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Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Let’s talk about Python 3.0

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Software I really like Python. It’s my language of choice for new projects, my language of choice for hacking up quick things to play with and the language I get to work with every day at my job. Python fits my brain in ways that no other programming language ever has. But

Linus Torvalds: Life is good again...

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...because it looks like we figured out what the suspend/resume problem was. And as suspected, the actual resource code had nothing what-so-ever to do with it, and was apparently just a trigger for timing.

7 Best Free/Open-source Image Viewers for Linux

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Software An image viewer (also known as image browser) is a desktop application that can quickly display or handle stored graphical images in different graphics file formats. It can render images according to properties of the display such as display resolution, color depth, and color profile. Other image viewers have advanced features like editing and web publishing.

Linux vs. Binary Blobs, or, Ideology vs. Reality

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Linux As Bruce Byfield notes in a recent essay, there’s been a bit of discussion lately about the presence of ‘binary blobs‘ in the Linux kernel. But the larger question, perhaps, is whether or not software freedom really matters so much to mainstream Linux users in the first place.

The Macbook Experiment: Fedora 10 for Two Days After trying Ubuntu 8.10 for two days on my Macbook, which proved to be a success, I now take Fedora 10 for a spin. Read on to see how my two days experience with this Linux distro was like.

today's leftovers

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  • An Overview Of Recent KDE 4 Development

  • Implications of startups choosing open source
  • WINE 1.1.10 Brings Improved 64-Bit Support
  • We need solutions to industry 'bugs,' not critics
  • KDE Videocast Episode 4, December 6
  • Command not found
  • Stable kernel
  • Second Firefox 3.1 beta under starters order
  • the linux desktop’s change problem
  • Top of the world, ma! (Monitoring software)
  • Ding Dong the Emeralds Back Compiz
  • The Status of PCLinuxOS 2008/2009
  • Richard Stallman supports Creative Commons. Do you?
  • Combined KDE and Gnome developers meeting
  • Is there really a ‘relationship’ between Linux and Windows?
  • Open source and circling the drain
  • Music Studio Software: Buzztard
  • New version 5.2.7 of PHP has improved stability and security
  • Radeon Driver Gets Tear-Free X-Video
  • Teaching Thunderbird to Tango
  • Post 2.0.0 Git Vaults, Amarok Urls and Bookmarks

some howtos:

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  • 3 ways to keep safe your files

  • Tar Extract a Single File(s) From a Large Tarball
  • Getting Clock to Display Temp, Weather & Multiple Timezone in Ubuntu
  • Installing Fedora 10 Step by step
  • Dynamic Theming in Drupal 6 - Part 2
  • Keeping an eye on your Web proxy usage with Squid Graph
  • Start using crontab for automation

Reasons to Switch from OS X or Windows to Ubuntu

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Ubuntu All too often, popular tech-blogs engage in the old and tired debate about why you should switch to OS X or stay with Windows. The other alternative, the one that both Microsoft and Apple are afraid to mention, is GNU/Linux.

Songbird 1.0

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linuxowns.wordpress: After a long period of beta versions, Songbird 1.0 is out. The big question is: is it any good? Let’s find out.

Ilumina TV Runs On Ubuntu

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Ubuntu The Ilumina's basic component is its 32-inch LCD TV panel. Inside it are computer parts that run a scaled-down version of Ubuntu Linux operating system.

First Look: Fedora 10 OS

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Redmond Channel Partner: Fedora 10, a Linux-based desktop operating system sponsored by Red Hat, was released late last month by the Fedora Project. This version of the open source OS, code-named "Cambridge," has some new features that I was eager to try. I used the 700-MB live CD for installation and testing.

KDE 4.2 beta 1 on Gentoo

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KDE KDE 4.2 is set for release on January 27th. Eager to see what is new and improved, I installed beta 1 on my Gentoo box. This is a snapshot of the current development tree that will eventually be released as KDE 4.2.

Also: Review - KDE 4 - Linux GUI interface - SUCKS

Michael Robertson Loses Motion in Dispute over Linspire's Missing Assets

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kevincarmony.blogspot: I have some good news to report to the 100 some-odd shareholders who remain in the dark about Linspire's missing cash and assets...

Happy metrics on Mandriva community growth

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Vincent Danen posted some numbers about the decline of posts to Mandriva's mailing lists. However, this is not evidence of a decline in the community - it simply means they all moved elsewhere. Specifically, to the forums.

The Perfect Desktop - Fedora 10 (GNOME)

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This tutorial shows how you can set up a Fedora 10 desktop (GNOME) that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

Loving KDE 4.2

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jtechinda.blogspot: Now that KDE 4.2 beta1 packages are finally done we can start using KDE 4.2! I think the changes are absolutely great. Nothing too radical, but the KDE team packed in a lot of features everywhere and it really adds up!

VMGL brings 3-D effects to VMs

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Software VMGL is a little-known application written as part of Google's Summer of Code 2006 program that lets OpenGL apps running inside a virtual machine take advantage of the graphics hardware acceleration on the host.

10 Great Thunderbird Addons You Must-have

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Moz/FF More than a year back, Aibek has written a great list of 35 must-have thunderbird addons. Since then, a lot of great addons have been created and some of the older addons have also evolved to become a better one.

10 Reasons To Choose Linux in a Bad Economy

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Linux Whether the ailing economy is real or imagined, you might be looking for ways to shed some pounds off your bloated IT budget. You should seriously consider Linux and Open Source software to put your 2009 financial appetite on a diet. Here are 10 reasons.

