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Wednesday, 18 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 3 ways to contribute to Firefox OS Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 8:55pm
Story Linux Foundation SysAdmin Andy Grimberg Loves New Tech and Snowboarding Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 6:05pm
Story Preview: Benchmarking CentOS 7.0 & Scientific Linux 7.0 Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 5:53pm
Story LXLE 14.04 review – new paradigms Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 5:46pm
Story Samsung Nixes Knox: The Android Security Saga Continues Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 5:42pm
Story On Plasma 5 Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 5:35pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.14.12 LTS Brings Updated Nouveau and Radeon Drivers Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 1:32pm
Story The future of realtime Linux in doubt Roy Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 12:16pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.4.98 LTS Brings Updated Wireless Drivers and Better PowerPC Support Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 12:04pm
Story CentOS 7 GNOME Live CD Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 12:02pm

RMS on Amazon's "Swindle"

Filed under
OSS

opendotdotdot.blogspot: As you've probably seen, there is concern over Amazon's plans to pull the text-to-voice capability of the Kindle e-book reader, because of misguided pressure from authors groups in the US.

Open Source 2009: It’s the Economy, Stupid. Or is it?

Filed under
OSS

linux-mag.com: About a week before attending the Open Source Business Conference last month, I heard an interview on public radio with the founder of Good News Network, a web site dedicated to reporting nothing but — you guessed it — good news.

Impi Linux is no more

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: Five years after it was first launched, South Africa’s Impi Linux distribution no longer exists.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Firefox 3.5 beta 4 due next week

  • Mozilla Developer News 4/14
  • Should Sun buy Novell?
  • No, Sun should not buy Novell
  • Novell Unveils Service-Driven Data Centre Plan
  • Novell ZENworks
  • openSUSE on Netbooks at FOSDEM 2009
  • How To Take (Yet Another) Beating
  • SFLS - Episode 0x0B: Thoughts on the TomTom Settlement
  • Linux Foundation bows to RMS
  • Stallman discusses Free Software and GPLv3
  • Linux summit surprises
  • Open source and the mythical man month
  • Channelling the Power of Open Source
  • Training: The Missing Link in Business Adoption of Open Source?
  • Memo to Canonical: Follow Red Hat’s Partner Lead
  • Benefits of Ubuntu Server Edition
  • First update for Debian 5.0 "Lenny" released
  • Pclinuxos 2009
  • Linux Migration for the Home PC User, Part 2
  • Android Shmandroid. Who Cares?
  • Having Fun With Other Solaris Sys Admins
  • Things shouldn't always be wiped
  • PulseAudio 0.9.15 Brings Major Improvements
  • GNOME PackageKit updates
  • Compiz is getting rapidly sick of Gnome

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Run Windows applications on top of Linux desktop with Seamless Mode in VirtualBox

  • 10 step move Kmail to Outlook
  • Understanding Sticky Windows
  • Sort CLI output by line length
  • sometimes, grep alone is enough
  • error: failed to commit transaction (conflicting files)
  • Concatenate pairs of lines
  • How To Turn Off Your Monitor Via Command Line
  • Connect to a WEP network via command line
  • Arch Linux running the latest kernel

New Attack Sneaks Rootkits Into Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

darkreading.com: Kernel rootkits are tough enough to detect, but now a researcher has demonstrated an even sneakier method of hacking Linux.

SLED 11: a distro for businesses, not idealists

Filed under
SUSE

theregister.co.uk: SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED) is perhaps best known as the distro whose owner Novell, in 2005, signed an extremely unpopular patent-protection deal with Microsoft. From that moment on, Novell was essentially dead to those that prize the free software aspects of Linux.

Should BC Linux users be looking over their shoulders?

Filed under
Linux

eff.org: Aside from the remarkable overreach by campus and state police in trying to paint a student as suspicious in part because he can navigate a non-Windows computer environment, nothing cited in the warrant application could possibly constitute the cited criminal offenses.

10 Best Audio Editors for Linux

Filed under
Software

techcityinc.com: I’ve compiled a list of some of the most useful Audio applications you can download totally free of charge for Linux.

Bulgarian distro offers Live CD greatest hits

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: A Bulgarian open source project has released a Live CD compilation of five popular boot-and-run Linux distributions.

New Open Source Linux Viewer

Filed under
Software

nwn.blogs.com: This eye-catching, remarkably vivid demo video shows off a Linux SL viewer built by renowned coder Opensource Obscure, using the "render-pipeline" from Linden Lab's code branch. It was so impressive, I got in touch with Obscure, for more details.

