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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2014 - 11:22am
Story DemocracyOS promotes civic engagement on both sides Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2014 - 10:44am
Story Release: SymphonyOS 14.1 Now Available Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2014 - 10:31am
Story KDE Plasma 5—For those Linux users undecided on the kernel’s future Rianne Schestowitz 18/08/2014 - 9:13am
Story This Weekend in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2014 - 9:10am
Story Robolinux Xfce 7.6.1 Will "Blow Windows Users' Minds" – Gallery Rianne Schestowitz 18/08/2014 - 9:01am
Story The Time to Recommend Linux & FOSS Is Now Rianne Schestowitz 18/08/2014 - 8:53am
Story Prominent KDE Developer Says Convergence Will Not Happen Rianne Schestowitz 18/08/2014 - 8:46am
Story Moto 360 to cost $250, Best Buy accidently released details Rianne Schestowitz 17/08/2014 - 10:02pm
Story Ubuntu Touch RTM Version to get Released Soon by Canonical Rianne Schestowitz 17/08/2014 - 9:16pm

Dell now offering Studio XPS 13 with Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

engadget.com: Dell's been showing Ubuntu lots of love over the past few months, so it's no real shock to see the Linux-based operating system slide on over to Dell's hottest 13-incher.

Trying Out Moblin

Filed under
Linux

everyjoe.com: The other night, I became curious about Moblin because of the different user interface it has. It was said to be made specifically for Intel-powered netbooks. Even if its just in Beta, I really had to get its img and try it out myself.

Fedora 11 is Almost Ready to Kick Ass

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: A few more days from now, the latest and hopefully the greatest version of one of the most popular Linux distribution will be released. Let's take a look at some of the many great features.

Ubuntu on the Dell mini 10

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

mok0.wordpress: I’m a bit disappointed in the Dell’s build quality. I find the Mini 10 a bit plastic-y too. Apart from that, the Mini 10 has some really nice features.

Chromium Hits Alpha Release

Filed under
Software

softsaurus.org: The Open Source project behind the Google Chrome browser called Chromium has finally established an official Alpha release and it promises to be a very lightweight swiss army knife once completed.

Installing MyDNS & MyDNSConfig 3 On Fedora 10

Filed under
HowTos

In this tutorial I will describe how to install and configure MyDNS and MyDNSConfig 3 on Fedora 10. MyDNS is a DNS server that uses a MySQL database as backend instead of configuration files like, for example, Bind or djbdns. MyDNSConfig is an easy to use web-based interface to MyDNS.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Why Don't You Love Flock?

  • The Long Road to Gentoo
  • Managed Service Provider Hosts Ubuntu Linux Desktops
  • Edubuntu must review its core focus
  • The Ultimate Linux Device - The Kickfire Appliance
  • Simple Fault Diagnosis in Ubuntu
  • Mapping EUI Network Drives on Linux
  • 10 years of Krita
  • Upgrade to Jaunty
  • Where to Buy a Preinstalled Linux Desktop/Laptop
  • How to mount your Journalized HFS+ disk in Linux...

Linux Myth: Lack of Accounting Software … with Payroll

Filed under
Software

blog.eracc.com: To date Intuit has failed to create desktop GNU/Linux versions of Quicken and QuickBooks. The “experts” tout this as a show stopper keeping people from switching from Microsoft. There is no reason it should stop everyone.

Modify xorg.conf for better performance

Filed under
HowTos

tuxradar.com: Most distributions configure your graphics card and display automatically, but xorg.conf is still well worth fiddling with. It's a text file that contains all the configurations details.

Puppy Linux 4.2.1 is not a Puppy, it's a Poppa

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Puppy has long been the posterboy for all those who needed a light distribution. It is an independent distribution on diet by JWM and a careful selection of applications.

Moblin: Proof that Corporate Support Needed

Filed under
Linux

blog.cosmix.org: If anything the sudden appearance of Moblin has proven, beyond any doubt, that corporate support is essential if linux — and the open source community — is going to survive beyond a very very small niche.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Import Data From Spreadsheet into OpenOffice.org Database

  • Gnome thumbnails in CentOS
  • Portable VirtualBox
  • Linux Limit CPU Usage Per Process
  • Broadcasting Video from Ubuntu with WebcamStudio
  • How to open a second X session in Linux

Projects that should be integrated into the Gnome Desktop

Filed under
Software

blog.ibeentoubuntu: I'm not excited about where Gnome 3.0 is going. I don't oppose the project. I think they should instead evolve the WIMP model to make it better. With that in mind, here are some up-and-coming projects that I think Gnome should consider mentoring for inclusion.

