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Sunday, 26 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 10:01pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 10:00pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 9:58pm
Story Can Marten Mickos make 'Linux for the cloud' work for HP? Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 9:50pm
Story 50 Noteworthy New Open Source Projects Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:40pm
Story Salix Fluxbox 14.1 Is a Lightweight Modular Distro Based on Slackware Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:32pm
Story Oracle and Canonical collaborate on support for Oracle Linux on Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:22pm
Story Debian Switches Back To GNOME As Its Default Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:08pm
Story 3 tools that make scanning on the Linux desktop quick and easy Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:05pm
Story Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Enters Final Beta Freeze Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 7:59pm

Open PC: A LInux PC By The Community?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxloop.com: Open PC is a new project that aims to create and sell a Linux-based computer designed openly by Linux users.

No thanks Google, we've got Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.com.au: You can email Linus Torvalds or Mark Shuttleworth directly and get answers to your Linux questions, sometimes within minutes or hours. Try that with whoever is in charge of Android or Chrome development.

Google announces Chrome OS

Filed under
Linux
Google

zdnet.com.au: Google this afternoon announced the creation of the Google Chrome Operating System project, with the goal to build a Linux-based OS available for purchase on netbooks in the second half of 2010.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Life with Linux: The basic situation

  • Don't you hate it when people say that Linux is "hard to use"?
  • Bold Prediction: "Ubuntu's Bug 1 will be closed in the next 24 months"
  • Acer Aspire One with Linpus Linux
  • Should I disable AppArmor?
  • KDE e.V. Elects New Board of Directors
  • Gran Canaria and Akademy
  • Day 2 at Gran Canaria Desktop Summit
  • X Server 1.6.2 Gets Released
  • kde4 multihead, 4.3 rc1 tasks widget crashiness, multi-head update
  • 4 Universities Move to Cooperative Support Program for Open Source LMS
  • Neptuny Joins the Red Hat Partner Program in Italy
  • Windows "Screen Of Death" now on Linux (GDM Theme)
  • Linux Foundation Appoints Executive to Support Initiatives in Europe
  • Open Source on the Agenda
  • Why Dag, Dries and RPMforge can’t fully be trusted
  • Virtualization: Pushing Linux Into Small Businesses?
  • The Software Freedom Law Show - Episode 0x11: Patented Languages
  • Firefox 3.5 vs. Chrome 3 Showdown, Round 3

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Assign IPv6 addresses in Linux

  • Auto reboot after kernel panic
  • Switch Capslock to work as Escape on Linux
  • Speed Up Your Linux Application Loading Time with Preload
  • Firewall with iptables using mac address filtering
  • Dealing with Odd Filenames on the Commandline
  • Installing RDoc on Ubuntu Jaunty

Netbooks Are Little Notebooks, and Linux on Netbooks Rocks

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxtoday.com/blog: This newfangled netbook phenomenon has brought with it a bit of confusion, which is understandable since it is so new. The EeePC 701 launched the modern netbook craze, a tiny little low-powered thing with a 7" screen. It ran a stripped-down Linux, and at two pounds and $399, it quickly won many hearts.

Interview with Ksplice Co-Founder

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

linux-mag.com: Ksplice is an amazing new technology which allows patches to be applied directly into a running kernel, without needing a reboot. Linux Magazine talks with co-founder and Chief Operating Officer and discusses the origins of the project and what it has to offer.

Ubuntu User, You Have Some Big Issues.

Filed under
Ubuntu

daniweb.com/blogs: Quick question: What do the following things have in common?

A Mythical Horned Rabbit from Douglas, Wyoming.
A French-Canadian Linux Guy.
An A4 Format.
An African Word.
A Double-sided DVD.
An Abundance of Information.

one week of firefox 3.5

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • one week of firefox 3.5

  • Mozilla Developer News 7/7
  • Firefox stability to get a boost with multiprocess browsing
  • HideTab lets you cloak embarrassing tabs quickly
  • Opera defends against security concerns

Are Microsoft's Promises For Ever?

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Are Microsoft's Promises For Ever?

  • Mono promise is nice, Microsoft. What about Linux?
  • What is all this FOSS about Mono?
  • Will Mono benefit from Microsoft's C# patent promise?
  • Microsoft makes a loaded promise for C# and .NET
  • I still believe this is a victory for Microsoft!

Organise your music with Picard

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Organising your digital music collection can be a Herculean effort. Yet when you have several gigabytes of tracks to sift through, your only chance of finding what you want to hear is if your music files are properly tagged.

Mandriva Linux One 2009 (KDE)

Filed under
MDV

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Mandriva Linux Free is the version without any proprietary software or drivers. It’s for those who are truly committed to “free” software at its most…well…free.

Rumours of critical vulnerability in OpenSSH in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Filed under
Linux
Security

h-online.com: A posting on the Web Hosting Talk forum is feeding speculation about a critical security vulnerability in the OpenSSH server in CentOS/Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

Palm Pre Dances Nicely with Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: Summer releases of the latest smart phones from Apple, Blackberry, Google and Palm have excited geeks all over the world. The big question on the mind of Linux users has to be "Can I sync my Linux machine and my cool new phone?" We decided to find the answers specifically for the new Palm Pre.

Koala will be 'a definitive shift' for Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

techradar.com: You may, by now, have heard of a little distribution called Ubuntu, unless you happen to have been in space for the past five years. For now all you need to know is that Ubuntu is a popular offshoot of Debian, and the man behind it, Mark Shuttleworth, is considered to be a veritable Linux titan.

SUSE 11 takes off faster than 10

Filed under
SUSE

theregister.co.uk: Novell kicked out its SUSE Linux 11 release at the end of March, so it's now time to ask how it's doing. The answer: better than SUSE Linux 10.

Install VLC 1.0.0 Final In Ubuntu, Arch Linux and Fedora

Filed under
Linux

Final as in 'non release candidate', obviously there will be versions like 1.0.1 and so on. For Ubuntu, Arch Linux and Fedora installation instructions, read on.

How-To: Compile and Install VLC 1.0 in Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu 9.04 (and Kubuntu) comes with VLC 0.9.9 included in the repositories. However, VLC 1.0.0 was released today and it ships with several new features and many improvements. To install the latest release of VLC (currently 1.0.0) in either Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Xubuntu distributions, just follow the steps below:

Becta signs 'improved' Microsoft deal

Filed under
Microsoft

computerworlduk.com: Becta, the schools IT agency, has signed a new licence with Microsoft that it said offers better value for money and does not hinder open source adoption.

RIPLinuX and TestDisk Made My Day - Recovery was Possible

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: The day before yesterday something fateful happened. I laid my hands on my brother's refurbished notebook to install PCLinuxOS 2009.2 MiniMe, and by mistake deleted all the partitions.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more