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Wednesday, 23 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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When KDE 4′s Activities Finally Made Sense

Filed under
KDE

ericsbinaryworld.com: I’ve been using KDE since November of 2010 around the time that 4.5 was released for Fedora. Around the time of 4.4, the KDE folks, especially Aaron Seigo and the rest of the Plasma team, started really pushing activities. I kept talking to people on identica and I couldn’t quite figure out the point of activities.

Narwhal Plush Wallpaper

Filed under
Ubuntu

doctormo.org: Artist ICantThinkofAName has updated his wallpaper of all the Ubuntu versions as plush toys. Link here

Looks Do Matter

Filed under
Software
OSS

networkworld.com: A few weeks past I wrote about why some open source projects, especially consumer-oriented technology, were not gaining the type of traction in the marketplace that is seen by infrastructure open source projects such as Linux. I initially focused on the disconnect between the consumer and the developer. I have thought more on this explanation and am now thinking that another factor is at play.

Can You Trust Google? Why Take a Chance?

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Google

russellhollander.com: Google is the dominant search engine in the world right now, as everyone on the Internet surely knows. However, there are things I don’t love about Google. They’re very good at profiling you and targeting ads to you.

Popular Puzzle Game 'Wind and Water' Comes to Linux

Filed under
Gaming

ubuntuvibes.com: Wind and Water : Puzzle Battles is one of the most addictive puzzle games made by an independent game development company Yuan Works.

Fotoxx – The swiss army knife of Linux photo editors

Filed under
Software

ubuntumanual.org: Fotoxx is an open source and freely available photo editing tool similar to Gimp. With its current version 11.02, it is packed with some pretty cool features despite its small size.

Building Systems Secure From The Start

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: Default operating system installs on a server are almost always wrong. Unfortunate, but true. In an attempt to build a generic system that appeals to as many situations as possible, the default install is often overloaded with software that is not necessary, and a filesystem layout that would allow one rogue daemon to fill up the entire drive.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • automatically start an application after KDE start up
  • Friendly ways to build cross-platform software
  • Space without the Fun
  • How to install TeXLive 2010 on Ubuntu 10.10
  • Arch Linux
  • How to burn ISO image to CD or DVD
  • ForgeRock Shines on Sun's Legacy Identity
  • Tabbed ssh connection manager for gtk
  • hardware info with guide to commands
  • X.Org Server 1.10 Is Getting Close
  • SSH across a Layer 7 Filter
  • Counting and Sums with awk
  • BSDInstall and pc-sysinstall to merge
  • 6 Open Source CMDB
  • Convert Video To AVI Easily Using Video2Avi
  • Nokia Admits to not Focusing on Desktop QT
  • KDEMU Markey’s Movin’

Fluxbox 1.3 Released | What’s new | Compile

Filed under
Fluxbox
HowTos

linuxnov.com: Fluxbox is a great lightweight X window manager that does not require a high machine performance to use it. Been a long time since last Fluxbox stable release from two years, finally Fluxbox 1.3 has been released today with quite a few new features.

The Version Number Game

jeffhoogland.blogspot: We all play it. Every hacker, code monkey, and developer that produces a piece of software - The Version Number Game.

Huh. Font licensing.

Filed under
OSS

blog.melchua: So this afternoon I was making business cards for Teaching Open Source community members to hand out at the big SIGCSE conference that’s coming up. Karsten asked me to check out his blog post about a slip-up on font licensing for theopensourceway.org. Shoot, I didn’t think about that.

Looking at a few Operating Systems

Filed under
Linux

technologytales.com: The last few weeks have seen me poking around with a few different operating systems to see how they perform. With the inclusion of Unity in the forthcoming Ubuntu “Natty Narwhal” 11.04, I am mindful of the need to be keeping an eye on alternative options should there ever be a need to jump ship.

Bodhi Linux RC2 & Updates

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: After three weeks of user input and a few bugs reports the Bodhi team and I are happy to present our second release candidate (version number 0.1.6). This version features package updates.

VLC Celebrating its Tenth Birthday - True Success Story

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Software

techdrivein.com: Like most of you, VLC Media Player has been an integral part of my life around Linux which started nearly 4 years ago. VLC is celebrating its 10 birthday and we at Tech Drive-in wish the awesome people behind VLC all the very best for the future.

bit more here

Debian Squeeze: about relevance and visibility

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Linux

ghabuntu.com: The new awaited Debian 6.0 “Squeeze” has been recently released. I only got it a quick look on my blog. What more surprised me has been all the discussion about Debian “relevance” that appeared on the Internet just after Debian release.

BSD Magazine 2011/02 Released

Filed under
BSD

bsdmag.org: Highlights include: ZFS and FreeBSD, Network transparent rate limitation with ipfw, Building an iSCSI storage with BSD, How to setup a USB Memory stick for installing a pfSense SoHo Firewall/Router, and Mutt On OS X.

Pardus Kurumsal 2

Filed under
Linux

elevenislouder.blogspot: Yesterday, I did something that I always do. I checked DistroWatch for the latest news. Something interesting was listed there. Apparently, Pardus has a "Corporate" edition. This isn't a paid release or anything. It's another version of Pardus that uses only trusted components.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 163 is out

Filed under
SUSE

Mozilla delays final Firefox beta

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: It's looking increasingly unlikely that Mozilla will ship Firefox 4 this month.

