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About Tux Machines

Monday, 02 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux.org comes back to life srlinuxx 11/07/2012 - 9:33pm
Story KDE 4.9 Release Caters to Power Users srlinuxx 11/07/2012 - 9:31pm
Story KDE assures users they can depend on Qt srlinuxx 11/07/2012 - 9:23pm
Blog entry Video Calls on the move.. lots of choices many questions. fieldyweb 11/07/2012 - 9:21pm
Story The Linux shell will always be with us srlinuxx 11/07/2012 - 9:20pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 464 srlinuxx 09/07/2012 - 10:43pm
Story Must-Have Missing Features in Ubuntu srlinuxx 09/07/2012 - 10:38pm
Story Mandriva divides itself once again srlinuxx 09/07/2012 - 10:37pm
Story PCLinuxOS KDE 2012.2: Pretty and solid distro srlinuxx 09/07/2012 - 10:33pm
Story Linux leap second issues being fixed: developer srlinuxx 09/07/2012 - 10:29pm

Three myths Microsoft tells Russia

Filed under
OSS

cnet.com: I'm at the Moscow airport getting ready to fly back to the United States. Before I leave, however, I figured it would be good to note (and then bury) three myths that I heard perpetuated by Microsoft at the Interop Moscow conference.

This, too, shall pass, or: Things to remember when reading news about OLPC

Filed under
OLPC

radian.org: It’s easy to get caught up in the doom and gloom over OLPC’s future. But keep things in perspective: they aren’t as bad as they seem.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • OpenSolaris 2008.05 Gives A New Face To Solaris

  • From camera to website: Building an open source video streamer
  • Tasque - a simple todo list application for GNOME
  • Opera 9.5 Beta 2 (Kestrel) Is Awesome
  • Protecting directory trees with gpgdir
  • Distrowatch gets real?
  • openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 19
  • Issue 12 - One Year of Full Circle Magazine

Benchmarking Linux With the Phoronix Test Suite

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Knowing how to measure your own computer performance gives you mighty system and network tuning powers. It's also fun. We're going to take a look at the brand-new Phoronix Test Suite, which is for testing hardware performance under Linux.

FreeBSD developer Kip Macy charged with tenant terror

Filed under
Legal

theregister.co.uk: Prominent FreeBSD developer Kip Macy has been charged with waging a campaign of terror against people renting apartments in a six-unit building he owns. He stands accused of cutting out floor supports to retaliate against a tenant who went to court to keep from being evicted.

more ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Why I'm recommending people not upgrade to Ubuntu 8.04 yet

  • Five Reasons Ubuntu Server Revolution Begins Today
  • Ubuntu’s corporate ready 8.04 is released but is three a crowd in Linux market?
  • Screenlets work with Compiz widget layer in Ubuntu Gutsy

Hardy Heron? Hardly

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: If there appears to be more interest in the release of Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) than the average distribution, I think I should take some of the blame.

10 ways to sell corporate on Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Your systems are all way overdue for an operating system upgrade, but your IT department is going over budget. You know you can’t afford the latest version of Microsoft Windows or Office. The easiest path to reining in your costs would be to migrate over to the Linux operating system. Unfortunately, corporate headquarters isn’t convinced that Linux is the way to go. How do you convince them otherwise?

Red Hat-Ubuntu pairing would have potential

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: I’m starting to see some big potential for symbiosis between two Linux and open source leaders: Red Hat and Ubuntu. Red Hat’s departure from the consumer desktop Linux market comes at the same time Ubuntu continues rolling in the same market with the release of Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron this week.

Firefox reached 29% share in Europe

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: XiTi Monitor has released the latest numbers on browsers utilization in Europe and the rest of the world, announcing it has reached about 29% in March 2008.

Drivers highlight Linux Summit progress

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: The final release on the recent Linux Collaboration Summit is out and the big word is drivers. Software drivers.

A coder practices multimedia journalism - with open-source tools

Filed under
OSS

pbs.org: I use free and open source software, almost exclusively, when I practice journalism. Free and open source software is counter-intuitive to many, but the mantra of the free software movement uses terms that journalists should understand very well.

Hands on with Ubuntu 8.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxformat.co.uk: Yes, the Hardy Heron is here! This is the new Long Term Support (LTS) release of Ubuntu, and is possibly the most eagerly anticipated distro of all time. Read on for our hands-on look at the new features, with screenshots galore...

Also: Review: Why Ubuntu 'Hardy Heron' Wins Laurels

The success in Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: An article recently put out, asks the question "Why are there no Linux billionaires?" What is the problem with there being no "billionaires"? That's the problem with most of the people associated with this, they automatically equate success to expanse of finances.

