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Tuesday, 31 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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NVIDIA 173.14.05 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: NVIDIA's last Linux display driver release was just shy of two months ago when they had unveiled the 173.08 Beta driver with compatibility for the GeForce 9800 series and other new GeForce 9 parts. NVIDIA this morning has released the 173.14.05 driver, which marks the return to their old naming convention, but it doesn't bring many changes compared to the recent beta releases and just a regurgitated release announcement.

Microsoft’s deceptive advertising, again.

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
  • Microsoft’s deceptive advertising, again.

  • Microsoft seeks open-source community manager
  • Ozzie: Open source is greatest threat to Microsoft

Order From Chaos: Choosing A Linux Distribution

Filed under
Linux

bizriver.com: Choosing a Linux distribution from the dozens, if not hundreds, of available options can be a daunting and confusing proposition. What is the best distro? What are the differences between distros? How do I choose? These are all good questions. In this multi-part article, I will give you my opinion and guidelines for choosing.

3 Ways To Linux For The Weak Of Heart

Filed under
Linux

pcmech.com: Making the switch from Microsoft Windows or Apple’s OS X to Linux can be a daunting proposition for most people. There are a lot of negative myths, half truths and misinformation out there that scare many people off. Fortunately there are several ways to experiment with, and get to know, Linux that will not change your system as it is now.

Ubuntu 8.04 - keep up the good work

Filed under
Ubuntu

arijitsarkar.wordpress: Let me admit that I’m not an Ubuntu fan. This is not because that it’s getting all the limelight in the Linux world and I am a Fedora user. I don’t use it much becuase it’s too user-friendly. Yes, it’s so user-friendly that I’m not getting the fun of using Linux.

And:

  • Ubuntu Linux
  • Ubuntu 8.04
  • My Take on Ubuntu

Linux is ready for your desktop, and your business

Filed under
Linux

pcadvisor.co.uk/blogs: Linux? That's only for geeks, right? Like its forerunner Unix it conjures up visions of terminal windows and cryptic commands.

Qt 4.3.5: Two steps back and one step forward

Filed under
Software

trolltech.com/blogs: Earlier this month, we released the single, largest release of Qt since the 4.0.0 release two years ago. Qt 4.4.0 is the result of 10 months of hard work by the Trolls, including numerous distractions. And while it’s being digested by our clients and users, we’re working on Qt 4.4.1, which will include fixes for bugs that were already known at the time of the 4.4.0 release, as well as some that people have reported.

OOo Basic crash course: Creating a simple application launcher

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: In previous installments of the crash course, you've learned how to build a simple basket tool, a task manager, and even a word game. This time, let's take a look at how you can use the skills you picked up from those exercises to create a simple application launcher, which will allow you to start virtually any application without leaving the convenience of OpenOffice.org.

Linux On The Desktop: Who Cares

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Every so often, you read on Slashdot, Digg, or some other techie news site that Linux is finally ready for the desktop. It's finally to the point that any end user could sit down at a computer and happily compute away. The applications are sufficiently sanitized and Windows-like that even Grandma can use them. I think it's fair to say that most of our previous conceptions of "ready for the desktop" are moot points.

Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring review

Filed under
MDV

zdnet.co.uk: Linux distros are a bit like buses (bear with me on this) — miss one and another is bound to come along sooner or later. In the case of Mandriva Linux, it's the 2008 Spring edition that benefits from the usual long list of component updates together with full support for the Asus Eee PC, improved synchronisation with mobile devices, PulseAudio sound infrastructure and a handful of other enhancements.

Slackware 12.1 First Impressions

Filed under
Slack

ever-increasing-entropy.blogspot: Late last week I downloaded and installed Slackware 12.1 on my aging (OK, old) Toshiba laptop side by side with Vector Linux Light. My first impression: Slackware is still Slackware.

Is OpenOffice.org getting faster?

Filed under
OOo

oooninja.com: Some complain OpenOffice.org is slow and bloated. With each release there may be dozens of performance improvements, but there are also new features, some of which may slow things down. This the natural balance in software development, but in the end, what is the net effect on performance from one version to the next?

5 Extensions That I Wish Were Working In Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

maketecheasier.com: One of the feature that makes Firefox a great favorite among users is its huge library of extensions that improved both its functionality and user’s experience. While there are a good number of extensions that are ready for Firefox 3, there are also some of the great add-ons that are not compatible and are sorely missed by many. Here are 5.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Linux kernel compile secrets. Part 2

  • How To Patch Perl 5
  • Use the OR operator in grep to search for words and phrases
  • Clean up Ubuntu Junk Files
  • Best Method To Reboot Remote Linux / Windows / UNIX Server
  • Controlling desktop applications with six degrees of freedom
  • Ubuntu: Disabling Service on Startup
  • removing outdated ssh fingerprints from known_hosts with sed or … ssh-keygen
  • Fedora 9: Fix No Flash Sound Issue with Firefox 3.0

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Compro Technology responds to GPL accusations

  • Multi-Pointer X Merged To X.Org Master
  • Donnie Berkholz speaks with LinuxCrazy
  • Operation OOXML, Part 7 x 10512: The Appeals Arrive
  • Arora, a WebKit browser in Qt
  • Dependence, entitlement, victimhood
  • Linux Users: no MSDN downloads for you
  • GPL-Violations.org and FTF to work more closely together
  • Wikindx facilitates academic writing in a browser
  • Flock is top browser in PC World’s 100 Best Products
  • Open-Source ATI Driver Achieves Major R500 3D Success
  • What is KDE4 meaning to me (parody)
  • Linux green activists unite

Free software vs. software-as-a-service: Is the GPL too weak for the Web?