Sad metrics on Mandriva community decline

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MDV I’ve been saying it for a while, but never really put hard evidence to it. Our community has declined and by the numbers I’ll produce, I’m going to say it declined a lot.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Applications 16.12 Software Suite Lands December 15 for KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS

KDE Plasma's KDE Applications 16.08 software suite series will receive just one more point release, namely KDE Applications 16.08.3, which lands November 10, so it's time for the next major branch. Read more

Android Leftovers

Security News

  • How your DVR was hijacked to help epic cyberattack
    Technology experts warned for years that the millions of Internet-connected "smart" devices we use every day are weak, easily hijacked and could be turned against us. The massive siege on Dyn, a New Hampshire-based company that monitors and routes Internet traffic, shows those ominous predictions are now a reality. An unknown attacker intermittently knocked many popular websites offline for hours Friday, from Amazon to Twitter and Netflix to Etsy. How the breach occurred is a cautionary tale of the how the rush to make humdrum devices “smart” while sometimes leaving out crucial security can have major consequences.
  • Find Out If One of Your Devices Helped Break the Internet
    Security experts have been warning for years that the growing number of unsecured Internet of Things devices would bring a wave of unprecedented and catastrophic cyber attacks. Just last month, a hacker publicly released malware code used in a record-breaking attack that hijacked 1.5 million internet-connected security cameras, refrigerators, and other so-called “smart” devices that were using default usernames and passwords. On Friday, the shit finally hit the fan.
  • Once more, with passion: Fingerprints suck as passwords
    Fingerprints aren’t authentication. Fingerprints are identity. They are usernames. Fingerprints are something public, which is why it should really bother nobody with a sense of security that the FBI used them to unlock seized phones. You’re literally leaving your fingerprints on every object you touch. That makes for an abysmally awful authentication token.
  • Strengthen cyber-security with Linux
    Using open source software is a viable and proven method of combatting cyber-crime It’s encouraging to read that the government understands the seriousness of the loss of $81 million dollars via the hacking of Bangladesh Bank, and that a cyber-security agency is going to be formed to prevent further disasters. Currently, information security in each government department is up to the internal IT staff of that department.
  • Canonical announces live kernel patching for Ubuntu
    Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, has announced that it will provide a live kernel patching services for version 16.04 which was released in April.
  • Everything you know about security is wrong
    If I asked everyone to tell me what security is, what do you do about it, and why you do it. I wouldn't get two answers that were the same. I probably wouldn't even get two that are similar. Why is this? After recording Episode 9 of the Open Source Security Podcast I co-host, I started thinking about measuring a lot. It came up in the podcast in the context of bug bounties, which get exactly what they measure. But do they measure the right things? I don't know the answer, nor does it really matter. It's just important to keep this in mind as in any system, you will get exactly what you measure. [...] If you have 2000 employees, 200 systems, 4 million lines of code, and 2 security people, that's clearly a disaster waiting to happen. If you have 20, there may be hope. I have no idea what the proper ratios should be, if you're willing to share ratios with me I'd love to start collecting data. As I said, I don't have scientific proof behind this, it's just something I suspect is true.
  • Home Automation: Coping with Insecurity in the IoT
    Reading Matthew Garret’s exposés of home automation IoT devices makes most engineers think “hell no!” or “over my dead body!”. However, there’s also the siren lure that the ability to program your home, or update its settings from anywhere in the world is phenomenally useful: for instance, the outside lights in my house used to depend on two timers (located about 50m from each other). They were old, loud (to the point the neighbours used to wonder what the buzzing was when they visited) and almost always wrongly set for turning the lights on at sunset. The final precipitating factor for me was the need to replace our thermostat, whose thermistor got so eccentric it started cooling in winter; so away went all the timers and their loud noises and in came a z-wave based home automation system, and the guilty pleasure of having an IoT based home automation system. Now the lights precisely and quietly turn on at sunset and off at 23:00 (adjusting themselves for daylight savings); the thermostat is accessible from my phone, meaning I can adjust it from wherever I happen to be (including Hong Kong airport when I realised I’d forgotten to set it to energy saving mode before we went on holiday). Finally, there’s waking up at 3am to realise your wife has fallen asleep over her book again and being able to turn off her reading light from your alarm clock without having to get out of bed … Automation bliss!

Microsoft Corruption, Rejections, and Struggles

  • Microsoft licensing corruption scandal in Romania has ended on October 3rd
    This scandal covers buying Microsoft licensees for Romanian administration from 2004 to 2012 for total 228 millions USD. During the investigation was found that more than 100 people, former ministers, mayor of Bucuresti and businessman are involved in this corruption scandal and more than 20 millions euro are paid as bribes.
  • 49ers Colin Kaepernick, Chip Kelly review Microsoft Surface tablets, which Bill Belichick is ‘done’ using
    Ranting about Microsoft’s unreliable, sideline tablets is not a top priority for 49ers coach Chip Kelly and quarterback Colin Kaepernick, not with a five-game losing streak in tow for Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. But both Kelly and Kaepernick confirmed this week that they’ve experienced problems with the Microsoft Surface tablets. They’re just not as fed up with them as New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick, who’s lambasted the imperfect technology for years and finally declared this week: “I’m done with the tablets.”
  • Windows: When no growth is an improvement
    Research firms like IDC and Gartner have continued to forecast contraction, not expansion, in the PC business. Only when enterprise migrations to Windows 10 kick into gear do analysts see a reversal of the industry’s historic slump. That isn’t expected to happen until next year.