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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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No penguins in Akihibara

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: Today in Tokyo, I set myself the task of finding Linux in the Akihibara, which advertises itself to the world as Tokyo’s electronic wonderland.

few odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Open Source Network Diagramming..

  • Linux Market Share Passes 2%
  • The Linux Action Show! Season 10 Episode 6
  • Doing the geek thing with Linux
  • Podcast 56 Gentoo Developer Joshua Jackson

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing 64bit Flash Player in Ubuntu Linux

  • Reclaim Linux Disk Space by Reducing Reserved Blocks
  • How to build a highly available file server using OpenSolaris
  • Subclassing a list in Python
  • NetBackup Backup Report Script

OpenSolaris 2009.06: Getting Better All The Time

Filed under
OS

blogs.zdnet.com: The June 2009 (2009.06) release of OpenSolaris provides a solid Open Source GNOME desktop experience like that of a modern Linux distribution combined with the scalability and stability of UNIX.

AbiWord 2.7.3 Released

Filed under
Software

uwog.net: We just released AbiWord 2.7.3. The most visible addition to this release is the return of our Maemo support.

Install it forward

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

practicalswitchtoubuntu.blogspot: I am reminded by the movie "Pay it forward" where a person started doing good to three other persons and the way of gratitude is to pay it forward, doing good to three other persons thus multiplying the goodness around.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #145

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #145 for the week June 1st - June 7th, 2009 is available.

On the menu - Console Apps

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I have mentioned a couple times that I have been running without X for quite a while, on my main system. Here’s what’s running on it.

Fedora teams’ call to action.

Filed under
Linux

marilyn.frields.org: The Fedora Project has always been aimed at encouraging participation. Free/libre and open source software continues its forward momentum and increasing pace through the growth of community and contribution.

Creative Commons, We Have a Problem

opendotdotdot.blogspot: I'm a big fan of the Creative Commons movement. But it has a big problem: few people have heard of it.

FOSS can work in the Free Market

Filed under
OSS

doctormo.wordpress: This is in response to LeafStorm’s excelent post about the market economics of software and FOSS caleed FOSS and the Free Market.

Get your Google Chrome on in Linux

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: Now I have to admit I assumed I would get it installed only to have it seg fault left and right (or worse, not even start up). I, however, was very pleasantly surprised.

Code Talks

Filed under
OSS

stefanoforenza.com: Some days ago I stumbled Why Free Software has poor usability. Disagreeing on about everything written in there, I decided to pull out a long reply to each one of the points made.

Invisible force Destroying the Status Quo

Filed under
Linux

linuxlock.blogspot: I spent a good part of my Sunday calling people that now use Linux. It's good to track how many people are happy with their systems. That's why I simply laughed at the recent story of Linux reaching 1% of the market.

The Perfect Server - CentOS 5.3 x86_64 [ISPConfig 3]

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to prepare a CentOS 5.3 x86_64 server for the installation of ISPConfig 3, and how to install ISPConfig 3.

The Three Best Linux Media Centers

Filed under
Software

berkeleylug.com: The three media centers I list are my favorites. All of them integrate easily with MythTV by adding a simple menu item, and each work greats with remotes and looks good on your TV.

25 Years of Tetris: Time Waster Retrospective

Filed under
Gaming

downloadsquad.com: Today is a historic day. Not only is it the 65th anniversary of D-Day (and my grandfather, a US Naval Captain was there), It is the 25th anniversary of the greatest puzzle game of all time: Tetris.

IMDB 0.3.0 now including console utility

Filed under
Software

ariejan.net: With the release of IMDB 0.3.0, a command-line utility is included! Why is this awesome for you?

odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Tweaks to Boot Ext4 Filesystem Performance

  • Amarok 2 under Ubuntu
  • Install Linux OS to a USB stick or SD card
  • Anyone for an Open Source Donut?
  • Customing Linux Terminals: Fortunes
  • Droid Assault for Linux
  • Crazynoid
  • Probably not what the design team had in mind …
  • openSUSE Wallpaper
  • Study criticises laptops for distracting children in developing countries
  • How to add a sound card to a KVM guest?
  • Speeding up Internet Surfing (Squid + BIND)
  • How to change the icons in Ubuntu
  • New Firefox Icon: Iteration 14 in Context
  • FLOSS Weekly 72: OpenSim

New cool list of Linux must-have programs

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: It's been approximately two years since I've written the first article, A (cool) list of Linux tools. Since, a lot has changed. I have decided to write a new article, from scratch, cataloging an up-to-date collection of must-have programs.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Google's Upspin Debuts

  • Another option for file sharing
    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.
  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files
    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.
  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub
    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share. Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.
  • Google devs try to create new global namespace
    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like? The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

RPi-friendly home automation kit adds voice recognition support

Following its successful Kickstarter campaign for a standalone Matrix home automation and surveillance hub, and subsequent release of an FPGA-driven Matrix Creator daughter board for use with the Raspberry Pi, Matrix Labs today launched a “Matrix Voice” board on Indiegogo. The baseline board, currently available at early-bird pricing of $45, has an array of 7 microphones surrounding a ring of 18 software-controlled RGBW LEDs. A slightly pricier model includes an MCU-controlled WiFi/Bluetooth ESP32 wireless module. Read more

The Year Of Linux On Everything But The Desktop

The War on Linux goes back to Bill Gates, then CEO of Microsoft, in an “open letter to hobbyists” published in a newsletter in 1976. Even though Linux wouldn’t be born until 1991, Gates’ burgeoning software company – itself years away from releasing its first operating system – already felt the threat of open source software. We know Gates today as a kindly billionaire who’s joining us in the fight against everything from disease to income inequality, but there was a time when Gates was the bad guy of the computing world. Microsoft released its Windows operating system in 1985. At the time, its main competition was Apple and Unix-like systems. BSD was the dominant open source Unix clone then – it marks its 40th birthday this year, in fact – and Microsoft fired barrages of legal challenges to BSD just like it eventually would against Linux. Meanwhile Apple sued Microsoft over its interface, in the infamous “Look and Feel” lawsuit, and Microsoft’s reign would forever be challenged. Eventually Microsoft would be tried in both the US and the UK for antitrust, which is a government regulation against corporate monopolies. Even though it lost both suits, Microsoft simply paid the fine out of its bottomless pockets and kept right at it. Read more