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Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LMDE 2 “Betsy” Cinnamon released! Roy Schestowitz 11/04/2015 - 2:03am
Story The State of NVIDIA Optimus on Linux Roy Schestowitz 11/04/2015 - 2:00am
Story ODF in the age of Big Data Roy Schestowitz 11/04/2015 - 1:37am
Story DNF 0.6.5 and DNF-PLUGINS-CORE 0.1.6 Released Rianne Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 6:36pm
Story Git Success Stories and Tips from Puppet Labs' Michael Stahnke Roy Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 5:59pm
Story A community distribution of OpenStack Roy Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 5:11pm
Story Linux Mint 17.1 Rebecca KDE review Roy Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 10:59am
Story 9 Hidden Features in KDE Roy Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 10:55am
Story GNOME 3.16.1 Arrives on April 15, Arch Linux Users Can Now Update to GNOME 3.16 Rianne Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 5:33am
Story Introducing Chromixium, an Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Distro that Looks Like Chrome OS Rianne Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 3:41am

Junior High students build their own Ubuntu computers

Filed under
Hardware
Interviews
Ubuntu

stop.zona-m.net: The Confalonieri Public Junior High School in Monza, Northern Italy set up a really interesting and original optional course for its students. I contacted the two teachers who run the course, Fabio Frittoli and Francesco De Gennaro to know something more.

Dual of denial – on the success and failure of dual licensing

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: There’s been a fair amount of attention – both positive and negative – on dual licensing in recent weeks. A few days ago Brian Aker wrote: “The fact is, there are few, and growing fewer, opportunities to make money on dual licensing.”

ImageMagick Fun

Filed under
Software

purinchu.net: Oe of my professors mailed us a PDF of a scanned document to read (and print out) for the next class. Being that is was scanned in there was a lot of excess black in the picture. I don’t know about you, but printing 2 large blocks of solid black, for 22 pages, doesn’t sound like a wise investment of toner. But ah! Why don’t I just crop off the excess part? This has to be easy, right?

Linux 2.6.24 Through Linux 2.6.33 Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: We launched our first system in the Linux kernel testing farm just prior to the Linux 2.6.33 kernel development cycle and found a number of notable regressions during the past three months. Now with the Linux 2.6.34 kernel development cycle getting into swing, we have added an additional two systems to our daily kernel benchmarking farm.

KDE 4.4: Does It Work Yet?

Filed under
KDE

linux-mag.com: I used to love KDE way back in the KDE 1.x and KDE 2.x days of yore. I migrated away from KDE during the early 3.x days in favor of GNOME. I’m stepping back into KDE from a GNOME user’s viewpoint with a single question in my mind: “Does it work yet?”

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Daemonize any process on Linux
  • My top 10 geek epitaphs
  • Preparing the Linux Kernel Source
  • Debugging with emacs+valgrind
  • Samba: Can it get any easier?
  • Launchy: Desktop Shortcut Launcher
  • Clean up your system with Bleachbit
  • What is your taste in computing?
  • Control Your Children's Internet Access with Gnome Nanny
  • Gnome Subtitles 1.0
  • Is it time for a Windows or Linux server in your home?
  • Anarchy in the EULA
  • Using find to locate files
  • Hidden Linux : Example commands - find
  • Firefox 4 – Updates, Roadmaps And Changes So Far
  • How to remove empty spaces in filenames
  • Hello world for bare metal ARM using QEMU
  • FlightGear 2.0 Released
  • Using Tabs in the KDE 4 Taskbar

13 Linux Twitter Applications Reviewed

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: Once upon a time Twitter users had to use a web-browser to update their status and check their tweets. Then came the dawn of the twitter app...

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #182

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is Issue #182 for the week February 21st - February 27th, 2010.

Linux: Current State of Voice Dictation and Recognition

Filed under
Linux
Software

blog.eracc.com: For the past three weeks I and my research assistant have been searching the WWW for dictation software that works under GNU/Linux. We have discovered this to be an exercise in frustration with several dead ends.

