Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 23 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OSS Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2015 - 1:41pm
Story Building enterprise data applications with open source components Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2015 - 1:29pm
Story OSS Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2015 - 8:17am
Story today's leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2015 - 7:32am
Story Leftovers: Reviews/Screenshots Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2015 - 7:30am
Story Containers, Nginx, and Server Issues Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2015 - 7:29am
Story Kernel News Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2015 - 7:28am
Story OSS Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2015 - 7:20am
Story Leftovers: Security Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2015 - 7:15am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2015 - 7:12am

RHEL 6: serious Linux built for growth

Filed under
Linux Red Hat has released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, the first major update for RHEL in over three years.

Raaaaaaawwwhide! (rolling rolling rolling)

Filed under
Linux A couple of days back I decided a week was plenty long enough to be running a boring, stable OS like Fedora 14 on my desktop and decided to upgrade it to Rawhide instead.

8 Alternative PDF Readers For Your Consideration

Filed under
Software Linux users, regardless which distro you are using, it bound to come with a default PDF reader that you can use to read PDF files. If you are yearning for a better (or faster) PDF reader, here are several options for you.

KDEPIM 4.5 is Dead -- Here's to KDEPIM 4.6

Filed under
KDE So... we have decided that there is no point to putting any more effort into the long-awaited KDEPIM 4.5.

Debian 5

Filed under
Linux I’ve written a lot of reviews of distros based on Debian, but never a review of Debian itself. So this time around I decided to look at Debian 5 (Lenny).

Adventures in Kubuntu: Throwing in the towel

Filed under
Ubuntu Regular visitors have already read about my ongoing experiment with Kubuntu. To recap, I’m a little worried about where Gnome is going, and want to be ready to switch desktop environments if need be. So I installed kubuntu-desktop over an existing Ubuntu.

It was 20 years ago today

Filed under
  • Web celebrates one of its 20th birthdays
  • 20 Years Ago, The Web’s Founders Ask for Funding

Quick look at Scientific Linux 6.0 Alpha

Filed under

all-things-linux.blogspot: I was meaning to write this yesterday and before you know, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.0 final is out. But that doesn't mean we can't post a quick look at this one.

MariaDB 5.2 now faster and with alternative authentication

Filed under
Software Launched by MySQL creator Michael "Monty" Widenius, the MariaDB MySQL fork has been released for downloading as version 5.2. The open source database is based on MySQL 5.1.51, although MariaDB contains additional functions.

Red Hat’s Secret Patent Deal

Filed under
Legal When patent troll Acacia sued Red Hat in 2007, it ended with a bang: Acacia’s patents were invalidated by the court, and all software developers, open-source or not, had one less legal risk to cope with. So, why is the outcome of Red Hat’s next tangle with Acacia being kept secret?

Did Ubuntu disrespect Fedora Linux with openrespect?

Filed under
Ubuntu is founded by Ubuntu Linux community manager Jono Bacon, as a way to encourage mutual respect across Linux distributions. Apparently though that mutual respect didn't fully extend to Red Hat's community Fedora Linux distribution.

Hexen: Edge of Chaos Demo

Filed under
Gaming The Hexen: Edge of Chaos demo has been released for Doom 3 owners.

Fedora Plans For Wayland

Filed under
Software Wayland's not a usable default yet. It'll probably be packaged in F15 as something you can play with. We don't even have a complete list of transition criteria yet, let alone a timeframe.

Jolicloud's OS Isn't Just Similar to Chrome OS--Looks Like It Will Run With It

Filed under
OS Like Chrome OS, the Jolicloud OS is focused entirely on managing cloud-based applications as opposed to local ones (see the screenshot below). Its other similarity to Chrome OS is that it is squarely aimed at the netbook market.

UNR 10.10 Maverick Meerkat - Don't touch this!

Filed under
Ubuntu After being tremendously pleased with Maverick, as it ran superbly on both standard PC and even Mac, and loving the UNR 10.04 Lucid on my eeePC netbook, I figured Maverick Netbook Remix edition could only be a doubly double win for me. And so I tried it.

Keeping Red Hat in Raleigh a constant fight

Filed under
  • Keeping Red Hat in Raleigh a constant fight – Szulik
  • Red Hat tries the value argument for open source

Linux Mint 10 “Julia” released

Filed under
Linux The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 10.

Keeping up with the Unitys: KDE's Plasma Netbook

Filed under
KDE Last week when I wrote about Canonical’s decision to go with Unity on Wayland I mentioned traditional desktop interfaces are mostly unsuitable for more mobile computers, including tablets, phones and netbooks. I should have been more specific.

The Difference Engine: Linux's Achilles heel

Filed under
Ubuntu As for Linux, he has tried most of the popular distributions over the years, and has settled, for the time being, on Ubuntu to dish out files over the network, and Linux Mint as a desktop client for testing software.

Unity, the next generation desktop?

