Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

The 12 best Firefox 3.0 tweaks

Filed under
Moz/FF

pcadvisor.co.uk: Firefox 3.0 is great, but to make it even better check out these functions and features. Each can be altered or tweaked to make your web-browsing experience near perfect.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux 2.6.25.10

  • Ubuntu MID - part 1: application list, part 2: communication, part 3: communication
  • Top of the charts: five open source file sharing apps
  • A lament for the system tray
  • Salute to an icon
  • OLPC Nigeria One Year Later: Hard Lessons Learned
  • Ubuntu 8.04.1 LTS released
  • First look at Ubuntu 8.10 - Intrepid Ibex
  • Sabayon 3.5 + some really miscellaneous links
  • Microsoft Mends Breach in Open Source Sandcastle
  • WordPress 2.6 Beta 2 Review

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • IOzone for filesystem performance benchmarking

  • Configuring your fonts optimally in openSUSE 11.0
  • Basic I/O Redirection Differences In Sh/Ksh, Bash and Zsh On Linux And Unix
  • How to write a thorough review of a Linux distribution
  • Printing Directly To PDF in Ubuntu 8.04
  • Linux Easter Egg Fun
  • Let Firefox 2 and 3 co-exist in your Linux box
  • VI Basic Movement

It's not the Gates, it's the bars

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Richard Stallman: To pay so much attention to Bill Gates' retirement is missing the point. What really matters is not Gates, nor Microsoft, but the unethical system of restrictions that Microsoft, like many other software companies, imposes on its customers.

Ubuntu vs PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS
Ubuntu

stormy-subbu.blogspot: Well It is not about which is a better OS overall, but which suited me better. PCLinuxOS(/Ripper Gang) did a really nice job in giving a very polished setup and collecting very good packages for PCLinuxOS 2007.

My first hours with PCLINUXOS

Filed under
PCLOS
Ubuntu

web4beta.com: As a mentioned in my previous post I spent a little time last night installing PCLINUXOS on my laptop. I installed the MiniMe version of the distro, the Live CD of which weighs in at just over 200MB. It’s meant to be just enough to get get everything up and running so you can then, through ATP or Synaptic, install just the software you want.

A User's Freedom to Choose

Filed under
KDE

linuxtoday.com: There has been a lot of vitriol lofted towards the KDE 4 development folks lately, with calls for forking and the questioning of the need for users getting lobbed back and forth between the two sides of the argument. Emotions are running high, and there seems to be no way of resolving the issues that have gotten people so upset.

KDE Developer Quits

Filed under
KDE

practical-tech.com: Recently though several KDE developers came right out and asked, “Does KDE even need (certain) users?” Unrau’s opinion was quickly seconded by another KDE developer, Jason Harris, who said, “KDE, like many other open-source projects, doesn’t really need users at all. In the end though, KDE has ended up with at least one less developer.

Why I Hate KDE? Paradigm

Filed under
KDE

isriya.com: This story has begun by a blog post from a man called Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols. The reason why I don’t use KDE is obvious: Paradigm. (or perspective, way of thinking, approach).

There’s Something About Pardus 2008

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Because Pardus 2007 left a lasting impression on me, I have been eagerly waiting for its next release. So when the stable version of Pardus 2008 came out just recently, I never hesitated to try and test this promising distro from Turkey once again.

6 Free Tools For Creating Top-Notch Documents

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: I use a ton of software applications, but a major portion of the time I spend using a computer goes to writing, and creating documents. In this post, I'll cover six free applications--five of them open source and one freeware app--that can help you create eye-catching documents.

OpenOffice.org extension will add PDF editing

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: Easy PDF editing is coming to OpenOffice.org, but you'll have to be patient for a few months. Recently posted to the OpenOffice.org Extensions site, the Sun PDF Import extension (SPI) is only in beta, and only works with recent developer builds of OpenOffice.org 3.0, which is scheduled for September release.

ATI Radeon HD 4870 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: A week ago we looked at the brand-new ATI Radeon HD 4850 graphics card under Linux. This graphics card launch was unlike any in ATI's history. Today we're publishing our complete review of the new ATI Radeon HD 4870 512MB as well as delivering additional benchmarks from the Radeon HD 4850 under Linux, of course.

Beyond the desktop with KDE4

Filed under
KDE

tectonic.co.za: Lately, there has been quite some bitching on the fringes of the KDE project about KDE4 and the direction it takes. Some people go as far as saying: “Give us back our old desktop!” I beg to differ.

Sidux, a Great Alternative to Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: Sidux is a new Debian derivative that's still just a baby, born in January 2007. Sidux announced a brand-new release on June 26, Sidux 2008-02, so we're going to kick the tires and take it for a drive, and see what sets it apart from other children of Debian.

OpenSUSE 11…a lot of new goodness, a lot of old goodness

Filed under
SUSE

labyrinth.org: Well I know compared to most people I am writing down my opinion of the latest OpenSUSE release a little late but…I wanted to try it out a bit, kick the tires before I put anything on here about it. And I am certainly glad I did.

Fedora 9 & KDE 4 review

Filed under
Linux

inatux.com/blog: Fedora 9 with default installation, starts you with the Gnome Desktop Environment, but all of us here at InaTux personally prefer KDE. So, we went through the installation process once more and changed "Customize later" to "Customize now."

An introduction to the Kismet packet sniffer

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Kismet is a wireless "detector, sniffer, and intrusion detection system," and one of the growing list of essential open source tools for computer network security professionals. Kismet runs on any POSIX-compliant platform, including Windows, Mac OS X, and BSD, but Linux is the preferred platform.

Home automation in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Home Automation is anything that your home does for you automatically to make living there more enjoyable or productive. It covers many areas, including remote and timed control of lights and electrical home appliances, distributed media services, and communication. In this introductory article, I will carry out a high-level review of a number of these projects to see what is already available.

KDE vs. GNOME: A Screed from a Supposed Corporate Flack

Filed under
Software

opsamericas.com: Ok, so you know that currently SLED (SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop) 10 defaults to GNOME as the desktop, a move that garnered a few cranky folks from the KDE [KC]amp. openSUSE 11.0 doesn’t force such a choice, you have several options, none is selected by default.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more