Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Xubuntu 13.10 - Same again please bartender Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 10:11pm
Story I have no intention of ending my relationships with Linux Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 10:09pm
Story Ubuntu Linux WiFi Security: Canonical Combats Criticism Rianne Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 9:54pm
Story Linux 3.13-rc6 Rianne Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 9:34pm
Story Now you can run LibreOffice in a browser Rianne Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 9:22pm
Story 2013: A Linux Christmas Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 9:00pm
Story 10 disappointments for open source in 2013 Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 8:58pm
Story 'PC Plus' Machines Being Prepped For CES To Run Android On Windows In Retaliation Against MSFT Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2013 - 6:07pm
Story NSA reportedly intercepting laptops purchased online to install spy malware Rianne Schestowitz 29/12/2013 - 10:26pm
Story GNU Hurd Is Up To 344k Lines Of Code Rianne Schestowitz 29/12/2013 - 9:20pm

Corsair DHX 4GB DDR2-800MHz

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: It's been a while since last looking at any Corsair memory at Phoronix, but up for review this afternoon is their latest TWIN2X4096-6400C4DHX memory. This DDR2 memory features Corsair's DHX technology for cooling the memory ICs with EPP latencies of 4-4-4-12 and run at 800MHz. Like many other Corsair products, the TWIN2X4096-6400C4DHX is also backed by a lifetime warranty.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 40

Filed under
SUSE

news.opensuse.org: Issue #40 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: openSUSE 11.1 Beta 1 Now Available, Serious e1000e Driver Issue, and openSUSE Homepage Redesigned.

2008 New Zealand Open Source Awards

Filed under
OSS

radar.oreilly.com: Wednesday night in Wellington is a lot more exciting when the New Zealand Open Source Award ceremony is on! We gave out prizes for best project, contributor, use in government, use in business, use in education, use in community organization, and use for infrastructure, as well as two special awards.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • 30 Cool Acer Aspire One Hacks

  • Bypassing automatic updates Debian-based distros
  • Firewall with QoS for home setup
  • Ask Linux.com: Mobile broadband, partitioning thumbs
  • Using SnortSP and Snort 2.8.2
  • 5 ways to make using bash more productive
  • Read Firefox cookie file
  • How to compile The Fabulous Logic Analyzer on Gentoo Linux
  • My home network
  • How To Use UUID To Mount Partitions Under Ubuntu Linux

Grafting American attitudes on European open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet: Big Money Matt Asay is fairly dismissive of European open source. It lacks the killer instinct, he writes. The only way to graft that on is to bring the European to America.

Also: European open-source guidelines spark debate

Linux for Older PCs : From Ubuntu to Vector Linux

Filed under
Linux

anojrs.blogspot: Finally after 2 long years, this week, I decided to move on a bit, and try something new. My PC is getting older and constantly struggles to carry the huge processing needs for the latest KDE4 or Gnome. This week, I tried Vector Linux.

The GNU Cake

Filed under
OSS

reeteshification.blogspot: Today is GNU's 25th Birthday and the FSF Student Chapter at GRIET, my college celebrated the event with great enthusiasm. The main part was the cake Cutting at the end where all us FSF members and Staff of CSE Department ate a GNU!..... Cake.

Mandriva 2009/KDE 4.1 Revisited

Filed under
Linux

As Mandriva prepares for its 2009 release, I've been updating Mandriva 2009 daily from their "cooker" (development) repository ever since I installed a beta version a few weeks ago. Last night's update was massive, with an update of over 350 packages.

First Impressions: Pardus 2008.1 KDE4 Edition

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: ALMOST a year has passed since I first reviewed Pardus. As my previous review shows, I was mightily impressed with Pardus, so I was delighted to see a recent appearance in the Distrowatch release listings for the latest version, 2008.1.

100+ Beautiful Free Fonts for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.com: If you are a graphic and web designer, the default fonts that came with Ubuntu will surely be not enough for your needs. However, if you know where to look, you can find plenty of additional fonts that can help get the job done. I'll show you.

Ubuntu Forums Promotes Silence; Thumb Sucking

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

davestechsupport.com/blog: For those of you out there who use Ubuntu Linux (or any Linux distro for that matter), recent events on the Ubuntu Forums might intrigue you. Recently, a new policy has been enacted by the moderators, which prevents people from posting new threads in “The Backyard”.

Paul Newman dies at 83

Filed under
Obits

guardian.co.uk: The screen legend Paul Newman has died at the age of 83 after losing a long battle against cancer. Newman died yesterday at his farmhouse near Westport.