Linux Distros For Netbooks

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com: Our Linux expert tries out netbook-ready Puppy Linux, Ubuntu Netbook Remix, Xubuntu, gOS, and Moblin, and reports on how they stack up.

Gentoo is dangerous for children

Filed under
Gentoo

hboeck.de: A german webpage called jugendschutzprogramm.de provides filters for webpages potentially dangerous for children. Now some people noticed that this page considers quite a lot dangerous.

Ubuntu Polishes GNU Screen

Filed under
Software

enterprisenetworkingplanet.com: GNU Screen is a terminal multiplexer program that Linux folk have used for ages. It allows you to turn one terminal into many, and run processes even after logging out. In this article we will give a brief overview.

Download Themes for Your Gnome Desktop with Gnome Art

Filed under
Ubuntu

Gnome Art is an art website which allows you to download and install various items such as icons, backgrounds, desktop themes, login window theme and gtk engine. This website comes with a very interesting application which is in the Ubuntu repositories. If you want to install it, run this in a terminal: Full story

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Lancelot 1.7: What's New

  • A new feature for Krita
  • Open Source vs Proprietary Routing Rumble
  • Open Source Consolidation: Less is More?
  • Red Hat Open Source Forum
  • Statistics, Market Share, Logic, and Why There Probably Can't Be Only One
  • User buy-in and clear decisions key to OSS migration
  • European Open Source Procurement Guidelines
  • New Firefox Icon: Iteration 6
  • New Firefox Icon: Iteration 7
  • Cisco Becomes Infected by the GNU GPL
  • Sometimes Linux is really better
  • My Flirtation With Linux Is Over
  • The Cisco surrender to open source
  • Windows 7, you are our only hope
  • 550 Days Later, UT3 Linux Appears Dead

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Space Saving Tips for Your GNOME Desktop

  • List 10 biggest files in a directory
  • Ubuntu Tip : gecko-mediaplayer - Media plug-in
  • Date and Calendar Module in Drupal 5: Part 1
  • Disable extension install delay counter in Firefox
  • Fix Flash Problems on Ubuntu
  • How to view a configuration file without the comments
  • Working with Drupal Audio in Flash (part 1)
  • Working with Drupal Audio in Flash (part 2)
  • Install Windows Games in Linux with PlayOnLinux
  • Create a 3D logo with The GIMP
  • PiTiVi - An Awesome Video Editor Based on GStreamer
  • How to upgrade to openoffice3.1 in LinuxMint -felicia-
  • Install hundreds of fonts in Ubuntu 9.04
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Atom Installer
    One thing that I miss about using Ubuntu is PPA’s there are lot’s of PPA in Ubuntu and you can hack around and install all types of software which are required for your usage. In the Fedora side of the world there are copr repos but they don’t have as many repos as in Ubuntu and you can’t build non-free software (don’t get me wrong here, I love FREEdom software but couldn’t resist not using some beautiful non-free applications such as Sublime). I am creating a work around for this by using shell scripts which are open source (cc0) but when those scripts are executed they install non-free software on your system.
  • MKVToolNix 9.9.0 MKV Manipulation Tool Released with New GUI Improvements, More
    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus announced today, February 20, 2017, the release and general availability of MKVToolNix 9.9.0 "Pick Up" for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. MKVToolNix 9.9.0 represents a month of hard work, during which the developer managed to add a bunch of new and interesting features, fix as many bugs reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.8.0 point release, as well as to improve the build system, especially in regards to the man pages of the software.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.2 and KDE Applications 16.12.2, More
    The developers behind the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system have announced today the immediate availability of all the latest KDE technologies released this month in the stable repositories of the distribution. Yes, we're talking about the KDE Plasma 5.9.2 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, and KDE Development Platform 4.14.29, all of which can be found in your Chakra GNU/Linux's repos if you want to run the newest KDE software.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • IOTA: IoT revolutionized with a Ledger
    Ever since the introduction of digital money, the world quickly came to realize how dire and expensive the consequences of centralized systems are. Not only are these systems incredibly expensive to maintain, they are also “single points of failures” which expose a large number of users to unexpected service interruptions, fraudulent activities and vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious hackers. Thanks to Blockchain, which was first introduced through Bitcoin in 2009, the clear benefits of a decentralized and “trustless” transactional settlement system became apparent. No longer should expensive trusted third parties be used for handling transactions, instead, the flow of money should be handled in a direct, Peer-to-Peer fashion. This concept of a Blockchain (or more broadly, a distributed ledger) has since then become a global phenomenon attracting billions of dollars in investments to further develop the concept.
  • Return Home and Unify: My Case for Unity 8
  • Can netbooks be cool again?
    Earlier this week, my colleague Chaim Gartenberg covered a laptop called the GPD Pocket, which is currently being funded on Indiegogo. As Chaim pointed out, the Pocket’s main advantage is its size — with a 7-inch screen, the thing is really, really small — and its price, a reasonable $399. But he didn’t mention that the Pocket is the resurrection of one of the most compelling, yet fatally flawed, computing trends of the ‘00s: the netbook. So after ten years, are netbooks finally cool again? That might be putting it too strongly, but I’m willing to hope.