Filed under

wamukota.blogspot: Simply speaking, Unity is another visual representation to allow easy access to your installed programs. Compared to launching an application by using a keyboard shortcut, a menu entry, a docky/cairo/... dock icon or a graphical shortcut on the desktop, Unity uses a launchbar glued to left side of the screen plus a graphical menu where all applications are displayed as icons. Gone are the classic menus. Is this something to be afraid of?

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Linux More Popular than Windows in Stack Overflow's 2018 Developer Survey
    Stack Overflow, the largest and most trusted online community for developers, published the results of their annual developer survey, held throughout January 2018. More than 100,000 developers participated in this year's Annual Developer Survey, which included several new topics ranging from ethics in coding to artificial intelligence (AI). The results are finally here and reveal the fact that some technologies and operating systems have become more popular than others in the past year.
  • History of containers
    I’ve researched these dates several times now over the years, in preparation for several talks. So I’m posting it here for my own future reference.
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E03 – The Three Musketeers - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Best Desktop Environment
    Thanks to its stability, performance, feature set and a loyal following, the K Desktop Environment (KDE) won Best Desktop Environment in this year's Linux Journal Readers' Choice Awards.
  • Renata D'Avila: Pushing a commit to a different repo
    My Outreachy internship with Debian is over. I'm still going to write an article about it, to let everyone know what I worked on towards the ending, but I simply didn't have the time yet to sit down and compile all the information.

Software: GTK-VNC, GNOME Shell and More

Devices: Mintbox Mini, NanoNote (Part 3), MV3

  • Mintbox Mini 2: Compact Linux desktop with Apollo Lake quad-core CPU
    The Mintbox Mini 2 is a fanless computer that measures 4.4″ x 3.3″ x 1.3″ and weighs about 12 ounces. It’s powered by a 10W Intel Celeron J3455 quad-core processor.
  • Linux Mint ditches AMD for Intel with new Mintbox Mini 2
    While replacing Windows 10 with a Linux-based operating system is a fairly easy exercise, it shouldn’t be necessary. Look, if you want a computer running Linux, you should be able to buy that. Thankfully you can, as companies like System76 and Dell sell laptops and desktops with Ubuntu or Ubuntu-based operating systems. Another option? Buy a Mintbox! This is a diminutive desktop running Linux Mint — an Ubuntu-based OS. Today, the newest such variant — The Mintbox Mini 2 — makes an appearance. While the new model has several new aspects, the most significant is that the Linux Mint Team has switched from AMD to Intel (the original Mini used an A4-Micro 6400T).
  • Porting L4Re and Fiasco.OC to the Ben NanoNote (Part 3)
    So, we find ourselves in a situation where the compiler is doing the right thing for the code it is generating, but it also notices when the programmer has chosen to do what is now the wrong thing. We must therefore track down these instructions and offer a supported alternative. Previously, we introduced a special configuration setting that might be used to indicate to the compiler when to choose these alternative sequences of instructions: CPU_MIPS32_R1. This gets expanded to CONFIG_CPU_MIPS32_R1 by the build system and it is this identifier that gets used in the program code.
  • Linux Software Enables Advanced Functions on Controllers
    At NPE2018, SISE presents its new generation of multi-zone controllers (MV3). Soon, these controllers will be able to control as many as 336 zones. They are available in five sizes (XS, S, M, L and XL) with three available power cards (2.5 A, 15 A and 30 A). They are adaptable to the packaging, automotive, cosmetics, medical and technical-parts markets.

Linux Foundation: Microsoft Openwashing,, OCP, Kernel Commits Statistics

  • More Tips for Managing a Fast-Growing Open Source Project [Ed: Microsoft has infiltrated the Linux Foundation so deeply and severely that the Foundation now regularly issues openwashing pieces for the company that attacks Linux]
  • improves Kubernetes networking in sixth software release, one of Linux Foundation’s open source projects, has introduced its 18.01 software release with a focus on improving Kubernetes Networking, Istio and cloud native NFV.
  • Bolsters Kubernetes, NFV, and Istio Support With Latest Release
    The Fast Data Project ( released its sixth update since its inception within the Linux Foundation two years ago. While the update list is extensive, most are focused on Kubernetes networking, cloud native network functions virtualization (NFV), and Istio.
  • Linux Foundation, OCP collaborate on open sourcing hardware and software
    The virtualization of network functions has resulted in a disaggregation of hardware and software, increasing interest in open source projects for both layers in return. To feed this interest, the Linux Foundation and Open Compute Project (OCP) recently announced a joint initiative to advance the development of software and hardware-based open source networking. Both organizations have something to offer the other through the collaboration. The Linux Foundation’s OPNFV project integrates OCP as well as other open source software projects into relevant network functions virtualization (NFV) reference architectures. At the same time, OCP offers an open source option for the hardware layer.
  • Kernel Commits with "Fixes" tag
    Over the past 5 years there has been a steady increase in the number of kernel bug fix commits that use the "Fixes" tag.  Kernel developers use this annotation on a commit to reference an older commit that originally introduced the bug, which is obviously very useful for bug tracking purposes. What is interesting is that there has been a steady take-up of developers using this annotation: