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Tuesday, 21 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 07/06/2015 - 3:22pm
Story Steam Machines (Debian-powered) Roy Schestowitz 07/06/2015 - 3:17pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 07/06/2015 - 3:14pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 07/06/2015 - 3:13pm
Story Galicia invites nominations for open source award Roy Schestowitz 07/06/2015 - 10:12am
Story Replace SourceForge with these Better Alternatives Roy Schestowitz 07/06/2015 - 8:31am
Story Gorgeous Ubuntu-Based Mangaka Linux for Anime and Manga Fans Enters Beta Rianne Schestowitz 06/06/2015 - 8:43pm
Story Linux Mint window customization options outshine Windows Rianne Schestowitz 06/06/2015 - 7:43pm
Story The New DRM Graphics Drivers For Linux 4.2: AMDGPU & VirtIO Rianne Schestowitz 06/06/2015 - 7:37pm
Story Linux Kernel 4.0.5 Is Out with x86, ARM, and XFS Improvements, Updated Drivers Rianne Schestowitz 06/06/2015 - 6:43pm

Ubuntu 10.04 brings Linux closer to the mainstream

Filed under
Ubuntu

washingtonpost.com: No Windows viruses. Free. Any questions? Of course. Start with this one: How can an operating system with those virtues, the open-source Linux, remain confined to a tiny minority of desktop and laptop computers at home?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Radeon "R600g" Gallium3D Driver Merged To Master
  • Running Gentoo Linux on HP Pavilion dm1-1110ev – Result: Success
  • Key WebOS developer jumps ship to Team Android
  • The quiet Ubuntu Netbook revolution
  • Apple files for WebKit browser trademark
  • Five Reasons Willow Garage is Going to Succeed
  • TuxRadar Podcast s2e9: Google Gaggle
  • The Linux Link Tech Show #355 May 26
  • View3ds, viewer for 3D Studio files and V4L Loopback Device
  • Open source pays off for TimeTrex
  • Does Linux Do Enough for Programmers?
  • One Laptop Per Child Revamps Tablet Plans
  • Sabayon 5.3 Progress, Get Involved with Testing, Bumps
  • PCLinuxOS

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Remove Repositories In Ubuntu
  • Hassle-free Backup with Déjà Dup
  • Detailed tutorial about AppArmor for ubuntu users
  • Manual disk partitioning guide for Linux Mint 9 and Ubuntu 10.04
  • Making Movies in Linux with Kdenlive, part 2
  • A Collection of Silly Little Perl Snippets
  • generate and update ODF spreadsheets without OpenOffice
  • The command line PostScript swiss knife: a2ps
  • How to Install Sun Java on Ubuntu 10.04
  • How to mount samba share on Linux client
  • Install Compiz Fusion and Emerald in Fedora 13
  • Dependency-based & Event-based init daemons and launchd
  • The top 10 tricks of Perl one-liners

What is "open source"?

Filed under
OSS
  • What is "open source"? (And why should you care?)
  • What Should be Expected of FLOSS Contributors?
  • Welcome to the world of open source software
  • Why Open Source Makes Sense: Scientifically Proven
  • Google demands more openness from the Open Source Initiative
  • A Thriving FOSS Community on the North
  • An Open Source Principle: One Good Thing Leads To Another

KDE 4.5 beta brings window tiling, new notifications

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica.com: The developers behind the KDE desktop environment have released the first beta of version 4.5. Although the major focus during this development cycle is stability, the release also brings some nice new features and user interface improvements.

Mozilla trying to build VP8 into HTML5 video

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla trying to build VP8 into HTML5 video
  • VLC 1.1.0 Release Candidate supports WebM / VP8
  • WebM - The New Open Source Codec on the Block

Impressions of the latest MeeGo release

Filed under
Linux

blog.nixternal.com: So, I have been spending some time playing around with various netbook operating systems lately, trying to find that perfect one. I have a Dell Mini 10v netbook without bluetooth and with the stock battery. Now on to MeeGo!

Launchy vs. GNOME Do vs. Kupfer

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: Today we’ll compare three of the better known launchers for Linux – Launchy, GNOME Do, and Kupfer. While they all have roughly the same function, each has a different take on how it should be done, and the configuration capabilities vary greatly from one to the next. Here, you’ll see what makes each one unique.

Application Menu (Global Menu) For Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.10 Is Available For Testing

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Global Menu for Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.10 has just been uploaded to a PPA. The new "global menu" is called "Application Menu" and it can be installed in Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx already (both in GNOME and KDE). Here's how.