Intel wants to co-develop the GCC

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: Three Intel employees are to contribute to the development of the GNU Compiler Collection. It wouldn't be the first open source project to be supported by the giants.

The Digital Tipping Point: Free film made with free tools

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org/blogs: Christian Einfeldt is producing a documentary movie called the Digital Tipping Point about how free software is changing global culture. He is releasing all of his footage under a free license, and is inviting participants to grab the video and use it to tell stories.

SUSE Linux Enterprise 11

Filed under
SUSE

tuxradar.com: Striking new features are the Compiz Fusion 3D compositing window manager, KDE 4.0, Gnome 2.24 and a redesigned installer, but Mono-haters won't be happy to see the large amount of Microsoft .NET software that ships as standard.

5 BitTorrent Clients for Linux

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: Today I will continue the series of GUI applications reviews with 5 clients for the BitTorrent protocol.

Creating Reports in OpenOffice.org Base

Filed under
OOo
HowTos

linuxjournal.com: Let's face it, databases are only minimally human-readable. In fact, to anybody who's not an accountant or a computer geek, reading databases can be downright intimidating. However, this limitation is partially compensated by the fact that reports in Base are quick and easy to create and are displayed and printed in Writer.

Linux gets reseller friendly

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: I was happy to see that SYNNEX, a leading software and hardware distributor, had partnered up with Red Hat to form the Open Source Channel Alliance. It may just be what's needed.

Mint 6 “Fluxbox” Mini-Review, Desktop Emphasis

Filed under
Linux

superphysics.awardspace: By now, I have tested many Linux distros. But I had yet to come across any distro that actually did better in VMware then on actual hardware. Until now.

Why Microsoft won round one of netbook wars

Filed under
Hardware

blogs.zdnet.com: Free is not the lowest possible price. If you want to get sell-through at retail, you have to support the product with collateral materials, with ads, with sales training and support.

Dell Inspiron Mini 9 Netbook

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: While there are many netbooks on the market from a variety of different vendors, for the most part they are composed of the same hardware. When it comes to Dell with their popular Inspiron Mini 9 netbook, they happen to be using Ubuntu but with a few modifications.

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More in Tux Machines

The Fairphone 2 Running Ubuntu Will Be On Show at MWC17

Mobile World Congress 2017 kicks off next month, and Canonical is, once again, going to be in attendance. But although there are unlikely to be any shiny new Ubuntu phones and tablets to show off, Ubuntu Touch won’t be entirely absent. Read more

Linux Devices, Raspberry Pi, and Tizen

  • Rugged, customizable POS system runs on Braswell
    Advantech’s rugged “UBX-310D” POS computer offers a quad-core, 2.0GHz Celeron J1900, plus SATA, mSATA, and mini-PCIe. Advantech’s UBX-310D is a fanless point of sale computer intended for small countertops and limited-space installations. The shock and vibration resistant device has a modest, 245 x 185 x 45mm footprint. The system runs Windows 7 or 8 as a default, with optional Linux 3.13, and supports applications such as retail, self-service, digital signage, and store management.
  • Open spec, $29 COM shrinks Pine A64 to SODIMM dimensions
    Pine64’s open spec, 67.9 x 31mm “SoPine A64” COM has a quad-core -A53 Allwinner A64 and 2GB RAM, plus an optional baseboard that mimics a Pine A64+ SBC.
  • RetroPie, NES Classic and Bluetooth peripherals
    I wanted to write a more in-depth post about RetroPie the Retro Gaming Appliance OS for Raspberry Pis, either technically or more positively, but unfortunately I don't have much positive to write. What I hoped for was a nice appliance that I could use to play old games from the comfort of my sofa. Unfortunately, nine times out of ten, I had a malfunctioning Linux machine and the time I'd set aside for jumping on goombas was being spent trying to figure out why bluetooth wasn't working. I have enough opportunities for that already, both at work and at home. I feel a little bad complaining about an open source, volunteer project: in its defence I can say that it is iterating fast and the two versions I tried in a relatively short time span were rapidly different. So hopefully a lot of my woes will eventually be fixed. I've also read a lot of other people get on with it just fine. Instead, I decided the Nintendo Classic NES Mini was the plug-and-play appliance for me. Alas, it became the "must have" Christmas toy for 2016 and impossible to obtain for the recommended retail price. I did succeed in finding one in stock at Toys R Us online at one point, only to have the checkout process break and my order not go through. Checking Stock Informer afterwards, that particular window of opportunity was only 5 minutes wide. So no NES classic for me!
  • Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Extends IoT
    Raspberry Pi Foundation updates embedded Compute Module with faster ARM processor to help developers and businesses build new IoT devices. The Raspberry Pi Foundation announced its new Compute Module 3 (CM3) on Jan. 16, providing internet of things (IoT) device makers with a powerful new option for embedded compute capabilities. The CM3 should not be confused with the Raspberry Pi's namesake device, which had its last major update in February 2016 with the debut of the Raspberry Pi 3 device. The Raspberry Pi is a small form-factor ARM-powered computer that was originally developed in 2012 as a way to help both kids and adults learn about computer science.
  • Smartphone App: Saavn Music app hits the Tizen Store
    Saavn Music app, which lets you listen to music online, is now available on your Tizen Store via Openmobile World Wide Inc. Previously Indian Z2 smartphone users got JioMusic app for it’s 4G & Jio support feature. Now, the online music Saavn app is available for the Samsung Z1 & Z3, as well as the Samsung Z2.

