Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Welcome Windows Users - Adapt or Die!?

Filed under
Linux I've been seeing an increasing attitude rising in the Linux and Open Source community lately that I think needs to be addressed. People are switching to Linux, and doing so in droves. But something else is happening because of that: Linux and FOSS are changing.

Google dumps Firefox from download bundle

Filed under
Moz/FF Google has made Chrome the default browser in the English version of Google Pack, the search company's application bundle, replacing Firefox.

Patent problem for a future Linux feature?

Filed under
Linux A report from suggests that there may be a patent problem with KSM, a memory management technology that is a candidate for inclusion in a future version of Linux.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 282

Filed under

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • HowTo: Getting a lean system with a custom Ubuntu install

  • News: openSUSE prepares 11.1, Debian "Lenny" installer in deep freeze, Fedora FAQ updates, Glasgow University switches to Slackware, interviews with MEPIS and OpenSolaris developers, The Economist recommends Linux
  • Released last week: Slackware Linux 12.2, PC-BSD 7.0.2, Slax 6.0.9
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.1, Linux Mint 6
  • New additions: Jibbed
  • New distribution: Jaris, Tiny Core Linux, Ubuntu Privacy Remix
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Where does Linux want to go today?

Filed under
Linux I have become concerned about some thoughts that people have started expressing. The latest was some guy at a French sounding blog who wrote a hissy fit trying to validate his reasons for leaving Linux. It did start me thinking. Where is Linux headed? What is the ultimate goal of Linux?

In Skins vs Believers: Linux always loses

Filed under
Linux When Microsoft hires somebody like IDG to prove that Linux is less effective than Windows it’s easy to separate argument from arguers - and when the consultants prove their case by hiring the least competent MCSEs they can find and turning them loose with the Linux root password.

The State of UK Terrestrial Web TV

Filed under
Just talk

So what i'd like to do here, is round up the offerings of the main 5 TV channels, what i'm looking for, is the following, how do they work on the following platforms. WindowsXP, Ubuntu 8.10 and Mac OSX Tiger. I'm using XP and not vista, because i believe there are more XP installs out there. i'll use firefox as the browser of choice to keep the browser the same across all browsers, however will also give the default browser for each OS a go as well, just to see how different the experience is.

today's leftovers

Filed under
  • Some praise for Fedora and some other stuff

  • P-Magazine using Drupal
  • Moonshiner: a graphical front-end to ps2pdf
  • Netbook Heroes
  • Updating Linux Passwords Via The Web Browser
  • Animated Wallpaper on your Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop
  • epidermis - Download and Apply Theme Packs in one Click
  • Safely Using Files as Block Devices with Partitions
  • Dear Debian developers
  • QuickStart - Back-up, Restore, and Set-up Ubuntu Quickly and Easily
  • USB 3.0 Demo with 5 second Ubuntu boot!!
  • KDE Forums: What's new?
  • Bulletproof your server to survive Digg/Slashdot
  • Windows you done stole my netbook market away: Linux
  • The Gritty World Of User Interface Exploration
  • Enemies of GNU/Linux?
  • debtree - Generate Package Dependency Graphs
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #121

The Freedom Key

Filed under

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: I bought a Dell M1330 laptop with Ubuntu pre-installed and yet it still has a key on the keyboard proudly displaying the Windows logo. So how could I fix this? Looking at the SFLC logo it struck me that what I needed was a "frdm" key.

Fedora Core 10 might make me a believer again

Filed under
Linux For a long time I was a wearer of the Fedora. Starting with Red Hat 4.2 all the way to 8 and then adopting Fedora when Red Hat when corporate, I was a proud user of all things Fedora. But then something happened.

I hope someone maintains Amarok 1.4

Filed under
Software Amarok 2 was released on December 10th. I have KDE 4 on my experimentation laptop, so I tried it. I don't like it.

KDE 4.2 Beta++

Filed under
KDE The Beta1 of KDE 4.2 Desktop Environment has been released at 26.11.2008. So it’s been there for a while - let’s take a look at the revision 893046.

Top Linux Moments of 2008

Filed under
Linux It’s been a rather interesting year for Linux, with just enough ups and downs to keep us on our toes. And, being as it is the heart of December, I figured now is a good time to scour through the Linux Action Shows of the past year and find, what I consider to be, the top moments from 2008.

More Happy holiday Wallpapers for KDE

Filed under

wadejolson.wordpress: There’s now a total of 11 holiday wallpapapers - enough to for the 12 Days of Christmas song assuming you already have a partridge in a pear tree wallpaper.

A Quantum of FOSS

Filed under
OSS I have been thinking for a while about how to get more exposure for Free and Open Source Software. I work in a school district which, like most, is owned by Microsoft. I have tried for several years to get more FOSS on the desktops and I have had only minimal success.

Slackware 12.2: Still not for me.

Filed under
Slack Those of you who've read them know I'm not a fan, and a lot of people don't like that. Nevertheless, with each new version I hope that this one will be the one I can actually use. I admit there's a kind of geeky cool that comes from running Slackware.

ferm: a straightforward firewall configuration tool

Filed under
Software Grumble… a postgresql server on an old Sun workstation isn’t visible to another old Sun workstation which (in theory…) is storing data on the postgresql server. The culprit was a misconfigured firewall.

“More Linux Distributions” Isn’t Necessarily the Answer

Filed under
Linux AJ Venter writes that we need more, not less Linux distributions. I’m not convinced that we need more distributions. More distributions would result in huge duplication of work:

Intel Atom On Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuSE, Mandriva

Filed under
Hardware Back in September we looked at the Intel Atom performance on a few Linux distributions using the ASUS Eee PC 901, but now with new stable releases of some of the most popular distributions out in the wild, we've decided to re-conduct these tests. We are using a slightly different Atom-based system this time and we are comparing the performance on Ubuntu 8.10, Fedora 10, Mandriva 2008, and OpenSuSE 11.1.

Flock - The Ultimate Student Browser

Filed under
Software I’m using Flock as my main browser. However for most of you, Firefox will be your choice. The reason I would recommend using Flock over Firefox to create the ultimate student research browser is the number of built in functionalities which really is quite useful for a student.

Also: Install Flock in Ubuntu

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.