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Wednesday, 28 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Publisher Transformation with Users at the Center Rianne Schestowitz 13/02/2014 - 2:24am
Story Steam client update ‘dramatically’ improves in-home experience Rianne Schestowitz 13/02/2014 - 1:47am
Story Intel Bay Trail NUC Linux Performance Preview Rianne Schestowitz 13/02/2014 - 1:42am
Story Seven Reasons to Use Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 13/02/2014 - 1:29am
Story Sailfish OS is coming to Android Devices Rianne Schestowitz 13/02/2014 - 1:23am
Story Managers are Calling for More Skilled Open Source Workers Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2014 - 8:49pm
Story New Intel NUC BIOS update fixes SteamOS, other Linux booting problems Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2014 - 8:41pm
Story Ubuntu store apps won’t work across mobile and desktop in 14.04 Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2014 - 8:32pm
Story Danish towns share IT PM tool as open source Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2014 - 8:01pm
Story LG pushes WebOS into digital signage Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2014 - 7:44pm

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to listen to your XM Radio on OpenSUSE 11, the "easy" way

  • Share Ubuntu folders with Windows (samba)
  • Manipulating CD/DVD images with AcetoneISO2
  • Bash: Piping to a Shell Script
  • Use DropBox to seamlessly sync files
  • Ubuntu: Change Sensitivity of the Synaptics Touchpad
  • Setup a Rsync server on Gentoo
  • Audacity Tutorial part 2 – applying effects
  • 50+ Resources For Your Linux Setup/Desktop/Machine/Brain

Michael Robertson Sues Me to Impede My Freedom of Speech

Filed under
Linux
Legal

kevincarmony.blogspot: As many of you know, I have used my blog as a resource to bring to light the questionable actions of Michael Robertson, and to go public with his treatment of employees and shareholders. Today I was served with a lawsuit by Michael Robertson in an effort to obscure my blog and impede my freedom of speech.

Extenders: now 400% more pretty

Filed under
KDE

pindablog.wordpress: You might have seen the screencast about extenders in the commit-digest of a couple of weeks ago. While not much features have been added since, I have applied quite some polish. Not only in the form of bugfixes, but also in the form of a fresh new look, designed by Pinheiro.

Windows 7: A First Look

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Windows 7: A First Look

  • First look at Windows 7's User Interface
  • Windows 7: Official screenshots
  • First look: Windows 7 takes on Apple
  • Windows 7 Screenshots

Is open source old news?

Filed under
OSS
  • Is open source old news?

  • Help me! I use Open Source
  • Hard questions at the heart of open source security

The 10 lamest Firefox add-ons

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • The 10 lamest Firefox add-ons

  • FireFox 3 Add-ons Recommendation List
  • Firefox Add-ons - Manage browser add-ons in centralized manner

Linux-Based Instant-On Trend Spreads Out

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux-Based Instant-On Trend Spreads Out

  • The Race to Instant-On Computers Begins
  • Could Linux be the key to instant-on for Windows laptops?

How to sell Linux netbooks to the world

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

itwire.com: 2008 has been the year of the netbook. Since the surprise runaway success of the ASUS Eee Linux PC in 2007 there has been a surge of hardware vendors joining in. Yet MSI users have poo-pooed the use of Linux on these systems. I disagree. Here's why Linux netbooks are the future.

10 Essential Applications in Ubuntu 8.10 & others

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 10 Essential Applications Included in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

  • Quick hint: Ubuntu 8.10 might already be here
  • 15 Beautiful Ubuntu Wallpapers for a Sleeker Intrepid Ibex
  • Ubuntu 8.10 better than Fedora 10?
  • Searching for package information on Debian and Ubuntu systems
  • Close but no cigar for me and Ubuntu on my Eee PC
  • Canonical's Next (And Hardest) Steps

It's Time for a FOSS Community Code of Conduct

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: Personal abuse, quotes taken out of context, misrepresentations, outright lies -- if you have any visibility in the free and open source software (FOSS) community, the chances are that you regularly face all these kinds of attacks. I suggest that community members voluntarily subscribe to a code of conduct to create a frame of reference in which the abuse can be countered and judged.

How Different Are Linux Distributions from One Another?

Filed under
Linux

computingtech.blogspot: While different Linux systems will add different logos, choose some different software components to include, and have different ways of installing and configuring Linux, most people who become used to Linux can move pretty easily from one Linux to another. There are a few reasons for this:

The netbook newbie's guide to Linux

Filed under
Linux

reghardware.co.uk: Episode Two This is a series about the Linux OS on netbooks, but we need to remind ourselves that these devices aren't personal computers. Netbooks are essentially machines you work through, out into the Cloud.

The LXF Analysis: Open source innovations

Filed under
OSS

linuxformat.co.uk: Open source/Free Software often gets a bad rap for innovation. It just copies commercial software, right? Not so, as Neil Bothwick explains -- from eye candy to the internet, FOSS has pioneered new technologies and ways of working...

Ubuntu 8.10 Slowness Dictates Needed Direction Of Newer OS Releases

Filed under
Linux

pcmech.com: "Linux" and "Slower" never fall within the same sentence, but they do now. To calm the masses out there, no, Ubuntu 8.10 will not be a crawling nightmare of computer slowness. Reading the article about the benchmark testing just goes to prove that the other shoe has finally dropped, so to speak.

Interview With Adam Oslen - Exaile Player Developer

Filed under
Software
Interviews

helpforlinux.blogspot: Few weeks ago I reviewed Exaile and have been so impressed with it that it has replaced Amarok as the default music player on my Ubuntu. So I hunted around a bit to talk to its lead developer - Adam Olsen about Exaile. He promised me that there are some great things to come in future versions. Read on to find out more:

A Closer Look At Red Hat's Plymouth

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Back in July we shared Red Hat's intentions to replace RHGB with Plymouth, a new graphical boot process that is able to benefit from the latest Linux graphics capabilities. Red Hat engineers had primarily designed Plymouth around a forthcoming feature we've talked about quite a bit known as kernel mode-setting, which provides end-users with a cleaner and flicker-free boot experience.

Preventing MySQL Injection Attacks With GreenSQL On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

GreenSQL (or greensql-fw) is a firewall for MySQL databases that filters SQL injection attacks. It works as a reverse proxy, i.e., it takes the SQL queries, checks them, passes them on to the MySQL database and delivers back the result from the MySQL database.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Non-Geeks Installing Ubuntu: Why Linux Needs Better Wireless Support

  • Interview: Fedora 10’s Better Startup
  • Mozilla's Privacy UI
  • Open Source Smackdown - live or die in the new economy, it all has an OSS angle now
  • Linux applications gain new developers on Windows and OS X
  • VMware users await Windows-free VirtualCenter, VI Client
  • Alleged Israeli GPL violation settled out of court
  • How to disable SSH host key checking
  • Mandriva Linux One 2009 - Post Installation Impressions
  • Linux May Be Worth $10.8 Billion, but Is It for Everyone?
  • Shuttleworth will burn fortune for Ubuntu
  • Opera scrambles to quash zero-day bug in freshly-patched browser
  • A look at OpenOffice Community Innovation Award winners
  • Neil Gaiman: Piracy vs. Obscurity
  • Open source begins to beat brand in business
  • Amarok October Updates
  • New Netflix player uses Silverlight to reach Mac, Linux
  • My children are already being sucked into the open-source vortex

KDE and the apps that keep the dragon hot

Filed under
KDE

bushweed.blogspot: People often question why i use Linux as a primary OS at home. In fact it is the only OS i use at home, although i have a Windows XP CD somewhere. Other than the obvious security features, and stability to the core, there are certain apps which i class as my killer apps.

Mom-compatible Kubuntu Intrepid with KDE 4

Filed under
Ubuntu

amarok.kde.org/blog: A few weeks ago, our neighbor, a fifty-something housewife, asked us to have a look at her rather new computer making strange noises and refusing to boot. Of course, this was the ideal moment to try what we first thought to end up with a dual boot:

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more