Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 22 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Canonical and Cisco Join Efforts on Policy-Based OpenStack Clouds Rianne Schestowitz 04/06/2015 - 5:56pm
Story Clonezilla Live 2.4.2-7 Is Now Available for Download with DRBL Update Rianne Schestowitz 04/06/2015 - 5:53pm
Story France to boost uptake of free software in government Rianne Schestowitz 04/06/2015 - 5:46pm
Story Pebble Time review: better on Android than iPhone Rianne Schestowitz 04/06/2015 - 3:58pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 04/06/2015 - 10:29am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 04/06/2015 - 10:25am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 04/06/2015 - 10:24am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 04/06/2015 - 10:23am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 04/06/2015 - 10:19am
Story Ubuntu Software Center: proprietary and free software mixed in a confusing UI fsmag 04/06/2015 - 8:55am

Novell Announces SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 SP 1

Filed under
SUSE
  • Novell Announces SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 Service Pack 1
  • Five things you can learn at Linux Day 2010
  • Suse Linux gets virtualization, high availability, and desktop bo
  • SUSE Linux Is Hooking Up With Btrfs Too

The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 9 (Isadora)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 9 (Isadora) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 9 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 10.04 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies.

The First DRM Pull Request For Linux 2.6.35 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: The Linux 2.6.34 kernel was released only three days ago, but David Airlie has emailed Linus Torvalds and the Linux Kernel Mailing List with the first DRM pull request for the Linux 2.6.35 kernel.

Lubuntu Netbook Remix: A Look

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Ubuntu Netbook Remix is not the only game in town for users looking for an Ubuntu interface that caters to the small screens (and, in some cases, touchscreens) of netbooks. Lubuntu also offers its own version of the “netbook remix.”

OpenSolaris and its killer features. Coming to a GNU/Linux near you?

Filed under
OS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: When we think of free operating systems we tend to think overwhelmingly of the big hitters (all GNU/Linux) like Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora and Mandriva and then of those niche distros that have been designed for low end systems or for specialist purposes like security and forensics. But Oranges are not the only fruit.

XSane Brings Sanity to the Mad, Mad World of Linux Scanning

Filed under
Software

linuxinsider.com: Scanning documents into a computer running a Linux-based operating system can often be a maddening task if you approach it the same way you would with a Windows PC. For Linux, XSane can make a world of difference.

Rekonq: A Quick Glance At Kubuntu Next Default Browser

Filed under
KDE
Software

maketecheasier.com: The talk of the town is that the next version of Kubuntu will have a new default browser, replacing Konqueror, the longtime KDE favorite.

Should *Mozilla* Fork Firefox?

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: Apparently, there's an interesting thread over on a site called Quora about the future of Firefox. It's no longer put together by a small, agile team that can turn on a sixpence, but has developed a complex, global group of skilled and generous people collaborating in different ways and at different levels.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Is Firefox Headed Towards A Massive Decline? Its Co-Founder Thinks So
  • Depend on what you use
  • Open sound series: Part 2 - OpenChord.org
  • Command line video processing using FOSS
  • Kno to Unveil its Dual Screen Linux Tablet in June
  • Going where no gearheads have gone before…
  • PC-BSD 7.1.1 on Samsung NC10 & Acer Aspire 1
  • Fighting patent aggression the open source way
  • Some Mandriva Wallpapers from Mandriva-Art
  • Jailer frees developers who test database apps
  • Automation Development Lab Joins Linux Foundation
  • Sheldon’s favorite linux based operating system
  • Transgaming customers can now save 25% off CrossOver Games
  • Help support free software - donate today
  • Hugin and patents
  • Stefano Zacchiroli (Debian Leader): Local communities are important
  • Red Hat Services Pathways

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Set up Dropbox on a GUI-less Linux server
  • Configurations for ssh that make some things more convenient
  • updating gentoo to kde-4.4.2 from kde-4.3.3
  • Gentoo: Emulating on FreeBSD 6.2-Stable
  • See Contents of A .DEB Debian / Ubuntu Package File
  • Creating diagrams in OpenOffice.org Draw and Impress
  • Give Me Liberty or Give Me Eth
  • How to manage apache's htpasswd files on Linux

Use value and free software

Filed under
OSS

siltala.net: Free software is all about use value. Even as we can celebrate the liberation of our software as free software users, we must nevertheless take a critical look at the use values we are creating, and how we can do better. I think the solution is to commercialize free software more, not less.

