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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Circuit: The Samsung Galaxy Alpha Challenges The iPhone 6, Asus Challenges Android Wear, and Xiaomi Challenges Everybody Else Rianne Schestowitz 1 17/08/2014 - 6:33pm
Story One interface, many truths Rianne Schestowitz 17/08/2014 - 6:20pm
Story OnePlus One unboxed – What you get and what you don’t get Rianne Schestowitz 17/08/2014 - 6:14pm
Story The elections for the Supplementary wallpapers in Fedora 21 are open! Rianne Schestowitz 17/08/2014 - 6:03pm
Story [ANNOUNCE] Git v2.1.0 Rianne Schestowitz 17/08/2014 - 5:51pm
Story Mageia 5 Might Be the First Distro to Integrate the New KDE Plasma 5 by Default Rianne Schestowitz 17/08/2014 - 5:44pm
Story Android development with Java Rianne Schestowitz 17/08/2014 - 5:39pm
Story Nouveau Works On Maxwell Fan Management Rianne Schestowitz 17/08/2014 - 4:39pm
Blog entry Recent Changes in Tux Machines Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2014 - 3:18pm
Story Konqueror is looking for a maintainer Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2014 - 6:24am

Why Your Boss Wants You to Use Linux

Filed under
Linux
Humor

detector-pro.com: As you “already know” – boss knows the best. If bosses were given to choose an operating system which would be right for their employees, that will be Linux. Here is the reasons:

KDE 4.3 Beta 1: A Short Preview

Filed under
KDE

itnewstoday.com: As a KDE fan myself, I couldn’t wait to try it out. It took a while before Kubuntu packages were made available, however as soon as they were released I jumped on it and installed the beta on my laptop. What did I think of it?

Wii Fit board speaks to Linux

Filed under
Hardware

ostatic.com: One of the best things about technology and its innate hackability (intentional or otherwise) is the endless variety of seemingly mismatched hardware and software that end up working (logically, even) once a hack is finished.

Visual Polish in the Firefox 3.5 Themes

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.mozilla.com/faaborg: We are now in the process of landing a few refreshed icons for the Firefox 3.5 themes. Across all 4 platforms roughly 25 of the icons are either being tweaked or are entirely new (there were some last minute feature additions, like geolocation). Here are a few highlights.

Do we need our own Linux?

Filed under
Linux

manilastandardtoday.com: I downloaded a pre-release version of Bayanihan 5, the upcoming version of the state-sponsored Linux distribution, hoping to put it through its paces. Unfortunately

Why You Want a Dell Mini 10v and not a Dell Mini 10

Filed under
Hardware

blog.ibeentoubuntu: Well, the Dell Mini 10v just came out, and it's cheaper. That's one reason to get it right there.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Linux data backup and recovery strategies

  • Ubuntu Picks Up X Input 2 Support In PPA
  • Infiniband Strikes Back with Help from Linux
  • Announcing first Africa Open Source Fellowship in memory of Guido Sohne
  • Start-up built on free software
  • Geneva to migrate to Ubuntu
  • Got a Linux in the Law Office question?
  • Harvard using Drupal

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Automate Tasks In KDE

  • How to Create a Multi Part Tar File with Linux
  • Use an ISO as if it were a real CD
  • How to Convert RHEL 5 to CentOS 5
  • How to: add features to Firefox with Mozilla's new Jetpack
  • How To Change The Speed Dial Size In Opera

What makes Microsoft a monopoly?

Filed under
Microsoft

rudd-o.com: What makes Microsoft a monopoly is not their market share. It is actually much, much simpler.

The Android Momentum Continues

ostatic.com/blog: In recent weeks, the Android operating system has seen tremendous, encouraging momentum.

Norhtec's Gecko Surfboard -- a Prototype

Filed under
Hardware

blog.ibeentoubuntu: Michael Barnes, the owner of Norhtec, was nice enough to forward some pictures of a rough prototype they're working on -- a PC in a keyboard similar to the eeePC Keyboard PC.

Online Storage Options Compared

Filed under
Software
Web

lunduke.com: Having a local folder that is automatically synced to secure online storage is awesome. Drop a document in a folder. Boom. It’s backed up to a remote server. Which ones offer the best bang for my buck?

Qt vs. GTK: Kopete, KMess, Pidgin and Emesene

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: I’ve mentioned a couple of times that, at least in my opinion, KDE is losing out to GNOME because there simply aren’t as many Qt applications as GTK ones. Competition breeds quality, and as a result, I find Qt applications in general to be inferior.

Justice Rules Police Can't Steal Other Kid's Toys

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Just over a month ago, Breaking News brought LinuxJournal.com readers the story of Riccardo Calixte, the Boston College computer science student targeted by heavy-handed investigators for the capital offense of being a Linux user. Now it's time to update that story.

Gnome desktop overhaul guide

Filed under
Software

thesiliconjungle.wordpress: Gnome is pretty cool. It’s simple and solid. Unfortunately a default Gnome desktop is not very appealing to the eyes. We all come to the point where we wonder, “Can I make my Gnome desktop look super l33t?”

Search engine for Debian sources

Filed under
Linux
Web

h-online.com: Peter De Wachter has created a Debian source code search engine for developers. It lets them find out quickly what files contain, for example, the usb_device structure required for accessing USB devices.

Moblin netbook Linux preview

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Intel's Moblin 2.0 Linux desktop for netbooks is really still too raw to be called a beta, but with a fresh take on what a desktop should be, it's showing great promise.

RMS and His Magic Bread

Filed under
OSS

opendotdotdot.blogspot: One of the reasons I admire RMS is because of his complete integrity and consistency. He simply will not compromise on his principles, even if it leads to the loss of support from those who are not so rigorous.

Operating systems offer some gains

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

washingtontimes.com: I don't know how Charles Darwin would explain it, but imagine that we're each born with an "operating system." For most of us, this inner programming works well, even if it becomes a bit bruised and battered over the years. We adjust and move on.

The Undiscovered Country

Filed under
OSS

h-online.com: In the UK, it's a public holiday, and The H's editor in chief has been watching a movie and wondering if the Star Trek universe is a useful model for the future of open source...

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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