Browsing the Web the old-fashioned way

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Are you in the mood for some '90s-style Web browsing with no graphic elements? Or, more realistically, do you work with a Linux console and often need to check something on the Web? If so, get acquainted with text-based Web browsers such as w3m, Lynx, and the similarly named Links.

Nemo Review: A New File Manager for Linux

Filed under
Software

madpenguin.org: Generally speaking, I have been quite happy using Nautilus with a little help from Tracker from time to time. Nautilus is a no nonsense file manager that allows most users to get the most out of their files and the way they choose to manage them.

Where do we go from here now that Gnome has grown up?

Filed under
Software

ibeentoubuntu.com: My recent post about old the beginnings of Gnome and my natural tendency to look at the Roadmap for the next version of Gnome and Ubuntu when an Ubuntu release comes out have led me to a conclusion: Gnome is pretty much finished.

The Usefulness Of Linux-Next

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: Discussing the latest breakage of the linux-next tree, Stephen Rothwell noted that the problem went unnoticed due to the arm tree not currently being included, "this is why I would have liked you to participate in the linux-next tree ...".

Is it too late for open source Java?

Filed under
Software

blogs.zdnet: Sun says it is working hard to make Java completely open source so Linux shops can use it. But is it already too late?

One last, good look at KDE 3 Part 2

Filed under
KDE

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: Some little updates on my KDE experiment. First of all, I run an rsync script semi-daily to backup my home drive to an external hard drive in case the main one fails. It’s already happened to me once before and I was really glad to have had backups. However, as you can imagine, this is a huge drain on my computer’s resources.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source SDR SBC runs Snappy Ubuntu on Cyclone V

The open source, $299 “LimeSDR” board runs Snappy Ubuntu Core on a Cyclone V, and supports user-defined radios ranging from ZigBee to LTE. UK-based Lime Microsystems, which develops field programmable RF (FPRF) transceivers for wireless broadband systems, has launched an open source software defined radio (SDR) board on CrowdSupply. Like other Linux-based SDR systems we’ve seen, the LimeSDR uses an FPGA to help orchestrate wireless communications that can be tuned, manipulated, and reconfigured to different wireless standards via software. Read more

Critical Infrastructure Goes Open Source

The electrical grid, water, roads and bridges—the infrastructure we take for granted—is seldom noticed until it's unavailable. The burgeoning open source software movement is taking steps to help rebuild crumbling U.S. civil infrastructure while capitalizing on expansion in emerging markets by providing software building blocks to help develop interoperable and secure transportation, electric power, oil and gas as well as the healthcare infrastructure. Under a program launched in April called the Civil Infrastructure Platform, the Linux Foundation said the initiative would provide "an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of software building blocks for civil infrastructure." Read more

Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

In past years, the vast ocean of Apple logos really undercut any statement of “Linux is great.” People would, inevitably, retort with, “Then why are all the 'Linux People' using Macs?” Admittedly, that was a great point and has been a source of shame for many of us for a very long time. But now things are different. The Apple logos are (mostly) gone from Linux conferences. This may be an unscientific observation from one person attending a few conferences in North America. Regardless, it's a great feeling. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu 16.04 to-do list
    UBUNTU 16.04 or Xenial Xerus, the latest upgrade of the popular Linux distribution, became available as a free download last month, and early reviews have been favorable. Instead of upgrading my existing Ubuntu 15.10 system, this time I opted for a fresh install. I also decided to give the improved Unity 7 desktop a go, instead of installing my preferred alternative XFCE. The installation process was trouble-free, but because I started from scratch, I had quite a bit to add and tweak after the OS itself was installed.
  • Ubuntu Founder Pledges No Back Doors in Linux
    VIDEO: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, discusses what might be coming in Ubuntu 16.10 later this year and why security is something he will never compromise. Ubuntu developers are gathering this week for the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS), which runs from May 3-5, to discuss development plans for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 Linux distribution release, code-named "Yakkety Yak."
  • Ubuntu & Other Ubuntu Spins Look At Making Room To Grow
    With Ubuntu's install images continuing to be oversized with pushing 1.4GB on recent releases, Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek has raised the new limit for Ubuntu desktop images to 2GB. Other Ubuntu flavors are also following in this move. Langasek has raised the size limit for images now to 2GB for being able to accomodate the current oversized images plus still having room to grow.
  • Ubuntu’s Snap packages aren’t yet as secure as Canonical’s marketing claims
    Canonical has been talking up Snaps, a new type of package format featured in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. “Users can install a snap without having to worry whether it will have an impact on their other apps or their system,” reads Canonical’s announcement. But this isn’t true, as prominent free software developer Matthew Garrett recently pointed out.