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Friday, 24 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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PCLinuxOS 2010.1 KDE4

Filed under
PCLOS

wamukota.blogspot: It's been a few weeks now that PCLinuxOS 2010.1 has been available. I have it installed on my 'old' laptop - a HP Compaq nx6325 - and this is my experience up to now.

Overview and Explanation of Linux Desktop Environments

Filed under
KDE
Software

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Something most new Linux users often struggle to understand when first using Linux is the concept of desktop environments. What a desktop environment actually is I feel gets further clouded when users start exploring different "spins" of a distro.

Enermax's New, Colorful, And Shiny Case Fans

Filed under
Hardware

tomshardware.com: Here are details on four fan models the Taiwanese component manufacturer plans to release by the end of the year, all carrying the "Vegas" moniker to highlight the line's flashy LED-driven styling.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 126

Filed under
SUSE

Midori Web Browser

Filed under
Software

beginlinux.com: Your preferences while browsing the web depend largely upon what tasks you perform while using the browser. If speed is a concern, give the lightweight Midori web browser a try.

Cradle to Grave – A Look at Arch Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxforu.com: I have upgraded my systems around 30 times with new versions. In the office, I use Ubuntu, and I also keep abreast of SUSE and Mandriva. However, all these distributions have one feature in common— they get updated twice a year, with a lot of excitement and curiosity generated around each new version.

Fedora 13 review

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Fedora 13 is the latest update to the Redhat-sponsored, RPM-based Linux distribution. It has long held a reputation of being a testbed for features that will eventually make it into Redhat Enterprise Linux, and, therefore, less stable than other desktop-oriented distributions.

A look at Slackware 13.0

Filed under
Slack

technologytales.com: I recall a fellow university student using it in the mid/late 1990′s. Since then, my exploration took me into Redhat, SuSE, Mandrake and eventually to Ubuntu, Debian and Fedora. All of that bypassed Slackware so it was to give the thing a look.

How ready is your browser for HTML5- Take the test

Filed under
Web

ghabuntu.com: HTML5 is the second most buzzed word around I think, second only to the Hypepad. In case you're wondering whether your current browser is compatible with it or not, a simple tool to help you determine this is the HTML5 test tool.

10 Fresh and Awesome Icon Sets for GNOME

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: Because it has been a while since I made an entry about icons, I decided to gather some new icons sets that you may have never seen before. Let me share with you this new collection of fresh and awesome icon sets for Ubuntu/GNOME.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • OOo: 154 million and counting...
  • The Blue screen of Death Screensavers
  • TransferSummit - The practical magic of open source
  • Red Hat CEO Whitehurst Blasts Software Patents
  • Trading Alert for Red Hat Inc.
  • Weekly Kernel review with openSUSE Flavor
  • When software updates go bad(ly)
  • Virtualisation and Open Source
  • CinePaint for painting and retouching bitmap frames
  • Maverick to ship with transparent theme?
  • Back to Karmic
  • Cut the fat with Linux
  • When you should open-source your internal apps
  • Interview with Stephen Kelly (KDE PIM)
  • How do you make money with open source?
  • Windows for Linux
  • FLOSS Weekly 122: Mercurial

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Create A Postcard in GIMP
  • Live Magic- Create a live cd/DVD for your installed Ubuntu / Debian
  • How to Recording Internal Audio in Ubuntu
  • How to fix Command Not Found error
  • Multimedia (MP3, MPEG-4, AVI, DiVX, etc.) support in Fedora 13
  • Create a smart PDF document with Scribus
  • Lzma Vs Bzip2 – Better Compression than bzip2
  • Using System Testing in Ubuntu

MSI 890GXM-G65

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: About a month ago we reviewed the AMD Athlon II X3 425 processor when coupled with an AMD 890GX + SB850 motherboard and in this review we are taking a closer look at that motherboard under Linux. The motherboard in question is the MSI 890GXM-G65 with USB 3.0 and Serial ATA 6Gb/s support.

Fluffy Linux - ponies, bunnies, and pink

Filed under
Linux

apachelog.wordpress: A Linux distribution made out of fluff, bunnies, unicorns and awesome. It all started out with Parley. We justed wanted to test the amazing theming capabilities in the upcoming 4.5 release of Parley, and eventually we ended up doing a whole distribution.

Google resolves WebM licensing conflict with BSD license

arstechnica.com: Google is adopting the BSD license for WebM in order to address a licensing conflict. When Google opened up the VP8 codec and announced the launch of the WebM project during the Google I/O conference last month, the actual license under which the code was distributed was not an official open source software license.

10 useful Firefox-based apps

Filed under
Software

infoworld.com: Mozilla's underlying Web browser technology also runs some interesting non-browser applications

Linux wins court case agains Microsoft

mybroadband.co.za: A Quebec court ruled a provincial agency was wrong to install Microsoft software on its computers without allowing others, such as Linux dealers, to bid on the lucrative contract.

Passionate about ... Operating Systems

on-being-open.blogspot.com: I have never been able to figure it all out. The Windows mavens that call Apple people names and insult their intelligence (and the reverse).

intellectual honesty and html5

0xdeadbeef.com: OK, this is the post that contains everything that everyone on the inside of the browser market knows, but doesn’t say out loud. It’s time for someone to expose the emperor.

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Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link. iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support. Read more Also: GameShell Is An Open Source And Linux-powered Retro Game Console That You’ll Love

Games: SuperTuxKart, Tannenberg, Observer