[Rest here]

MeeGo Netbook Performance: It's Beating Ubuntu & Co

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: The last time we ran a performance comparison of different Linux distributions on netbooks was in late November, but now we have a new set of Linux distributions out there, so we have carried out a new comparison. In particular, we are looking closely at how the MeeGo distribution --

Just released Qimo 2.0

Filed under
Linux

qimo4kids.com: It has been a little over a year since I put Qimo 1.0 together using little more than a Wiki page and long sessions of trial and error. Now, using a few more resources and a little better planning, I’ve been able to release version 2.0.

YaST: Yet Another Setup Tool

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: Continuing with our look into OpenSuSE, we examine YaST. One of the best things going for OpenSuSE (and SuSE as well) is their take on the tried and true “control panal” YaST. YaST is, quite literally, a one-stop-shop for configuring Linux.

Crebs: The ULTIMATE Wallpaper Slideshow application

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: A few days ago we blogged about a simple wallpaper slideshow generator called, somewhat un-surprisingly, ‘wallpaper slideshow’. Well… forget that.

Measuring the popularity of distros – Part 2 Google Trends

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxblog.net: Yesterday I did a post about using the Distrowatch rankings to measure the popularity of various distros. Today I’m going to use another tool, Google Trends.

Mandriva 2010 Spring background contest winners

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com: Here are the results of the contest Mandriva launched one month ago. Thanks everybody for your interest and for contributing, we had almost 150 photos submitted.

Fedora 13: Boring yet Good

Filed under
Linux

itnewstoday.com: It’s hard to believe that Fedora is already at it’s thirteenth version. As usual, I decided to test Fedora 13 on my Dell Latitude D630 laptop, which gets by with its 2ghz processor, and its decent 4GB of RAM and integrated Intel graphics.

The developer obsession with code names, 114 interesting examples

Filed under
OS
Linux
Software

royal.pingdom.com: Code names have been around for a long time. Remember the Manhattan project in the 1940s? That turned out to be the atomic bomb. Thankfully, not all code names hide such sinister projects. So what kind of code names are developers out there coming up with?

World's Funniest Windows Error Messages

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

junauza.com: We all know how it sucks to see error messages. If you have been using Windows all your life, you have probably seen lots of them already.

$100 computing in 2010

Filed under
OLPC
  • $100 computing in 2010
  • OLPC & Marvell to Redefine Tablet Computing (PR)
  • OLPC's Negroponte Says XO-3 Prototype Tablet Coming in 2010
  • The OLPC's real importance is as a conversation starter

A quick visual tour of MeeGo 1.0 for netbooks

Filed under
OS

From seemingly out of nowhere yesterday MeeGo, a Linux Foundation-approved alliance between Nokia and Intel, released v1.0 of what they’re calling the netbook user experience. Way to channel Jimi Hendrix there.

So like the band with the similar name, will MeeGo blow your mind? Let’s find out…

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Programming: Swift, Brilliant Jerks in Engineering, and Career Path for Software Developers

  • Swift code will run on Google's Fuchsia OS
    A few days ago, there was a flash-in-the-pan controversy over Google "forking" Apple's open-source programming language Swift. After a few minutes of speculation over whether Google was going to make its own special flavor of the language for its own purposes, Swift's creator Chris Lattner (who now works at Google) helpfully clarified the situation:
  • Brilliant Jerks in Engineering
    This are numerous articles and opinions on the topic, including Brilliant Jerks Cost More Than They Are Worth, and It's Better to Avoid a Toxic Employee than Hire a Superstar. My colleague Justin Becker is also giving a talk at QConSF 2017 on the topic: Am I a Brilliant Jerk?. It may help to clarify that "brilliant jerk" can mean different things to different people. To illustrate, I'll describe two types of brilliant jerks: the selfless and the selfish, and their behavior in detail. I'll then describe the damage caused by these jerks, and ways to deal with them. The following are fictional characters. These are not two actual engineers, but are collections of related traits to help examine this behavior beyond the simple "no asshole rule." These are engineers who by default act like jerks, not engineers who sometimes act that way.
  • [Older] The missing career path for software developers
    You started hacking on technology thrilled with every stroke of the key, making discoveries with every commit. You went about solving problems, finding new challenges. You were happy for a while, until you hit a plateau. There was a choice to be made. Continue solving the same problems or start managing others. You tried it out, and hated it. Longing to focus on technology, not people, you turned to your open source project. When it became successful, you became an open source maintainer but ended up overwhelmed and burned out. Hoping to get back to doing work that fascinates you, you went work for yourself. Lacking experience running a business, you're crushed with all the decisions you need to make. You’re nearing burnout — again. It feels like you’re on a hamster wheel.

Mastodon is Free Software, But It Does Not Respect Free Speech

Mastodon was always known to be tough on Nazis; it was known that they were strict on free speech only to a degree. After the treatment that I received yesterday, however, I can no longer recommend Mastodon. It may be Free software, but it’s very weak on free speech. Read more

today's howtos