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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Asus Slaps Linux in the Face? - Not!

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • Asus Slaps Linux in the Face? - Not!

  • "It's better with Windows" Website -- Hoax or Just Ugly?
  • Why It's Better With Windows...
  • Linux Netbook Reviews: What The Wall Street Journal Missed
  • Moblin version of Linpus Linux Lite OS at Computex

Nettop goes Nano

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Shuttle has released a fanless mini-PC using Via's 1.0GHz Nano U1700 processor. The Shuttle XS29F is said to feature both VGA and DVI video outputs, up to 4GB of RAM, SATA 2 storage options, four USB ports, and total power consumption of less than 50 Watts.

Who wants a pony ?

Filed under
Software

kushaldas.in: Pony is a simple image manager written in PyKDE4. After looking for few days I decided to write my own image manager which can suite properly with the simple workflow I follow.

Review - Fedora 11 Preview

Filed under
Linux

planetoss.com: RedHat introduces all the exiting new technologies in Fedora, the community driven distribution. Fedora 11 will have the following features besides package version upgrades.

Also: Fedora 11 due for release next Tuesday

Harvard study: Linux will not supplant Windows

Filed under
Linux

news.cnet.com: For those waiting for a grand cataclysmic battle between Gog (Linux) and Magog (Windows), with one supreme victor, don't hold your breath, suggests a new study by Harvard Business School.

Linux 2.6.30 Kernel Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: With the Linux 2.6.30 kernel being prepped for release in early June, we have set out to provide a few benchmarks of this latest Linux kernel to see how it compares to its two earlier predecessors.

KOffice 2.0.0 Released

Filed under
Software

kde.org: The KOffice team is extremely pleased to finally announce version 2.0.0 of KOffice. This release marks the end of more than 3 years of work to port KOffice to Qt 4 and the KDE 4 libraries and, in some cases, totally rewrite the engine of the KOffice applications.

Elisa Media Center Gets a New Look and a New Name

Filed under
Software

ibeentoubuntu.com: Elisa Media Center has been one of those projects that I really want to like and has almost been there for a long time. It did a lot of cool stuff and did it simply. Well, Elisa has a new name, a new website, and a completely new look.

Another superb collection of Linux games

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: Dear all, we have already had several articles on Linux gaming, including three chapters on First Person Shooters (FPS) covering eight games and two massive compilations containing tens of great titles. For today, I have prepared another interesting collection, with a bit of everything.

KOffice on version 2.0, extensions, and being like Firefox

Filed under
Software
Interviews

computerworld.com.au: The idea of an application that supports third-party extensions and add-ons users can download and install in one click may be more applicable to Web browsers than office suites, but the developers at the open source KOffice project have developed such an architecture where all components are modular.

Netbook Wars: Linux, Android, Windows

Filed under
Linux
  • Netbook Wars: Linux, Android, Windows 7

  • Little Laptops With Linux Have Compatibility Issues
  • HP carries the Linux torch with new Mini 110

Using iSCSI On Fedora 10 (Initiator And Target)

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Fedora 10. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Tuxradar Podcast Season 1 Episode 9

  • Linux Outlaws 94 - Beer on the Stream
  • Elastix - an amazing GNU/Linux distribution to set up an Asterix-based PBX
  • Mozilla: Firefox 3.5 RC1 ready to roll in 48 hours
  • Linux The New Choice for the Hospitality POS
  • Virtual Nation
  • Rwanda: Country to Host OLPC Learning Centre for Africa
  • OLPC kickstarts notebook program for indigenous children
  • OLPC boosts outback education with laptop deployment
  • NYSE Euronext CIO to Deliver Keynote at 2009 Red Hat Summit
  • Is This the Tipping Point for Open Source “in the Channel”?
  • Source code as a safeguard
  • Who wants Linux with sex appeal? Not this guy.
  • Current Status of Administrator Mode in System Settings in KDE 4
  • ZaReason Preparing Ubuntu Server, Netbook
  • Development bundles as the new open source paradigm
  • Why Windows Netbooks are good for Open Source
  • Drupal 7: next steps for usability
  • X.Org 7.5 Release Schedule Slips Again
  • Funny Linux Picture - Strong Arming The Market

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Linux: Find large files

  • How To Restore Automatic Update Notification Icon In Ubuntu 9.04
  • Strip Mono from Ubuntu and prevent it to come back
  • Remove The Pop-Up Update Manager
  • How to find out how long a process has been running (elapsed time)
  • Listing initrd content with lsinitrd
  • Six articles that will teach you more about Open Source
  • Installing new templates in OpenOffice 3

Linux Mint 7 "Gloria" Keeps Getting Better

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Mint 7 "Gloria" - It Just Keeps Getting Better

  • Gloria
  • 10 Top apps to add to LinuxMint7 Gloria

SELinux vs AppArmor vs Grsecurity

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

cyberciti.biz: Linux kernel is the central component of Linux operating systems. It is responsible for managing the system's resources, the communication between hardware and software and security. Unfortunately, stock kernel is not secured out of box. There are some important Linux kernel patches to secure your box. They differ significantly.

Why is Ubuntu 9.40 (Jaunty) Not LTS?

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntulinuxhelp.com: "Why is Jaunty not an LTS release, shouldn't I just stay with Hardy?" That's a question I received from one of my clients.

Pimp up your Terminal with Guake and Yakuake

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: If you're wondering whether Guake and Yakuake are Polynesian happy mushrooms, you're a bit off mark. These are Linux command line terminals, modified to behave like the console in the popular First Person Shooter (FPS) Quake. Hence, the funny names.

SouthEast LinuxFest: Be There

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: Only 16 days remain until June 13th, the date SouthEast LinuxFest makes its debut in Clemson, South Carolina. The one-day conference features an impressive list of speakers.

Hands on: Google Chromium browser alpha for Linux

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The open source Chromium project, which serves as the basis for Google's Chrome web browser, has reached alpha status on the Linux platform. Ars takes a look at the Linux port's progress and functionality.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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