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Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story FOSS Fact or Fiction? A Tale of Two Surveys srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 6:38pm
Story Debian Project News - April 29th srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 4:52pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 505 srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 9:24am
Story Windows 8 still a hurdle for Linux srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 9:22am
Story What's new in Linux 3.9 srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 9:20am
Story Caledonia: Art Suite for KDE srlinuxx 28/04/2013 - 11:02pm
Story One Of The Most Important Tools In Linux srlinuxx 28/04/2013 - 10:58pm
Story Performance Based, Ubuntu 13.04 Review srlinuxx 28/04/2013 - 10:52pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 28/04/2013 - 7:31am
Story TuxRadar Distro Picker srlinuxx 2 27/04/2013 - 1:33am

Five Reasons Ubuntu Is the #1 Linux Distro

Filed under
Ubuntu

dawningvalley.com: Ubuntu is, according to DistroWatch, the #1 Linux distribution. That’s a huge feat in itself. However, once you realize that Ubuntu is only three and a half years old, the feat is much bigger. How did the Linux rookie beat out the nine-year-old Mandrake, the fourteen-year-old SUSE, or the fifteen-year-old Debian?

few bloggings & a post

Filed under
Linux
  • Installing Linux Mint 5 Elyssa

  • Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex 8.10- The Ugliest Ubuntu Ever?
  • Changing Distros
  • [Review] Dream Linux
  • Opensuse 11

Always Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Eating Crow: Ubuntu Not Better Than Mandriva

Filed under
MDV
Ubuntu

blogbeebe.blogspot: I could spend the next hour of my personal time (and a lot of digital ink) listing in detail what has gone wrong over the last year, as I've migrated from Ubuntu 7.04 to Ubuntu 8.04.1. In fact, the Linux Haters Blog is surprisingly close to documenting most, if not all, of my gripes.

Kevin Carmony Video Interview with Chris Pirillo about Linspire's Last Days

Filed under
Linux

kevincarmony.blogspot: I've known Chris Pirillo for several years, and he's one of only a handful of people I follow on Twitter because he's ALWAYS got his pulse on the latest, coolest stuff. In following my blog, he was surprised to learn about some of the "weird stuff" that was going on with Linspire, so he invited me to his live chat room for an Interview.

openSUSE 11.0 after a couple of weeks

Filed under
SUSE

jaysonrowe.wordpress: I want to post about my experience with openSUSE 11.0 after using it for a while. Many of these points may not apply to you, since they reflect my personal usage habits.

KDE4: The MS Vista of Linux?

Filed under
KDE

theeternaluniverse.blogspot: Most people in Linux circles have heard the slogan: "Release Early, Release Often." This often translates to a rule that you make small software changes frequently instead of doing major overhauls that take a long time to get out the door. Two projects, recently, have strayed from the above rule: Microsoft Vista and KDE4.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Control CPU scaling in Ubuntu

  • Add Open Command Prompt Here Functionality To Nautilus In Ubuntu
  • pstree command
  • IPSec between Linux and the NetScreen
  • Install OpenOffice.org 3.0 Beta on Ubuntu
  • Deploying a Git Repository Server in Ubuntu

Why Is So Hard for Windows Users to Understand That Linux Is Not Windows

Filed under
Linux

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: This is just a rant (hopefully it will be regarded as pertinent and non-'laming') on why Windows users try Linux and return frustrated to Windows after several hours or days. I won't praise Linux and the way it works, I won't even compare and say 'here Linux is easier because ...', instead I have a few questions for all of you who blame Linux for not being and behaving like Windows.

Tough choices ahead for Red Hat?

weblog.infoworld.com: I missed Red Hat's fiscal 1Q09 release a few weeks ago, so I went back and read the transcript and dug into the numbers a little. Total revenue growth has averaged 31 percent/quarter since fiscal 1Q08. Surprisingly though, Sales & Marketing and R&D have grown 32 percent/quarter and 37 percent/quarter over the same period.

Open Source Development: About Community and Sponsored Projects

Filed under
OSS

robertogaloppini.net: Classifying Open Source production models is not an academic curiosity, as result from recent conversations on how the development model affects at large the software life-cycle and, more important, the business strategy.

Apricot - Open-Source Blender Game

Filed under
Linux

Apricot is the newest project from the Blender Institute with the goal to build an open-source game instead of a Blender video this time. The characters used in the game are from the Big Buck Bunny movie, the last free movie developed using Blender under the name Project Peach.

The Ultimate Guide to Choosing the Right Desktop Enviroment

Filed under
Software

internetling.com: I hadn’t expected such a response to my article about choosing the right desktop environment when I was writing it. It was a really quick write-up, a kind of a brainstorming session. Well this time, I tried improving it. More info, more research and more work are contained in this post.

New Features, Games Coming To CrossOver

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: CodeWeavers, the company behind the WINE-based CrossOver Office, had introduced CrossOver Games as a gaming-oriented version of their pay-to-use edition of WINE.

Quad Boot - Friday Update - It's Good!

Filed under
Linux

community.zdnet.co.uk/blog: After nearly a full week of working with this quad-boot setup in various stages of completion, I can say that I am very pleased. It is working well and it is allowing me to easily compare the three different versions of Linux, which is just what I wanted. Here are some notes about each of the versions.

Moving Forward with openSUSE 11.1

Filed under
SUSE

Andreas Jaeger: Since both Coolo and Michl are on vacation for two weeks, I’m a bit more involved with the openSUSE distribution. Besides announcing the openSUSE 11.1 roadmap, I was busy to stabilize the factory trees and get an installable distribution after quite some major changes have been checked into factory. The goal was to have a snapshot of factory as internal Alpha0.

Response to “Lancelot, KDE and Gnome”

Filed under
KDE

fomentgroup.org/blog: Well, this is one of the Aaron-style “explain to the unbelievers why they are wrong”. This is in response to http://blog.kov.eti.br/?p=19. Well, as all trolls on the internet, you have a couple of things obviously not clear to you.

Aspire One: the netbook Eee PC killer from Acer?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

itwire.com: Hot on the heels of the Asus Eee PC comes more small subnotebooks, with Acer giving them the Intel inspired name of the netbook. Does the Intel Atom-powered Aspire One ‘netbook’ fill you with desire to acquire one?

Acer's Linpus Linux Lite (Fedora) ultra portable laptop piles the pressure on Microsoft

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

freesoftwaremagazine.com: First Asus, then Dell, then MSI, Elonex, the Cloud and all their clones. Now Acer has entered the fray and it is all, at least initially, good news. It looks like they’ve all found a bit of Dutch courage and started to turn on the schoolyard bully from Redmond. Of what do I speak? Ultra lightweight portable laptops computers. Running varieties of GNU/Linux.

An Introduction to Linux for Activists

Filed under
Linux

angryveteran.blogspot: So I have said that Linux is one of the keys to creating a truly free flow of information in the computer world. There is not just one kind of Linux. There are thousands of different versions availible. Most versions of Linux are completely free and all versions of Linux are OPEN SOURCE. Different versions are geared towards different uses. So with so many versions availible to you where should you begin?

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more