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Wednesday, 13 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux as a catalyst for a smarter planet

Filed under
Linux

opensource.com: In this morning's Red Hat Summit sessions, Jean Staten Healy and Bob Sutor of IBM presented on the solutions that communities around the world are implementing using Linux as a catalyst for a smarter planet.

WattOS — a lightweight, low-power Linux

Filed under
Linux

fosswire.com: WattOS is a really interesting lightweight Linux distribution that is based on Ubuntu 10.04 (as of WattOS R2). As the name might suggest, it is also focused on low power usage and is said to work well with older and less powerful hardware.

Back When Linux Was Fun

Filed under
Software

ubuntu-user.com: When you're a kid, all you want to do is grow up. When you get old enough to realize that being older isn't all it's cracked up to be. And so it is with Linux.

Kernel Log: Linus resolves to apply a strict policy over merging changes

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Linus Torvalds has resolved to apply a strict policy of accepting only bug fix changes to the kernel after the merge window has closed. Torvalds has also stuck his oar into the debate over the Android suspend block API.

Why Do Open Source Advocates Attack Each Other?

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: Maybe it's a trend, or maybe I just noticed because I was looking, but following my article last week about the strange parallels between Life of Brian and the critics of the Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) movement, there have been a number of similar articles.

Amnesia: The Dark Descent Release Date Revealed

Filed under
Gaming
  • Amnesia: The Dark Descent Release Date Revealed
  • DigitalMan Open Source Game Competition
  • Is LGP Going The Way Of Loki Software?

The Reg guide to Linux, part 2: Preparing to dual-boot

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

theregister.co.uk: On Monday, we suggested Ubuntu as a good starting point for experimenting with desktop Linux. You'll be very pleasantly surprised by the transformation from a lumbering old XP with a fresh install of an OS that doesn't need multiple layers of security software. If you don't have that option, though,

Moving to mandriva?!

Filed under
MDV

blog.lowkster.com: Never thought I would be writing this, but I am actually considering moving my Linux boxes (based mainly in OpenSuSE and Fedoras) to Mandriva!

Also: Mandriva saved by CEO

Is HP Rude To Gnu/Linux Users?

Filed under
Linux

muktware.com: HP has introduced its first all-in-one PC as part of the enterprise-class HP Compaq 6000 Pro family. It is unfortunate that HP doesn't offer Gnu/Linux on these machines.

Old school Linux tips

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

ghacks.net: Some times you just have to pull some tricks out of the vault. These tips can be timeless, classic, or just retro. But generally speaking they still apply to users today. Naturally, since these are mostly old school tips, they are going to be command line tips.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Helping others get Fedora
  • E3 Rage Footage
  • Ubuntu’s vmbuilder Script
  • HOWTO: Use Ubuntu Software Center in Mint 9
  • When Linux Isn't Called Linux
  • tch meego
  • GUI toolkit adds OpenGL support
  • Whoops, X.Org Server 1.9 Gets Another RC Today
  • D.C. launches test of open-source online voting, PR
  • eWeek's Fedora 13 Slideshow
  • ThinkGeek's Best Ever Cease and Desist
  • How to Hide Porn in Linux?
  • TinyMe 2010 Acorn RC 1 Review
  • Binary wallpaper with hidden Fedora message
  • SFLS Episode 0x2A: Waiting for Bilski

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Create a Mail Icon with the GIMP
  • Keep your passwords safe in Linux with KeePassX
  • How to access / mount Windows shares from Linux
  • Tweak Photo Metadata with FotoTagger
  • C++ Pretty Functions
  • How to Find the Most Memory taking process in Ubuntu Linux
  • Increase download speed with Aria2 utility
  • FTP and SFTP Beginners Guide with 10 Examples
  • Install the Banshee Meego Interfact in Ubuntu

Get off your Windows high horse: Try something new

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet.com/blog: The vast majority of students use Windows, with a small selection using Mac’s and a very niche number using a Linux variant. But what good is it if you are going into a working environment and they don’t use the software you’ve always been used to?

2010 Readers' Choice Awards Survey

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: Linux Journal's Readers' Choice Awards offer the opportunity for readers to vote for their Linux and Open Source favorites.

Open Clip Art Library Launches Logo Design Contest

Filed under
OSS

blog.worldlabel.com: From now, until the submission deadline of 11:59p on July 9th, The Open Clip Art Library will be accepting user-created and remixed entries, as a part of the Free Culture Research Conference Logo Design Contest.

WordPress Social Media Optimization in a Nutshell

Filed under
Software

Wordpress is a great platform for SEO — in fact, most of the title and meta optimization is done for you right out of the box. However, that is not the case of social media. Here is a brief list of ways you can use Wordpress to improve the social media optimization of your blog or content site.

Why did I choose to use Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

computer-supports.com: Currently I prefer to use Ubuntu, after I felt the ability to provide Ubuntu Graphical on my laptop, especially Ubuntu 10.04. There are a few that made me feel at home using and choosing Ubuntu Linux operating system, which are as follows:

Marten Mickos says open source doesn't have to be fully open

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: The term "open core" essentially means that the heart of a software project is built on, and remains, open source but added features may not be (particularly a commercial version intended for enterprise use).VC-funded software startups love this model.

