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Tuesday, 20 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Canonical Closes Numerous OpenSSH Vulnerabilities in Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 7:32pm
Story A User’s Eye View of Bodhi 3.1.0 & Moksha Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 7:29pm
Story The Future of Developing Firefox Add-ons Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 7:22pm
Story Samsung rumored to be working on 18.4-inch Android tablet Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 7:15pm
Story Leftovers: GNOME Software Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 12:59pm
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 12:02pm
Story The dummy’s guide to a first-time Linux install (it’s easier than you think) Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 10:07am
Story Now your Raspberry Pi can water your lawn Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 9:49am
Story FCC Boosting Open Video Platform for Disabled Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 9:28am
Story LibreOffice 5.0: The strongest release to date Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 9:10am

Relooking at Cairo Dock For Linux

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: More than a year ago, we reviewed Cairo Dock for Linux and how you can install and configure it in Ubuntu Intrepid. Fast forward to the present moment, Cairo Dock (now known as Glx-Dock) is still very much alive and has become one of the best dock application for Linux.

thoughts on the Ubuntu Application Review System

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Some personal thoughts on the Ubuntu Application Review System
  • Ubuntu, Canonical Wallow in Muddy Waters with Contributors' Agreements
  • Clearing the FUD around Ubuntu Application Review Process

Getting Amnesia is Frightening

Filed under
Gaming

linuxlock.blogspot: If you are someone who watches a horror movie, and you try your darndest to get the soon-to-be victims on screen to not die of pure stupidity by giving them handy advice like "Don't go into the attic!", "Turn on the light, fool!", "Run AWAY from the guy with the chainsaw!", then this might be the game for you.

Red Hat to post solid Q2

Filed under
Linux
  • Red Hat to post solid Q2: analyst
  • Red Hat Down 1.7% Ahead Of Tomorrow's Second Quarter Earnings Report

sidux changes to aptosid by upgrade or ISO

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: A press release dated September 11 came to the community's attention Monday, September 13 of the renaming or, as some reported, a fork of sidux to aptosid.

Debian Project News - September 21st

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's twelfth issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Topics covered in this issue include: Linux Mint Debian Edition, Grave software bugs, and This week in Debian interviews Stefano Zacchiroli.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.36 (Part 2) - File systems, networking and storage

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: 2.6.36 offers VFS optimisations, has returned to integrating Ext3 file systems with "data=ordered" by default and can store data from shared Windows or Samba disks in local cache to improve performance. Numerous new and improved drivers enhance the kernel's storage and network hardware support.

Are Your Desktop Effects Slowing You Down?

Filed under
Software

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Whenever I perform a 3D benchmark in Linux one of the first questions I get asked about the results is: Were your desktop effects turned off?

Stallman crashes European Patent session

Filed under
OSS

itnews.com.au: Software freedom activist Richard Stallman made an unexpected appearance at a European Patent Office presentation in Brisbane today to protest Australian software patents.

Living through the Wild West of FOSS History

Filed under
Linux
OSS

lxer.com: Could things be more exciting in the the world of FOSS right now? Yes it could, but let's not be too hasty..

SCAP: computer security for the rest of us

Filed under
Security

opensource.com: I'm setting up a new computer. I get through the registration screens, install my software, change my wallpaper, and everything's working fine. I'm left, though, with a lingering, uneasy feeling: I don't know if this machine is secure.

Oracle's "new" kernel for RHEL clone: The real truth

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: Oracle made a big noise in the Linux community yesterday by announcing its own spin on the Linux kernel on top if its so-called Unbreakable Linux. Oracle presented the announcement as offering a "modern" Linux kernel. Underneath the hype, what's Oracle really offering, and what does it mean for Linux?

Direct3D 10/11 Is Now Natively Implemented On Linux

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: It's a pity Luca Barbieri or any Mesa / Gallium3D developers are not at Oktoberfest as they are deserving of more than a few Maß of Augustiner. In fact, today a new Gallium3D state tracker was pushed into Mesa and it's perhaps the most interesting state tracker for this open-source graphics driver architecture yet.

Mozilla Joins OIN

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox maker Mozilla joins Linux group with IBM, Red Hat
  • Mozilla Joins Open Invention Network as Licensee

Lifesaver for Maverick

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Lifesaver for Maverick
  • restrictive rules galore
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #211

Canonical Hosts Leading ODMs at Ubuntu Hardware Summit

Filed under
Linux

Original Equipment Manufacturers and Original Design Manufacturers
Learn latest techniques about shipping Ubuntu, hardware enablement and more

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • If VMware buys Novell, what happens to the Microsoft deal?
  • Easily Building Software for Multiple Distributions and Platforms
  • Getting the Twain to Meet
  • Podcast: B-Sides – What’s up with KDE?
  • Announcing the Ubuntu Application Review Process
  • Traders Hedging Bets in Red Hat as Put Volume Surges
  • Red Hat Earnings Preview
  • UberStudent Is an Ubuntu System Custom-Built for Students
  • 6 Open Source Projects for 802.1X Network Authentication
  • Canonical and others close kernel holes
  • Love is all you need
  • What happens if Mr. Nepomuk meets a bunch of Telepathyans?
  • Unofficial Opensuse FAQ Update on progress
  • Nicholas Negroponte on Success of One Laptop Per Child
  • Novell announces new SUSE Linux Certification Programs
  • EU publishes open source tools to preserve digital holdings
  • Mandriva Fork and Unity
  • New OOo 3.3.x Developer Snapshot
  • Webmin's virtual twin
  • Linux From Scratch DIY guide updated
  • DtO: Pirates Are Overrated Anyway
  • Planning grant paves way for open source Variations on Video project at IU Libraries

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install HandBrake on Ubuntu 10.04
  • Shell In A Box Gives Your Browser Terminal Status
  • Recover Grub2 After Windows Install
  • Diaspora on openSUSE
  • How to add languages in Linux (Gnome)
  • Syncing your BlackBerry on Ubuntu
  • Browse Music Via 'Album Art Display' in Rhythmbox
  • Get back CTRL-ALT-Backspace in Fedora and Ubuntu
  • Record Videos of Your Desktop on Any OS for Free
  • Text Encryption utility using AES - Furius Cipher
  • use Wildcards, Quotes, Back Quotes and Apostrophes in shell commands

Time for some Enlightenment.

Filed under
Software

toolbox.com/blogs: In the interests of efficiency I eventually settled on XFCE as my desktop environment to give me a balance of eye candy and resource efficiency. It did everything quite well and I had no trouble watching videos. Until...

Yet Another Music Player for Linux: Foobnix

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: When it comes to music players, Linux evolved heavily during the last three or four years, and new players are announced on a regular basis. It's time to get in touch with a new one, namely, Foobnix.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Voting Machines With Windows and Back Doors in Windows Help Crypto-jacking

  • Election Security a High Priority — Until It Comes to Paying for New Voting Machines [Ed: Sadly, the US has outsourced its voting machines to a private company whose systems are managed by Microsoft]
    When poll workers arrived at 6 a.m. to open the voting location in Allentown, New Jersey, for last November’s gubernatorial election, they found that none of the borough’s four voting machines were working. Their replacements, which were delivered about four hours later, also failed. Voters had to cast their ballots on paper, which then were counted by hand. Machine malfunctions are a regular feature of American elections. Even as worries over cybersecurity and election interference loom, many local jurisdictions depend on aging voting equipment based on frequently obsolete and sometimes insecure technology. And the counties and states that fund elections have dragged their heels on providing the money to buy new equipment.
  • Congress Can Act Right Now to Prevent Interference in the 2018 Elections [Ed: "confidence" is not security]

    To create that confidence the SAFE Act would: [...]

  • America’s Election Meddling Would Indeed Justify Other Countries Retaliating In Kind
    There is still no clear proof that the Russian government interfered with the 2016 U.S. election in any meaningful way. Which is weird, because Russia and every other country on earth would be perfectly justified in doing so.
  • NSA Exploit Now Powering Cryptocurrency Mining Malware [Ed: Microsoft Windows back door]
    You may have been asked if you'd like to try your hand at mining cryptocurrency. You may have demurred, citing the shortage in graphics cards or perhaps wary you were being coaxed into an elaborate Ponzi scheme. So much for opting out. Thanks to the NSA, you may be involved in mining cryptocurrency, but you're likely not seeing any of the benefits.
  • Cryptocurrency-mining criminals that netted $3 million gear up for more
    Separately, researchers from security firm FireEye said attackers, presumably with no relation to the one reported by Check Point, are exploiting unpatched systems running Oracle's WebLogic Server to install cryptocurrency-mining malware. Oracle patched the vulnerability, indexed as CVE-2017-10271, in October.

today's howtos

More Android Leftovers

Benchmarking Amazon EC2 Instances vs. Various Intel/AMD CPUs

Given the recent performance changes following the Spectre/Meltdown CPU vulnerability mitigation and having just wrapped up some fresh CPU bare metal benchmarks as part of that testing as well as the recent AMD Raven Ridge launch, I've carried out a fresh round this week of benchmarks on various Amazon EC2 on-demand instance types compared to a number of bare metal Intel and AMD processors in looking at how the compute performance compares. Read more