Debian News (manpages and TeX Live)

  • manpages.debian.org has been modernized (2017-01-18)
    https://manpages.debian.org has been modernized! We have just launched a major update to our manpage repository. What used to be served via a CGI script is now a statically generated website, and therefore blazingly fast. While we were at it, we have restructured the paths so that we can serve all manpages, even those whose name conflicts with other binary packages (e.g. crontab(5) from cron, bcron or systemd-cron). Don’t worry: the old URLs are redirected correctly.
  • Debian/TeX Live January 2017
    As the freeze of the next release is closing in, I have updated a bunch of packages around TeX: All of the TeX Live packages (binaries and arch independent ones) and tex-common. I might see whether I get some updates of ConTeXt out, too.

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • Secure your Elasticsearch cluster and avoid ransomware
    Last week, news came out that unprotected MongoDB databases are being actively compromised: content copied and replaced by a message asking for a ransom to get it back. As The Register reports: Elasticsearch is next. Protecting access to Elasticsearch by a firewall is not always possible. But even in environments where it is possible, many admins are not protecting their databases. Even if you cannot use a firewall, you can secure connection to Elasticsearch by using encryption. Elasticsearch by itself does not provide any authentication or encryption possibilities. Still, there are many third-party solutions available, each with its own drawbacks and advantages.
  • Resolve to Follow These 8 Steps for Better Data Security in 2017
    Getting physically fit is a typical New Year's resolution. Given that most of us spend more time online than in a gym, the start of the new year also might be a great time to improve your security “fitness.” As with physical fitness challenges, the biggest issue with digital security is always stagnation. That is, if you don't move and don't change, atrophy sets in. In physical fitness, atrophy is a function of muscles not being exercised. In digital fitness, security risks increase when you fail to change passwords, update network systems and adopt improved security technology. Before long, your IT systems literally become a “sitting duck.” Given the volume of data breaches that occurred in 2016, it is highly likely that everyone reading this has had at least one breach of their accounts compromised in some way, such as their Yahoo data account. Hackers somewhere may have one of the passwords you’ve used at one point to access a particular site or service. If you're still using that same password somewhere, in a way that can connect that account to you, that's a non-trivial risk. Changing passwords is the first of eight security resolutions that can help to improve your online security fitness in 2017. Click through this eWEEK slide show to discover the rest.
  • Pwn2Own 2017 Takes Aim at Linux, Servers and Web Browsers
    10th anniversary edition of Pwn2Own hacking contest offers over $1M in prize money to security researchers across a long list of targets including Virtual Machines, servers, enterprise applications and web browsers. Over the last decade, the Zero Day Initiative's (ZDI) annual Pwn2Own competition has emerged to become one of the premiere events on the information security calendar and the 2017 edition does not look to be any different. For the tenth anniversary of the Pwn2Own contest, ZDI, now owned and operated by Trend Micro, is going farther than ever before, with more targets and more prize money available for security researchers to claim by successfully executing zero-day exploits.
  • 'Factorio' is another game that was being hit by key scammers
    In another case of scammers trying to buy keys with often stolen credit cards to sell on websites like G2A, the developers of 'Factorio' have written about their experience with it (and other stuff too).