Thoughts on 2.6.34

Filed under
Linux

Jon Corbet: So, as most people will have heard, the 2.6.34 kernel was released on May 16. Back in February, I was predicting a mid-May release, so I hit it almost exactly. The cycle itself is highly predictable: kernel releases are routinely 10-12 weeks apart with little variation.

Linux Mint 9 (Isadora)

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Whenever a new version of Ubuntu is released, a new version of Linux Mint soon follows. This time around it’s Linux Mint 9. Linux Mint 9 is based on Ubuntu 10.04.

Ubuntu vs. Fedora: The Latest Versions Square Off

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Ubuntu regularly claims to be the most popular Linux distribution. But, if so, Fedora is a competitive second. Both have thriving communities and are a major source of free and open source software innovation. But how do the distributions really compare?

Porting Osmos to Linux: A Post-Mortem (part 2/3)

Filed under
Gaming

hemispheregames.com: Welcome to the second installment of our three-part Linux post-mortem. Part 1 lay the foundations for the article and where we’re coming from. Today’s post directly addresses the question “What worked and what didn’t?”

One of these things is not like the others

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Having a faster machine in the house means I have the luxury of trying out some of the bigger, heavier distros without feeling like I’m having my brain pressed through a bowl of mashed potatoes.

Linux Mint 9: A First Look

Filed under
Linux

linuxcritic.wordpress: The folks over at Linux Mint have just released their newest, latest and greatest, Linux Mint 9 “Isadora”.

Plasma Netbook 4.5

Filed under
KDE

notmart.org: So, it was pretty a long time since the last time I blogged about the KDE Plasma Netbook project... what's going on on that? you wanna videos?, you'll get videos Smile

The five best things coming in Fedora 13 Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: When Fedora 13, Goddard, is released on May 25, it's not going to be your usual Fedora Linux release.

Debian Project News - May 18th, 2010

Filed under
Linux

debian.org: Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Intel, Torvalds

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Intel: We've found severe bugs in secretive Management Engine, affecting millions
    Thanks to an investigation by third-party researchers into Intel's hidden firmware in certain chips, Intel decided to audit its firmware and on Monday confirmed it had found 11 severe bugs that affect millions of computers and servers. The flaws affect Management Engine (ME), Trusted Execution Engine (TXE), and Server Platform Services (SPS).
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 71 - GitHub's Security Scanner
    Josh and Kurt talk about GitHub's security scanner and Linus' security email. We clarify the esoteric difference between security bugs and non security bugs.
  • Linus Torvalds 'sorry' for swearing, blames popularity of Linux itself
    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has apologised – a bit – for calling some security-centric kernel contributors “f*cking morons”. Torvalds unleashed a profanity-laden rant at Google developer Kees Cook, over the latter's proposal to harden the kernel. Another Google security chap, Matthew Garret, asked Torvalds “ Can you clarify a little with regard to how you'd have liked this patchset to look?” To which Torvalds responded that “I think the actual status of the patches is fairly good with the default warning.”

Benchmarks: Linux Power Use, Sabrent EC-SS31, Phoronix Test Suite 7.6 M3

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Ubuntu MATE 17.10

Ubuntu Mate 17.10 is a pretty stable and rock solid distribution which has got most things right. There is nothing unlikable about the distro. However, I feel it could have been a lot better if they had allowed 4 windows to be snapped on each corners and done something about the opaque top panel. The software included are very much standard and even though some of their names have been changed we all know what’s under the hood. Overall Experience has been good. Having already tested Ubuntu with Gnome 3, I can say that Ubuntu Mate 17.10 feels a lot faster and quicker in terms of GUI response. Read more

Compact carrier turns Nvidia Jetson TX2 into an SBC

Aetina’s “ACE-N510” carrier for the Linux-powered Jetson TX1 and TX2 measures only 87 x 50mm, and offers HDMI, 2x USB 3.0, 2x CAN, and optional -20 to 70°C. When Aetina recently unveiled its Nano-ITX (120 x 120mm) ACE-N261 carrier for Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 and earlier, pin-compatible Jetson TX1 COMs, it mentioned an upcoming ACE-N510 that was even smaller. Now we have the details on the little beastie, which like Connect Tech’s Sprocket Jetson carrier, has a compact 87 x 50mm footprint that matches the Jetson modules it stacks on. The ACE-N510 is designed for smart cameras, robots, drones, industrial inspection, mobile medical, and deep learning. Read more