User Space File Systems

linux-mag.com: Having file systems in the kernel has its pros and cons. Being able to write file systems in user-space also has some pros and cons, but FUSE (File System in Userspace) allows you to create some pretty amazing results.

openSUSE Linux seeks own direction, more autonomy from Novell

Filed under
SUSE

arstechnica.com: The developers behind openSUSE are drafting a new "community statement" as part of a broader effort to define a technical strategy for their project. The purpose of the community statement is to describe the kind of collaborative environment that the project wants to create as it refines its technical focus.

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More in Tux Machines

Australian Securities Exchange completes Red Hat migration

The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) has completed the migration of "mission-critical" legacy applications to the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). ASX first deployed JBoss EAP in 2011 to modernise its legacy technologies and to facilitate the introduction of new web applications after it realised its legacy application server platform was becoming increasingly inconsistent, unstable, and expensive. After the initial ASX Online Company migration was complete in 2012, ASX used JBoss EAP to build the ASX.com API, as well as its Sharemarket Game, which gives players the opportunity to learn how the share market works. Read more

Programming/Development: GAPID 1.0 and Atom 1.23

  • Diagnose and understand your app's GPU behavior with GAPID
  • GAPID 1.0 Released As Google's Cross-Platform Vulkan Debugger
    Back in March we wrote about GAPID as a new Google-developed Vulkan debugger in its early stages. Fast forward to today, GAPID 1.0 has been released for debugging Vulkan apps/games on Linux/Windows/Android as well as OpenGL ES on Android. GAPID is short for the Graphics API Debugger and allows for analyzing rendering and performance issues with ease using its GUI interface. GAPID also allows for easily experimenting with code changes to see their rendering impact and allows for offline debugging. GAPID has its own format and capturetrace utility for capturing traces of Vulkan (or GLES on Android too) programs for replaying later on with GAPID.
  • Hackable Text Editor Atom 1.23 Adds Better Compatibility for External Git Tools
    GitHub released Atom 1.23, the monthly update of the open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor application loved by numerous developers all over the world. Including a month's worth of enhancements, Atom 1.23 comes with the ability for packages to register URI handler functions, which can be invoked whenever the user visits a URI that starts with "atom://package-name/," and a new option to hide certain commands in the command palette when registering them via "atom.commands.add." Atom 1.23 also improves the compatibility with external Git tools, as well as the performance of the editor by modifying the behavior of several APIs to no longer make callbacks more than once in a text buffer transaction. Along with Atom 1.23, GitHub also released Teletype 0.4.0, a tool that allows developers to collaborate simultaneously on multiple files.

Red Hat GNU/Linux and More

Security: VLC Bug Bounty, Avast Tools, Intel ME

  • European Commission Kicks Off Open-Source Bug Bounty
    The European Commission has announced its first-ever bug bounty program, and is calling on hackers to find vulnerabilities in VLC, a popular open-source multimedia player loaded on every workstation at the Commission. The program has kicked off with a three-week, invitation-only session, after which it will be open to the public. Rewards include a minimum of $2,000 for critical severity bugs, especially remote code execution. High severity bugs such as code execution without user intervention, will start at $750. Medium severity bugs will start at a minimum of $300; these include code execution with user intervention, high-impact crashes and infinite loops. Low-severity bugs, like information leaks, crashes and the like, will pay out starting at $100.
  • Avast launches open-source decompiler for machine code
    Keeping up with the latest malware and virus threats is a daunting task, even for industry professionals. Any device connected to the Internet is a target for being infected and abused. In order to stop attacks from happening, there needs to be an understanding of how they work so that a prevention method can be developed. To help with the reverse engineering of malware, Avast has released an open-source version of its machine-code decompiler, RetDec, that has been under development for over seven years. RetDec supports a variety of architectures aside from those used on traditional desktops including ARM, PIC32, PowerPC and MIPS.
  • Avast makes 'RetDec' machine-code decompiler open source on GitHub
    Today, popular anti-virus and security company, Avast, announces that it too is contributing to the open source community. You see, it is releasing the code for its machine-code decompiler on GitHub. Called "RetDec," the decompiler had been under development since 2011, originally by AVG -- a company Avast bought in 2016.
  • The Intel ME vulnerabilities are a big deal for some people, harmless for most
    (Note: all discussion here is based on publicly disclosed information, and I am not speaking on behalf of my employers) I wrote about the potential impact of the most recent Intel ME vulnerabilities a couple of weeks ago. The details of the vulnerability were released last week, and it's not absolutely the worst case scenario but it's still pretty bad. The short version is that one of the (signed) pieces of early bringup code for the ME reads an unsigned file from flash and parses it. Providing a malformed file could result in a buffer overflow, and a moderately complicated exploit chain could be built that allowed the ME's exploit mitigation features to be bypassed, resulting in arbitrary code execution on the ME. Getting this file into flash in the first place is the difficult bit. The ME region shouldn't be writable at OS runtime, so the most practical way for an attacker to achieve this is to physically disassemble the machine and directly reprogram it. The AMT management interface may provide a vector for a remote attacker to achieve this - for this to be possible, AMT must be enabled and provisioned and the attacker must have valid credentials[1]. Most systems don't have provisioned AMT, so most users don't have to worry about this.