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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story What Happened In Desktop Linux In 2013? Not Much Roy Schestowitz 31/12/2013 - 5:20pm
Story Linux dominates Amazon's Christmas tablet sales Roy Schestowitz 31/12/2013 - 5:14pm
Story Leftovers: Applications Roy Schestowitz 31/12/2013 - 4:04pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 31/12/2013 - 4:03pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 31/12/2013 - 4:03pm
Story Intel Releases A Boatload Of Haswell Documentation Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 10:34pm
Story Chromebooks' success punches Microsoft in the gut Rianne Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 10:34pm
Story CyanogenMod Source Code for Samsung Galaxy Note 3 now available Rianne Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 10:18pm
Story Xubuntu 13.10 - Same again please bartender Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 10:11pm
Story I have no intention of ending my relationships with Linux Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 10:09pm

Mini-Notebook Mania, Part 1

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

pcworld.com: These ultra-compact portables have become hot sellers since Asus introduced its first Eee PC last fall. How do these new ultra-compact laptops differ from traditional models?

Cool stats about Debian bugs

Filed under
Linux

lucas-nussbaum.net: Now that bug #500000 has been reported, let’s have a look at all our other bugs, using UDD.

Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth named as IT Community Hero of the Year

Filed under
Ubuntu

sourcewire.com (PR): CNET Networks UK today announced the winners of the sixth annual UK Business Technology Awards. In one of the most prestigious events in the IT calendar, the finalists were honoured last night at an elite networking dinner, held in London's famous Park Lane Hilton.

Open Source UK's £80m competition

Filed under
OSS

theinquirer.net: THE UK government published its list of 12 approved suppliers of software to schools this afternoon and it did not include Novell. Becta, the education quango that appointed the list, had told them it was looking for firms that could supply both straight and Open Source software.

Linux Foundation personal membership is limited

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: The Linux Foundation has announced a personal membership scheme, allowing community members to join the foundation for $49 and receive a T-shirt and a quarterly newsletter, but the membership privileges are limited.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Track your missing laptop with Adeona

  • on openSUSE handling of hardware changes
  • Keir Thomas on Ubuntu Kung Fu
  • Astrophysicists Rely on Linux to Crunch Data
  • DIRECTV Scores Points in the Linux Community
  • Cinepaint with GTK+2 Widgets on Gentoo…
  • Sun: OpenSolaris 'pretty freaking amazing'
  • The Open Source Contributions of Six Blind Men and an Elephant
  • One more reason for One Laptop Per Child (OLPC)
  • Dell Mini Inspiron 9
  • More Git Madness
  • VDI: Very Disappointed Indeed
  • IBM's New "I.T.Standards Policy" - and a Call for Wider Reform
  • Using LinuxDefender Live To Rescue Your Windows NTFS Drive
  • Will the KDE4 upstream translations be there early enough for Intrepid?
  • Linux: Changing UIDs and GIDs for a user
  • Interview with Johan Thelin (Qt for Embedded Linux)
  • You cannot beat open source
  • How to control the MD5 sum of an ISO image under Windows and under Linux
  • No More Purple Ponies
  • Roll custom social networking sites with Elgg 1.0
  • URGENT NOTIFICATION: major bug in all Mandriva Linux 2009 pre-releases
  • Some Surprises in Novell's Foray Into NAC
  • Linux Plumbers Conference 2008 Keynote Video

Linux does not "need its own Steve Jobs"

Filed under
Linux

the-gay-bar.com: In a break today I found yet another article outlining why "Linux needs its own Steve Jobs for it to be good". We get those quite a lot it's kinda the Top10 list of people with half a brain. Well, here's the final discussion why that idea is wrong (and retarded), so people can stop writing the same article that was wrong back in 1999:

gentoo’s growth

Filed under
Gentoo

wonkabar.org: DistroWatch has yet another “the sky is falling” post about Gentoo, and, going against habit, I’m going to comment on the situation in general.

X.Org 7.4 Finally Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: It's been a hell of a time getting X.Org 7.4 out the door, but this afternoon Adam Jackson has released this long-delayed update to this X system. X.Org 7.4 is arriving after the release of X Server 1.5.1 earlier in the day. Yes, it's finally here!

Also: X Server 1.5.1 Has Been Released
And: Ubuntu X.org work

Firefox 2.0.0.17 and 3.0.2 security updates now available

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: As part of Mozilla Corporation’s ongoing stability and security update process, Firefox 3.0.2 and Firefox 2.0.0.17 are now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux as free downloads.

Also: Lightning and Sunbird 0.9 released

Ubuntu 8.10 "Intrepid Ibex" (Alpha 6): first impressions

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: In a continuing series of articles highlighting that GNU/Linux is a viable replacement operating system, today we're putting the newest release of the popular Ubuntu distribution through its paces.

Linux examined: Xandros Professional

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: To a lot of people, Ubuntu represents the most end-user-friendly nongeek-compatible Linux distribution. But there are other commercial distributions that work even harder to create a desktop experience that is, frankly, Windows-like. The two most well-known of these are Xandros and Linspire (formerly Lindows). Since Xandros recently acquired Linspire, that leaves it pretty much in sole possession of that segment of the marketplace.

10 Command-Line Applications I Use in Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

tux.50webs.org: In this article I'll briefly review ten of my favourite CLI (command-line interface), not necessarily the most popular or most powerful of them. So if you don't find your personal favourite, (e.g. Midnight Commander or mp3blaster), it's because the article includes the tools I use more often.

Ease Linux Deployments With Cobbler

Filed under
Software

enterprisenetworkingplanet.com: As soon as you start administering more than a couple of Linux machines you become aware of two things: You need to be able to reinstall machines quickly and easily, and you need to be able to customize the load of each machine without starting from scratch.

Basler's camera driver works with Linux

Filed under
Software

tmworld.com: Basler Vision Technologies has released a Linux version of its pylon driver package for use with its GigE Vision cameras. All the elements of the Windows driver package can be found in the new Linux version, including the GigE Vision filter driver, C++ camera API, and the pylon viewer application.

Securing your network with PacketFence

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Network access control (NAC) aims to unify endpoint security, system authentication, and security enforcement in a more intelligent network access solution than simple firewalls. NAC ensures that every workstation accessing the network conforms to a security policy and can take remedial actions on workstations if necessary. PacketFence, a free open source NAC application, gives you the security of NAC for free.

Red Hat sets new performance record

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: Once upon a time CIOs bought into open source solely to achieve dramatic cost savings. Today, Red Hat gave them another reason: superior performance.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • A Wic’d Solution

  • Encrypted Private Directory in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Developing with libyui/libzypp & python - part2
  • How to Use more than 3GB RAM on 32-bit Ubuntu
  • Tracking Linux Memory Performance Statistics
  • Command Line Tip - Verify Downloaded Files
  • Try out the Intrepid themes in Hardy
  • Easy Way to Create Simple Linux Packages
  • Print Installed font list with preview for each font
  • Force users to change their passwords upon first login

what does a "KDE app" mean?

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Pet peeve #47: Assuming that "a KDE app" means "you have to be logged into KDE to use it". We run into this misconception fairly regularly and it's time for a re-think.

Chrome fades as users return to IE, Firefox

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com: Chrome's share of the browser market is fading as users who abandoned Internet Explorer and Firefox start to return, an Internet measurement company said today.

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Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.