get attention? Several blogs out there have already started talking about it so it seems to have worked.

8 Essential OpenOffice Extensions

Filed under
OOo

junauza.com: OpenOffice is already a complete desktop office suite that is at par in terms of features with the proprietary Microsoft Office. However, its functionality can still be improved by utilizing useful extensions that are easily available.

Review: gNewSense Version 2.2

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: The gNewSense project today announced version 2.2 of its free GNU/Linux distribution. This is the second point update to the release codenamed 'deltah'. We're especially excited to see that, as a result of the cooperation between SGI and the FSF to relicense the core 3D library code as free software, today's release re-introduces GLX.

The Merits of Control-Alt-Backspace, or Geeks vs. Reality

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: For the release of Jaunty, the Ubuntu developers decided to disable the control-alt-backspace shortcut for killing the graphical X session. This move prompted a lot of complaining from advanced users.

Wireless Linux group chalks out ambitious plans

Filed under
Linux

reuters.com: Open-source wireless Linux foundation LiMo aims to grow its share of the mobile phone operating system market, dominated by Nokia, by adding about 10 members and launching 20 new models this year.

Why are we pinning Linux desktop hopes on netbooks

Filed under
Linux

infoworld.com: Consumers already have a user experience in mind when using a device focused on personal computing tasks. That experience is largely Microsoft Windows-based.

Ubuntu - Embed a Terminal into Your Desktop using Compiz [Howto]

Filed under
Ubuntu

I guess you could use a screenlet or something similar to embed a terminal into your desktop, but I want to have it transparent, with no titlebar or border and basically to look like my wallpaper has a terminal. For that, i used Compiz and this is what it looks like:

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.8 released

  • I Can Name That Distro in Two Notes
  • Flash isn't going open source, but it may already be more open than Moonlight
  • State IT Agency to host FOSS vendor day
  • Linux Netbooks: What's the Secret Sauce for Sales?
  • How the Debian OpenSSL bug almost spawned a disaster
  • Microsoft’s Linux Rivals Try to Head Off Acrimony
  • Comux 010101
  • The Future Of Gnome DE Looks Promising
  • How Old is that Data on the Hard Drive?
  • The Battle for ODF Interoperability
  • The best Linux disk cloning software - Mephisto Backup 1.5
  • What kept me from sticking to Ubuntu as a desktop solution
  • redhat.com - 2nd round
  • World’s Smallest Computer Runs on Ubuntu
  • ODF Alliance Finds Serious Shortcomings Office 2007 SP2 ODF
  • Video: Open source government
  • Leading Voices - Michael Tiemann, VP of Open Source Affairs at Red Hat
  • Drupal is a Webware 100 winner for the third year in a row
  • about:mozilla 05/19

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Convert Any Video File Format Under Linux

  • Fix Slow Or Hanging Thunderbird Email Client
  • How to install Chromium (Google Chome) on Gentoo Linux
  • Gedit won't save to SSHFS mount, cured
  • Get to know Linux: Removing files
  • How to setup and use YUM on Fedora Linux
  • How to get ath5k working on Jaunty
  • Jargon Jam - Repo
  • Comandline 101: Aliases for Common Commands
  • Debian Lenny 5.0.1 PXE initrd update

The KDE 4.3 beta: KDE Returns to Incremental Releases

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: With the release of the KDE 4.3 beta, the project is returning to incremental releases, and concentrating on customization and ease of use on the desktop, the panel, and system settings.

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Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

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