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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 28 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/08/2014 - 10:42pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 28/08/2014 - 10:42pm
Story Linux on the desktop isn't dead Roy Schestowitz 28/08/2014 - 10:30pm
Story KDE Mover-Sizer brings handy Linux desktop tricks to the PC Roy Schestowitz 28/08/2014 - 10:26pm
Story 2014 Kernel Internship Report (OPW) Rianne Schestowitz 28/08/2014 - 9:50pm
Story Watch: "JavaScript: If you love it, set it free" Roy Schestowitz 28/08/2014 - 9:47pm
Story Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) beta-1 released! Rianne Schestowitz 28/08/2014 - 9:39pm
Story Device Tree Overlay Support Lands Upstream Rianne Schestowitz 28/08/2014 - 9:34pm
Story It’s All Linux Under the Hood Rianne Schestowitz 28/08/2014 - 9:21pm
Story Another Intel Linux Power Regression Is Being Investigated Rianne Schestowitz 28/08/2014 - 9:05pm

Accessing your favorite media via the terminal

Filed under
Software
HowTos

ubuntumagazine.net: This article is touches upon learning how to leverage some of the real power of Linux via the terminal. The terminal gives you full control of everything behind the scenes.

Hands on with blazingly quick Firefox 3.5

Filed under
Moz/FF

nbr.co.nz: Mozilla Corp. has delayed the release candidate of Firefox 3.5 from this week ‘til next, but NBR's tests reveal it'll be worth the wait - this fox is blazingly fast.

Ubuntu, almost two weeks in

Filed under
Ubuntu

wttf.blogspot: Well, the laptop has been running Ubuntu Studio 9.06 (64bit) for almost two weeks and so far the verdict is: Bye-Bye Vista!

Fun Linux Wallpapers

Filed under
Software

howtogeek.com: Yeah, it's a little ironic that we'd put together a collection of Linux wallpapers since we cover mostly Microsoft topics—but we're also fans of open-source goodness and use Linux all the time.

Review: Linux Mint 7

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Linux Mint is one of those distributions that not only has a big parent, and an even bigger grandparent, but it's also a distribution that has always improved, and never failed to impress. But everything that goes up must at some point come down.

KDE 4.3 Beta 2 Out

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: The KDE release train continues to roll, delivering another beta release of KDE 4.3 to you today. The effort has shifted towards increasing stability and adding polish to the codebase so our users will find a well-working KDE 4.3.0 on their desktops when it is released in late July.

Linux Kernel 2.6.30 released

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: After eight release candidates and a rather short development cycle, Linus Torvalds has released Linux version 2.6.30, dubbed "Man-Eating Seals of Antiquity".

Also: What's new in Linux 2.6.30

Linux Troubleshooting Guide: Fix the Most Common Problems

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

maximumpc.com: Troubleshooting has always been one of the most frustrating aspects of computer ownership. Due to the practically infinite number of potential problems, it would be utterly impossible to write a how-to guide to fix all of them, but in this article we are going to address some of the most common problems.

Another Site Shuns GNU/Linux Users

Filed under
Web

riplinton.blogspot: I have used MapsOnUs for years to map out my trips. Recently I started getting a message, that my browser is not supported.

First Linux USB 3.0 drivers emerge

Filed under
Software

linuxpromagazine.com: After a year-and-a-half's worth of work, Intel hacker Sarah Sharp announced that Linux will be the first operating system supporting USB 3.0.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 75

  • Do We Need an Apps Store for GNU/Linux?
  • Looking Forward to Central America Open-Source Software Festival
  • SFLC - Episode 0x0F: Your Questions
  • Dell Bundling Open Source Applications for SMBs
  • Fedora 11 leaps into filesystem unknown
  • What’s in a Linux Name?
  • First space storm seen impacting above Earth
  • Fedora 11 Delivers Big Feature Boost
  • Asus WL-138g V2
  • Getting to the root of Ubuntu
  • Google I/O Foretells the Future of the Internet
  • 5 disadvantages of Linux
  • Fedora 11 Launches with New Community Portal Project
  • New installs
  • OpenSolaris for embedded systems
  • Ubuntu censoring rap
  • What's Noteworthy in Linux, BSD, OS X & Windows in 2010?
  • Mozilla Developer News June 9
  • Giving Control (Gentoo Use Flags)
  • Microcore and Qemu
  • Novell's open-source app store: We've heard this one before
  • Moblin on the Nettop - First Steps