Calling all Geeks – Fedora 13 needs your help

Filed under
Linux

duncsweb.com: The Fedora project needs a slogan for their next release of Fedora, Fedora 13, they need it as quick as possible so that it can be include it in the alpha release of Fedora 13 that’s coming out on March 9.

Heroes and Villains of Tech

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Mac
Web
Sci/Tech

pcworld.com: Here's a look at standout good guys and bad guys -- from passionate heroes who balance profit with innovation and social responsibility to money-mad, egomaniac villains who simply cannot be trusted.

Distro Hoppin`: Igelle 1.0.0

Filed under
Linux

itlure.com: What I've got here is a Linux distribution that is based on... NOTHING! Yes, peeps, you've heard me! Igelle stands proud on its own two feet and presents itself as "the world's most flexible operatings system".

Desktop Linux vs. Windows 7

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

fewt.com: While I have exposure to Windows and Linux distributions on many disparate devices, this review will focus on a single model computer; the Asus Eee PC 1000HE.

Why Fedora needs an Updates Policy

Filed under
Linux

jwboyer.livejournal.com: A huge thread-o-doom on Fedora and updates and what should be done and why the policy is horrible has sprouted on the fedora-devel list (yes, it's now called devel@lists.fp.o, but I don't care.) But wait... there is no draft policy yet so how can it be horrible?

Time To Rebut The IIPA's FUD Against Open Source

Filed under
OSS

opensource.org: A recent blog posting at The Guardian about the US "Special 301" rules has generated deep concern around the global open source community. It points to this year's recommendations from the controversially-named International Intellectual Property Alliance.

4 New Themes For Lucid

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 4 New Themes For Lucid including Homosapien and Sorbet
  • Ubuntu One Music has No Watermarks
  • Ubuntu Lucid Makes Scanning Simple

Dedo Does Debian - Review

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Debian is one of the more important Linux distributions. Without Debian, we would probably not have Ubuntu or APT and Linux desktop would still be a dream. And it just happens that I never gave it a proper review, until now.

The Perennial Year of the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

tuxtweaks.com: It's become a tradition (and a bit of a running joke) for bloggers and tech pundits to declare that this year (whatever year you're in) will be The Year of the Linux Desktop. So in following with that tradition, I'm here to declare that 2010 will be The Year of the Linux Desktop.

KDESC 4.3+: Video, Music, Image and Document Preview in Dolphin

Filed under
Software
HowTos

mygnulinux.com: In most distributions that come with KDE Software Compilation 4.3 and above, opening Dolphin for browsing the filesystem will give you Preview Mode Button. We will expand on this option.

The First Ever Gnome Shell Themes

Filed under
Linux

It's very easy to create Gnome Shell themes as only some very basic knowledge of CSS and a bit of GIMP is needed. For now, installing a Gnome Shell theme implies overwriting the original theme files and only one theme can be installed, which each new theme overwriting the previous one. But Gnome Shell is still in early development stages, so this is a good start.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Programming Skills, Beignet OpenCL Now Supports LLVM 5.0, DRUD Tech Releases DDEV Community

     
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    When learning how to code for the first time, there's a common misconception that learning how to code is primarily about learning the syntax of a programming language. That is, learning how the special symbols, keywords, and characters must be written in the right order for the language to run without errors. However, focusing only on knowledge of syntax is a bit like practicing to write a novel by only studying grammar and spelling. Grammar and spelling are needed to write a novel, but there are many other layers of skills that are needed in order to write an original, creative novel. [...] This is the layer that is most often focused on in the early learning phase. Syntax skills essentially means how to read and write a programming language using the rules for how different characters must be used for the code to actually work.
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Microsoft EEE

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Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

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    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
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    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
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Databases: PostgreSQL 10 RC1 and Greenplum

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    Pivotal’s latest release of its Greenplum analytic database includes multicloud support and, for the first time, is based entirely on open source code. In 2015, the company open sourced the core of Pivotal Greenplum as the Greenplum Database project. “This is the first commercially available release that we are shipping with the open source project truly at its core,” said Elisabeth Hendrickson, VP of data research and development at Pivotal.