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Wednesday, 13 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Gaming box lets Linux play the slots

Filed under
Hardware

linuxfordevices.com: Acrosser announced a PC that can run Linux inside arcade gaming consoles or slot machines. The ACE-S8700 includes golden finger and ccTalk interfaces, a VGA output, four serial ports, plus an intrusion logger and up to 512KB of battery-backed static RAM.

Redshift Keeps Your Eyes Sharp & Helps You Sleep

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: If you spend a lot of time looking at your computer – and if you read this blog I’m betting you do – you might notice that after a while your eyes start to hurt, and that you have trouble going to sleep at night. There’s a good reason for this:

Ubuntu 10.04 Upgrade: Best Practices Checklist

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

itworld.com: ave you been thinking about upgrading your computer to Ubuntu 10.04? I recently made the leap, at the prompting of my Update Manager. The process went fairly smoothly, but I did have to deal with a couple of minor annoyances. Here are a few tips.

Issue three of the 'International Free and Open Source Software Law Review'

Filed under
OSS

ifosslr.org: The Editorial Committee is delighted to announce issue three of the 'International Free and Open Source Software Law Review' (IFOSS L. Rev.) is now available.

The fragile balance between fast and reliable

Filed under
Linux
Software

hwoarang.silverarrow.org: Being a Distro developer, or a packager if you prefer, is not always that simple. Many people think that our “job” is quite straight forward. All we need to do is to read the INSTALL file and then adapt the instructions into an ebuild format and we are done. Well it is definitely more than that.

epic moment: free and fast graphics at last

Filed under
Hardware
Software

vizzzion.org/blog: Well, epic for a Free software geek. I’m now running openSUSE on my desktop, which has an AMD RadeonHD 4350 card. So, what’s the epic moment?

Serve Up Your Music with Zeya

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linuxjournal.com: Have you always wanted to set up your own music station to stream your latest music collection to your friends or colleagues? Have you been thinking lately of setting up an always-on music streaming server so that you can just open up your web browser and listen to your favorite tracks?

Heroes of Newerth - Charge!

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: Linux games are many and varied. You can find pretty much anything you need, from simple arcades via racing all the way to expansive and elaborate tactical shooters. Still, one aspect of the Linux gaming scene is underplayed, this being the Real Time Strategy (RTS). However, that is about to change.

Open Source: The capitalists' choice

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: I often hear people referring to Open Source and Free Software advocates jokingly, or not so jokingly, as "communists" or "hippies". Rubbish!

All hail the easy to use!

Filed under
Linux

I've run Linux since before the turn of the century. I know Linux. I love the commandline. But after 10 years of fiddling, I've come to realize one significant thing.

openSUSE 11.3 RC1 is available

Filed under
SUSE

Soyuz Launch Vehicle in Blender: Part I, Modelling the Core Stage

Filed under
HowTos

For Lunatics, we need several space vehicles. The Soyuz launch vehicle is one of these, and it was relatively easy to model. In Part I, I’ll demonstrate the basic modelling techniques I used to create the Core Stage.

FSF calls for ACTA fight

Filed under
OSS
  • Free Software Foundation calls for ACTA fight
  • Stallman and FSF start anti-ACTA campaign
  • Software freetards demand axing of ACTA

Linux Desktop Stigma Draws Ire and Fire

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: Is it true that, if you speak up for GNU/Linux on the Desktop, you get flamed? I just had a virtual conversation with someone who claims that this assertion is fact.

Mono is a disease. Why spread it?

Filed under
Software

toolbox.com/blogs: Mono, Glandular fever or its proper name, Mononucleosis is a very infectious disease which many people suffer through in their childhood. It usually has a stigma attached to it and is used in a slang form for ridicule or alienation. Related by the shortened name to this biological virus is the Mono project for Linux.

Pay what you want for Kiddix OS

Filed under
Linux

crunchgear.com: From Microsoft Bob to Edubuntu there have been a number of attempts at making computers of various sorts easier and more useful for young people. Another participant in this space is Kiddix.

Scenari – A powerful application to create and publish documents

Filed under
Software

bapoumba.wordpress: scenari is making it easy, understand take care of most of the tech stuff and I can concentrate on the course content, the outline, the exercises or tests I wish student to perform etc. On the teaching method and pedagogy, basically.

Disk Backup With Amanda On Debian Lenny

Filed under
HowTos

Amanda is an open source client/server solution to back up filesystems. Backups are triggered by the backup server, backup definitions are located on the servers but exclusion lists are located on the client.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Hating KDE4… Again, if only fleetingly
  • Hanako Games GNU/Linux Ports Are Coming
  • VP8 Codec Optimization Update
  • easy to use Lucid-themed conky bar now even easier to use
  • PocketBook 301+ Comfort review
  • Hobbyist kit turns BeagleBoard into a tablet
  • Good bye Microsoft!
  • Linux on a Touchscreen? Try Jolicloud
  • The Search for the Perfect Project Setup
  • 10 great illustrations of Linux humor
  • Illumination Software Creator 2.0 Beta 2
  • _FORTIFY_SOURCE, optimisations, and other details
  • Operation Cleansweep making progress… (updated)
  • Opera 10.6 Beta released
  • Symbian faces 'Titanic' task to go open source – Funambol
  • New Flock Is Simpler, Now Based on Chrome
  • Sabayon Release Name Shuffling (CoreCD/SpinBase/CoreCDX)

