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Monday, 23 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • New Download Manager for Linux
  • CrossOver 9.0 Linux Review A finely packaged Wine
  • German appeal court upholds Microsoft FAT patent
  • FreeBSD/CLANG compiler ready for testing
  • Kernel Review with openSUSE Flavor (Week 16)
  • Kaudiocreator Returns in KDE4
  • VLC media player version 1.0.6 release
  • What scares people away from Linux
  • Fedora elections coming up
  • Valve Updates Its Unreleased Steam Linux Client
  • IPv4's Last Day: What Will Happen When There Is Only IPv6?
  • BSDTalk interview with Dru Lavigne
  • VMware’s Database Play: Will Red Hat Follow?
  • A Walk On The Stupid Side: How Does The Other Half Live?
  • Appliances and Linux
  • Linux Outlaws 147 - Where's the 'kin Phone?

The future of open source

Filed under
OSS
  • The future of open source is in the middle
  • Cenatic: 'Using open source is key for e-government'
  • EU: open standards and interoperable systems for e-government
  • How the UK government can follow Obama's open source revolution
  • Using version control to manage Intellectual Property

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • 7zip File: How to Uncompress 7z files
  • Bash: Handling Command Not Found
  • Encrypt your files quick n’ dirty
  • How to Install Vuze 4.4.0 on Ubuntu
  • Check your unread messages in Gmail, from terminal

Linux System Information Decoded

Filed under
Linux

linux-mag.com: System Administrator Dilemma #942: Send a Data Center Service Tech out to pop open the case to tell you what’s in your system or use two simple commands.

The worst thing Oracle can do

Filed under
Software
  • The worst thing Oracle can do to open source is not care
  • Will Oracle Leave Open Source Customers High And Dry?

Free/Open Source Software Global Maturity Matrix (FOSS GloMM)

Filed under
OSS

jamesdixon.wordpress: I have stated a few times that the Free Software Foundation (FSF) and its advocates don’t have a vision of the future that I find viable. Twenty years from now, across the globe, every individual, business, organization, and government entity will have FOSS suitable for all their needs.

How to switch your small or home office to Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software

wine-reviews.net: With Linux and free software making a name for itself in the world of big business, many people are testing the feasibility of switching small and home office software to their open source equivalents.

Linux NetworkManager a Solid Tool with New Features

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Applications like Firefox and OpenOffice.org get all the glory. They're highly visible as cornerstone applications of the free desktop. But what about the background apps that do the grunt work and sit silently in the background, ignored unless we run into a bug?

Ubuntu wants Adobe, even if Apple doesn't

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu wants Adobe, even if Apple doesn't
  • Comparison: Ubuntu update manager and 2clickUpdate
  • Frugal Tech Show: Matt Zimmerman, CTO of Canonical
  • Four tools for graphics applications in Ubuntu
  • Trying to switch to Empathy
  • Xubuntu Lucid - Sweet awesomeness!
  • Ubuntu Discards System Tray
  • Nautilius-Elementary 2.30 for Ubuntu Will Wow You

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.34 (Part 2) - File Systems

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Version 2.6.34 of the Linux kernel will be the first to support the Ceph and LogFS file systems. A number of changes to the Btrfs and XFS code promise improved performance. The kernel should now be better at working with drives with 4 KB logical sectors.

Open Source Communities: Canonical, Ubuntu and Jono Bacon

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

robertogaloppini.net: Recently MuleSource partnered with Canonical to improve Tomcat packaging for Ubuntu and Debian. To learn more about Ubuntu I managed to pose few questions to Jono, Ubuntu’s community manager and author of “The Art of Community”.

A Linux Client at Work

Filed under
Linux

elevenislouder.blogspot: I am in the computer repair business. Normally, people come in with either PCs or Macs, and request repairs that are really rather simple. Occasionally, I'm called on to do large installations, or set up servers, but that's rare. What's even more rare is having a Linux client.

Linux Distro Review: PCLinuxOS 2010

Filed under
PCLOS

damienkane.blogspot: People who don't know Linux may shiver when they hear the word 'Linux'. Command line! Difficult! Not for me, thanks. But it isn't like that.

Upcoming Artwork for Linux Mint 9

Filed under
Linux

news.softpedia.com: Clement Lefebvre proudly announced two days ago (April 21st) the plans for the artwork of the upcoming Linux Mint 9 operating system.

Become a lord of the diamond with NetStats Baseball

Filed under
Gaming

sourceforge.net/blog: You may never get to manage in the major leagues, but with NetStats Baseball, you can get an idea of what it’s like. NetStats is a simulation of Major League Baseball that uses statistics as input to gameplay.

PCLinuxOS 2010 Review

Filed under
PCLOS

cristalinux.blogspot: In the last couple of years I have tested many Linux distros. PCLinuxOS was one of the few popular ones I had not tested. Being based off Mandriva, I was assuming it would be similar to the Linux Mint - Ubuntu case. boy, was I wrong!

Something old, something new: Console file managers

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I should know better than to mention console programs any more, because as soon as I do, someone tosses out another one and I have to try it. Such was the case with ranger.

Add some cool extensions to Banshee

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: Rhythmbox isn’t the only player in town. Oh no. In fact, another outstanding player gets plenty o’ lovin’ from the Ubuntu community. That player? Banshee. And, like Rhythbox, Banshee has some really cool extensions.

Planet Saving Software for Linux now released

Filed under
Software

theopensourcerer.com: This morning I had an email telling me they’ve completed their testing and have now hit final release. They’ve also changed the name of the software from Micromiser to Granola.

Ubuntu, the family album

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.nizarus.org: A few days before the release of the new Ubuntu, here’s a guided tour through the Ubuntu family album with some annotations telling my story with the different versions.

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