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Wipe Deleted Files with dd

  • Tuxguitar and Ubuntu Tip
  • Use tabs to open multiple files in vim
  • Setting Up Arch Linux
  • Install Boxee in Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty x86_64
  • HOWTO Share Directories via NFS -Gentoo
  • Linux Tips: Modify ctrl-alt-del behavior
  • Joining Gentoo Servers to Active Directory
  • Netbook Broadcom (43xx) Cards with Debian Lenny
  • Explain Linux TCP Wrappers
  • Integrate Firefox 3 and KDE 4
  • IPTables Tips
  • Setting up a Proftp server
  • How to add additional swap area in SuSe/openSUSE
  • Linux Tips
  • Ubuntu 9.04 Tip Round-up

Ubuntu vs. Kubuntu - A Linux Lover’s Challenge

Filed under
Software

techexposures.com: Both Ubuntu and Kubuntu are based on the same cannonical distribution and core. The only (and important) difference between them is the desktop environment offered with either option.

CrunchBang Linux is best for old notebook

Filed under
Linux

linux.bihlman.com: I tried to get Puppy Linux installed on my old Presario notebook PC but I just couldn’t get the install to take. That gave me a good excuse to try another distro, and I’m glad I did!

Linux: I take it back

Filed under
Linux

dwasifar.com: Regular readers will remember quite a few posts in which Your Humble Narrator complains about this, that, or the other flaw in desktop Linux in general or an Ubuntu distribution in particular. Well, I take it all back.

Linux-Based Cell Phone Netbook Dream Machine

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxtoday: I don't like cell phones. iPhone? Don't make me laugh. Blackberry and other smartphones? Close. I want Nice Inexpensive Linux Netbooks That Do Everything.

Automotive gauge cluster design runs Linux

linuxdevices.com: Automotive telematics display firm Yazaki North America announced an instrument cluster display based on embedded Linux, designed for reconfigurable dashboard TFT/LCD displays.

SquashFS: Not Just for Embedded Systems

linux-mag.com: Who knew that compression could be so useful in file systems? SquashFS, typically used for embedded systems, can be a great fit for laptops, desktops and, yes, even servers.

NVIDIA ION Linux Performance

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: NVIDIA's ION platform is designed to provide superior graphics performance and quality than what is available with the Intel 945 graphics that up to this point were all that was available in Atom-based products.

Ubuntu Is Driving Me Away

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxcanuck.wordpress: I have used Ubuntu exclusively since Feisty and have tested each new release from alpha on. I have always been a big booster of Ubuntu and am active on several help forums. Yet, despite all of this history together I am thinking seriously of leaving Planet Ubuntu. Here’s why.

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.

Kerala saves Rs 300 cr as schools switch to open software

The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was in 2005 only that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. Read more

Tired of Windows and MAC computer systems? Linux may now be ready for prime time

Are you a bit tired of the same old options of salt and pepper, meaning having to choose only between the venerable Windows and MAC computer operating systems? Looking to branch out a bit, maybe take a walk on the wild side, learn some new things and save money? If so, the Linux operating system, which has been around for a long time and is used and loved by many hard-core techies and developers, may now be ready for prime time with the masses. Read more

Braswell based Pico-ITX SBC offers multiple expansion options

Axiomtek’s PICO300 is a Pico-ITX SBC with Intel Braswell, SATA-600, extended temperature support, and both a mini-PCIe and homegrown expansion connector. Axiomtek has launched a variation on its recently announced Intel Apollo Lake based PICO312 SBC that switches to the older Intel Braswell generation and offers a slightly reduced feature set. The board layout has also changed somewhat, with LVDS, SATA, and USB ports all changing location. Read more