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • 4 Ways To Use Remember The Milk On Linux Desktop
  • RabbitVCS - Easy version control for Linux
  • How to customize Pardus 2009.2
  • Burn CD in Lucid
  • Convert .DAA files to .ISO in Linux with Poweriso
  • Calling tasksel with useful output
  • Zarafa: Fedora’s Exchange “killer”
  • [SOLVED] Volume always muted on startup
  • Terminator is getting a plugin system
  • Reset system wide cursor theme
  • lynis - Security and System auditing tool for Linux
  • Install Compiz & Compiz Fusion plugins on Ubuntu 10.04
  • Split huge files in Ubuntu or any other Linux distro
  • How to record your Linux shell session
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More in Tux Machines

Games: Radeon Benchmarks, New Games, and CrossOver 17

  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 vs. RADV/RadeonSI Radeon Linux Gaming Performance
    With today's AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Linux driver release alongside the Radeon Software Adrenalin Driver for Windows users, it's significant in a few ways. First and foremost, AMD has stuck to their word of the past two years and is now able to open-source their official Vulkan Linux driver. When it comes to AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 itself you are now able to mix-and-match driver components to choose what pieces you want of AMD's somewhat complicated driver make-up. Additionally, their OpenGL/Vulkan drivers in 17.50 have some new feature capabilities. So with that said here's a fresh look at how the AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 professional driver performance compares to the latest open-source RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan drivers.
  • The End Is Nigh for Linux gamers is now out of beta on Steam
    Did you get a little worried at the start of that headline? Fret not, as it's about the game 'The End Is Nigh' and it's now out of beta on Steam for Linux.
  • The GOG winter sale is on, you can grab Grim Fandango Remastered for free
  • Run Your Favorite Windows Apps and Games Directly on Your Mac or Linux OS
    It’s almost 2018, and for some reason there still exists an obnoxious barrier between Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems when it comes to running apps and playing games. CrossOver 17 for Linux was designed to break that tedious barrier down, by allowing you to run your favorite Windows apps and games directly on your Mac or Linux computer, and it’s available for over 50% off at just $19.

Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD

  • NVIDIA Pushes Out CUDA 9.1 With Compiler Optimizations, Volta Enhancements & More
    AMD isn't the only one busy with GPU software updates today but NVIDIA has issued CUDA 9.1 as their first feature update to the CUDA 9 compute platform.
  • Happy Holidays: AMD Finally Pushing Out Open-Source Vulkan Driver
    Ahead of the Vulkan 1.0 debut nearly two years ago, we heard that for AMD's Vulkan Linux driver it was initially going to be closed-source and would then be open-sourced once ready. At the time it sounded like something that would be opened up six months or so, but finally that milestone is being reached! Ahead of Christmas, AMD is publishing the source code to their official Vulkan Linux driver.
  • The Feature Differences Now Between AMD's Two OpenGL & Two Vulkan Linux Drivers
    For modern AMD graphics cards there are two OpenGL drivers and two Vulkan drivers available to Linux users/gamers that support the same modern AMD GPUs, not counting the older AMD Linux drivers, etc. Here's a rundown now on how those drivers compare. With AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 now allowing you to mix and match driver components and AMD finally open-sourcing their official Vulkan driver, the scene may be even more confusing about which AMD Linux driver(s) to use depending upon your use-case.
  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Now Bundles Open-Source Components, Lets You Mix & Match Drivers
    There's more Radeon Linux excitement today beyond AMD finally open-sourcing their Vulkan driver. Coming out today is the AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 driver that bundles in the open-source RADV and RadeonSI drivers too, in letting you "mix and match" the driver components you want for your system.

End of Fedora 27 Modular Server

  • Fedora 27 Server classic release after all — and Modularity goes back to the drawing board
    You may remember reading about plans for Fedora 27 Server. The working group decided not to release that at the same time as the general F27 release, and instead provided a beta of Fedora 27 Modular Server. Based on feedback from that beta, they decided to take a different approach, and the Modularity subproject is going back to the drawing board. Fortunately, there is a contingency plan: Fedora’s release engineering team made a “classic” version of Fedora 27 Server — very similar to F26 Server, but with F27’s updated package set. The quality assurance ran this version through validation testing, and it’s being released, so:
  • Fedora 27 Modular Server Gets Canned; Fedora 27 Server Classic Released
    - The Fedora Project's plans on delivering an initial "Fedora 27 Modular Server" build constructed under their new packaging principles has been thwarted. Due to less than stellar feedback on their Fedora 27 Modular Server build, the Fedora Modular working group is going back to the drawing board for determining a brighter future to its design. Previous to being canned, F27 Modular Server was delayed to January but is now being abandoned in its current form.

Early Returns on Firefox Quantum Point to Growth

When we set out to launch Firefox Quantum earlier this year, we knew we had a hugely improved product. It not only felt faster — with a look and feel that tested off the charts — it was measurably faster. Thanks to multiple changes under the hood, we doubled Firefox’s speed while using 30% less memory than Chrome. In less than a month, Firefox Quantum has already been installed by over 170M people around the world. We’re just getting started and early returns are super encouraging. Read more Also: Mozilla Joins Net Neutrality Blackout for ‘Break the Internet’ Day