‘Ubuntu Linux’, ‘Ubuntu GNU/Linux’? No, use ‘Ubuntu’!

Filed under
Ubuntu

sensehofstede.nl: When people talk about Ubuntu, they usually have two ways of referring to it. Most frequently people use ‘Ubuntu’, but at some places you’ll find ‘Ubuntu Linux’ very consistently. In this blog post I want to argue here to stop calling Ubuntu ‘Ubuntu Linux’.

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Security Leftovers

  • efail: Outdated Crypto Standards are to blame
    I have a lot of thoughts about the recently published efail vulnerability, so I thought I'd start to writeup some of them. I'd like to skip all the public outrage about the disclosure process for now, as I mainly wanted to get into the technical issues, explain what I think went wrong and how things can become more secure in the future. I read lots of wrong statements that "it's only the mail clients" and the underlying crypto standards are fine, so I'll start by explaining why I believe the OpenPGP and S/MIME standards are broken and why we still see these kinds of bugs in 2018. I plan to do a second writeup that will be titled "efail: HTML mails are to blame". I assume most will have heard of efail by now, but the quick version is this: By combining a weakness in cryptographic modes along with HTML emails a team of researchers was able to figure out a variety of ways in which mail clients can be tricked into exfiltrating the content of encrypted e-mails. Not all of the attack scenarios involve crypto, but those that do exploit a property of encryption modes that is called malleability. It means that under certain circumstances you can do controlled changes of the content of an encrypted message. [...] Properly using authenticated encryption modes can prevent a lot of problems. It's been a known issue in OpenPGP, but until know it wasn't pressing enough to fix it. The good news is that with minor modifications OpenPGP can still be used safely. And having a future OpenPGP standard with proper authenticated encryption is definitely possible. For S/MIME the situation is much more dire and it's probably best to just give up on it. It was never a good idea in the first place to have competing standards for e-mail encryption. For other crypto protocols there's a lesson to be learned as well: Stop using unauthenticated encryption modes. If anything efail should make that abundantly clear.
  • Comcast Leaked Customer Wi-Fi Logins in Plaintext, Change Your Passcode Now
    A Comcast Xfinity website was leaking Wi-Fi names and passwords, meaning now is a good time to change your Wi-Fi passcode. The site, intended to help new customers set up new routers, could easily be fooled into revealing the location of and password for any customer’s Wi-Fi network. A customer ID and a house or apartment number was all would-be attackers needed to get full access to your network, along with your full address.
  • Update Fedora Linux using terminal for latest software patches
  • Patch for New Spectre-Like CPU Bug Could Affect Your Performance
  • container_t versus svirt_lxc_net_t

today's howtos

Red Hat News

  • “Ultimate Private Cloud” Demo, Under The Hood!
    At the recent Red Hat Summit in San Francisco, and more recently the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, the OpenStack engineering team worked on some interesting demos for the keynote talks. I’ve been directly involved with the deployment of Red Hat OpenShift Platform on bare metal using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director deployment/management tool, integrated with openshift-ansible. I’ll give some details of this demo, the upstream TripleO features related to this work, and insight around the potential use-cases.
  • Discover the possibilities of hybrid cloud during a joint virtual event with Red Hat & Microsoft [Ed: [Ed: When Red Hat pus Microsoft executives at top positions inside Red Hat...]
  • Red Hat OpenStack Customer Survey 2018: containers, technical support top of mind
    In 2016, we surveyed our customer base on their use of OpenStack in production, getting a pulse-check on the top considerations, expectations, and benefits of a Red Hat OpenStack Platform deployment. With 2018 marking five years of Red Hat OpenStack Platform, we checked back in with our customers to see if their experiences or expectations of OpenStack have changed. Our survey found:
  • Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst On How He Plans To Win The Container Market
  • Juniper, Red Hat Tighten Integration to Fend Off VMware
    Juniper Networks and Red Hat have tightened their integration efforts in a move to help ease enterprise adoption of cloud-native platforms and bolster their own offerings against the likes of VMware and Cisco. The latest platform integration includes the Red Hat OpenStack Platform; Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform running as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) on top of or next to the OpenStack platform depending on deployment architecture; and Juniper’s Contrail Enterprise Multi-Cloud platform running as the networking and security layer to unify those together. This integration is designed as a managed system to help deploy and run applications and services on any virtual machine (VM), container platform, and any cloud environment.
  • Red Hat OpenStack HCI Targets Telco Hybrid Cloud, 5G Deployments
    Red Hat today rolled out a hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) platform based on OpenStack compute and Ceph storage. The new product targets service providers looking to deploy virtual network functions (VNFs) and 5G technologies on top of open source software. Launched at this week’s OpenStack Summit, the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud combines Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 and Red Hat Ceph Storage 3 into one product. Red Hat says it is the largest contributor to both open source projects.
  • Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud Bridges Datacenters and Edge Deployments
  • GSoC 2018: Week 1
    This time, I am working on improving the Fedora Community App with the Fedora project. It’s been a week since we started off our coding on may 14. The Fedora App is a central location for Fedora users and innovators to stay updated on The Fedora Project. News updates, social posts, Ask Fedora, as well as articles from Fedora Magazine are all held under this app.

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