Linux Devices

  • Compact, rugged module runs Linux or Android on Apollo Lake
    Ubiqcomm’s 95 x 95mm, Apollo Lake-based “COM-AL6C” COM offers 4K video along with multiple SATA, USB, GbE, and PCIe interfaces, plus -40 to 85°C operation. Ubiqconn Technology Inc. has announced a “COM-AL6C” COM Express Type 6 Compact form factor computer-on-module built around Intel’s Apollo Lake processors and designed to withstand the rigors of both fixed and mobile industrial applications. The module offers a choice among three Intel Apollo Lake processors: the quad-core Atom x5-E3930, quad-core x5-E3940, and dual-core x7-E3950, which are clocked at up to 2.0GHz burst and offer TDPs from 6.5 to 12 Watts.
  • Internet-enable your microcontroller projects for under $6 with ESP8266
    To get started with IoT (the Internet of Things), your device needs, well, an Internet connection. Base Arduino microcontrollers don't have Internet connectivity by default, so you either need to add Ethernet, Wi-Fi shields, or adapters to them, or buy an Arduino that has built-in Internet connectivity. In addition to complexity, both approaches add cost and consume the already-precious Arduino flash RAM for program space, which limits what you can do. Another approach is to use a Raspberry Pi or similar single-board computer that runs a full-blown operating system like Linux. The Raspberry Pi is a solid choice in many IoT use cases, but it is often overkill when all you really want to do is read a sensor and send the reading up to a server in the cloud. Not only does the Raspberry Pi potentially drive up the costs, complexity, and power consumption of your project, but it is running a full operating system that needs to be patched, and it has a much larger attack surface than a simple microcontroller. When it comes to IoT devices and security, simpler is better, so you can spend more time making and less time patching what you already made.
  • Blinkenlights!
  • Blinkenlights, part 2
  • Blinkenlights, part 3
  • [Older] Shmoocon 2017: The Ins And Outs Of Manufacturing And Selling Hardware
    Every day, we see people building things. Sometimes, useful things. Very rarely, this thing becomes a product, but even then we don’t hear much about the ins and outs of manufacturing a bunch of these things or the economics of actually selling them. This past weekend at Shmoocon, [Conor Patrick] gave the crowd the inside scoop on selling a few hundred two factor authentication tokens. What started as a hobby is now a legitimate business, thanks to good engineering and abusing Amazon’s distribution program.
  • 1.8 Billion Mobile Internet Users NEVER use a PC, 200 Million PC Internet Users never use a mobile phone. Understanding the 3.5 Billion Internet Total Audience
    As I am working to finish the 2017 Edition of the TomiAhonen Almanac (last days now) I always get into various updates of numbers, that remind me 'I gotta tell this story'.. For example the internet user numbers. We have the December count by the ITU for year 2016, that says the world has now 3.5 Billion internet users in total (up from 3.2 Billion at the end of year 2015). So its no 'drama' to know what is 'that' number. The number of current internet total users is yes, 3.5 Billion, almost half of the planet's total population (47%).