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: You’ve read the GPL’s preamble, you can name the Four Freedoms, and you do your best to keep proprietary bits off our computers. But what’s the future of free software in the era of Flickr, Google Apps, and Facebook?

Bluewhite64 Linux 12.1 "LiveDVD" just screwed my evening

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: Linux is already the same piece of shit as Windows. Period. Nothing stable. Nothing that would work in the next version. Bluewhite64 Linux 12.1 "LiveDVD" just screwed my evening. The problem is that the previous Bluewhite64 Linux 12.0 "LiveDVD" just worked, and now the 12.1 LiveDVD is a PITA.

OpenSUSE 11 Beta 3

Filed under
SUSE

lazytechguy.com: OpenSUSE 11 Beta 3 marks the end of Beta series of OpenSUSE 11. With final version scheduled to release in 22 days on 19th June 2008; I felt its time to test what is in-store for us. I was specially interested in the KDE4 version and the new installer.

Nonprofit chooses Ubuntu for servers, OpenOffice for desktops

Filed under
Ubuntu

techtarget.com: Oxford Archaeology, one of the largest independent excavation firms in Britain, has twin missions: discovering and preserving historical artifacts that might otherwise be destroyed by construction projects, and sharing its finds and experiences with visitors to increase their appreciation of archaeology and history.

2.6.26-rc4, "Things Are Calming Down"

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "You know the drill by now: another week, another -rc," began Linux creator, Linus Torvalds, announcing the 2.6.26-rc4 kernel. "There's a lot of small stuff in here", he continued, "most people won't even notice. "

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today's leftovers

Red Hat News

Linux Devices

Leftovers: OSS

  • Quantifying Benefits of Network Virtualization in the Data Center
    Modern data centers have increased significantly in scale and complexity as compute and storage resources become highly virtualized. The rise of the DevOps style of application deployment means that data center resources must be agile and respond rapidly to changing workload requirements. Data center network technologies have been challenged to keep up with these rapidly evolving application requirements.
  • Apache Zeppelin Joins Several Other Projects Gaining Top-Level Status
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Only a few days ago, the foundation announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. Now, it has announced that Apache Zeppelin has graduated as well. Zeppelin is a web-based notebook that enables interactive data analytics.
  • 6 Open Source Operating Systems for the Internet of Things (IoT)
    Whether you are small to large enterprises, IoT is one of the useful technology that can help you to be connected on-the-go.
  • 6 open source architecture projects to check out
    The world of architecture doesn't change as quickly as software, but architects are still finding new ways to share innovative designs and ideas. The open source architecture movement aims to make architectural designs, drawings, 3D renderings, and documentation freely available for integration into other projects under open source licenses. It owes much of its growth to the growing popularity of the maker movement, DIY culture, 3D printing, and CNC machines, as well as support from architects like Alejandro Aravana.
  • Yorubaname.com has gone opensource, codebase now on GitHub
    Online dictionary for yoruba names, YorubaName, has now made its backlog accessible to the public. In a post on their blog, the guys at YorubaName announced that the website codebase is now on GitHub.
  • A New Version of Rust Hits the Streets
    Version 1.9 of the Rust programming language has been released. Rust is a new language with a small but enthusiastic community of developers.
  • Here's how you can make a career in OpenStack
    OpenStack is one of the biggest open source movements. It is a free and open-source software platform for cloud computing, mostly deployed as an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). The software platform consists of interrelated components that control hardware pools of processing, storage, and networking resources throughout a data centre. According to the official website, hundreds of the world's largest brands rely on OpenStack to run their businesses every day, reducing costs and helping them move faster. OpenStack has a strong ecosystem globally.
  • Compatibility before purity: Microsoft tweaks .NET Core again [Ed: Microsoft lied about .NET going Open Source; just forked it into Open Core version]
    Microsoft's open source fork of the .NET platform, called .NET Core, will be modified for better compatibility with existing applications, says Program Manager Immo Landwerth in a recent post.
  • EMC Ships Open Source Tool for Cloud and IoT Devices
  • Watch Benjamin Hindman Co-Creator of Apache Mesos Speak Live Tomorrow at MesosCon [Ed: Microsoft proxy in a sense]
  • MesosCon Preview: Q&A with Twitter’s Chris Pinkham
  • How to secure your open source code [Ed: more marketing nonsense of Black Duck]
  • Luxembourg launches open data portal
    The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg officially launched its national open data portal data.public.lu on April 8th. This portal, supported by Digital Luxembourg, the government agency in charge of digital affairs in the country, was presented during the Game of Code hackathon.
  • Denmark to accelerate government digitisation
    Open standards The existing shared solutions are to be adopted by all authorities and public sector institutions where relevant, according to a presentation in English. “Shared solutions need to be stable, secure and user-friendly, they will also be easy to implement because the infrastructure is based on open standards.” The strategy, an agreement involving the government, regions and municipalities, was announced on 12 May. It includes 33 initiatives, which among other things deal with ease of use, reuse of data, IT architecture, growth, security and digital skills, DIGST says.