Mandriva Linux 2009 Release Candidate 2 (Gnome)

Filed under
MDV

headshotgamer.com: I've previously reviewed Mandriva 2009 Beta 1 using KDE 4 as the window manager. I didn't like what I saw. This time, it's the Gnome window manager and this is the last development release before the final version hit the download mirrors on the 9th of October 2008. Hopefully they've got everything right.

Atheros HAL Under Free Software License

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Last year the MadWiFi project abandoned their proprietary HAL in favor of using OpenHAL. This week Atheros Communications has made another step forward in enabling their wireless products on Linux. Atheros has released their HAL used for their 802.11a/b/g devices under the ISC.

Want to try GNOME 2.24?

Filed under
Software

bani.com.br: Thanks to Ken VanDine, you can try the fresh new GNOME in an easy and painless way: through a virtual machine!

Understanding Moore's Law

Filed under
Sci/Tech

arstechnica.com: In April of 1965, Electronics magazine published an article by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore. The article and the predictions that it made have since become the stuff of legend, and like most legends it has gone through a number of changes in the telling and retelling.

I keep coming back to Gentoo!

Filed under
Gentoo

rahulthewall.wordpress: I don’t know why, but somehow after using Gentoo it is impossible for me to use any other Linux Distro. I wanted to try KDE-4.1.1 quickly and I burned Kubuntu Ibex Alpha 6. I could only tolerate it for 45 minutes.

Ubuntu 7.04 reaches end-of-life on October 19, 2008

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxcompatible.org: Ubuntu announced the release of 7.04 almost 18 months ago, on April 19, 2007. As with the earlier releases, Ubuntu committed to ongoing security and critical fixes for a period of 18 months. The support period is now nearing its end and Ubuntu 7.04 will reach end of life on Sunday, October 19th.

PCLinuxOS Repositories

Filed under
PCLOS

linux-blog.org: To equip the standard PCLinuxOS user with how to change repos, we first need to understand how the repository is structured, how the developers use the repositories, and how the community should make use of repositories.

Even When Linux Fans Win, They Lose

Filed under
Linux

pcmech.com: Linux fans have been arguing - very loudly - for years that we should all be using Linux. There are quite a few *nix fans that say if you use Ubuntu, it’s a “for noobs only” OS. It is this attitude that pisses me off about the Linux community as a whole.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Conferences and Kids

I've taken my daughter, now 13, to FOSDEM in Brussels every year that I had slots there. She isn't a geek, yet enjoys the crowds and the freebies. When I could, I also took my kids to other events, where I was speaking. In this post I'd like to capture my feelings about why children should be part of conferences, and what conferences can do to make this easier. First off, the "why?" Traditional conferences (in all domains, not just software) are boring, ritualized events where the participants compete to see who can send the most people to sleep at once. The real event starts later, over alcohol. It is a strictly adult affair, and what happens at the conf stays at the conf. Now our business is a little different. It is far more participative. Despite our history of finicky magic technologies that seem to attract mainly male brains, we strive for diversity, openness, broad tolerance. Most of what we learn and teach comes through informal channels. Finished is formal education, elitism, and formal credentials. We are smashing the barriers of distance, wealth, background, gender, and age. Read more

50 Essential Linux Applications

If you’re a refugee from Windows, you may be finding the Linux world slightly confusing, wondering how you can get the all same functionality you had in Windows, but still enjoy the freedom that Linux offers. Never fear! Linux is not some scary, difficult to use monster that’s only used by hackers and programmers, it’s actually becoming more and more user friendly every day. Read
more

today's leftovers

  • Debugging gnome-session problems on Ubuntu 14.04
  • Introducing snapd-glib
  • An awesome experience!
    GUADEC has been a week full of memorable moments. As my friend Rares mentioned in his post, our newcomers group was welcomed by friendly community members right as we arrived at the hotel. For someone who has never attended a similar event before, this really helped with getting into the conference atmosphere. In the first couple days of the conference, I found myself meeting a lot of people that I knew from IRC. It felt really nice to finally know the person behind the internet nick. I was especially excited about getting to meet my mentor, Carlos Soriano =). In between the presentations I also took the time to prepare my own lightning talk about compressed files in Nautilus. Speaking in front of the GNOME community for the first time was a unique experience.
  • Commvault Announces Support of Red Hat Virtualization 4 with Commvault Software
  • Modularity Infrastructure Design
    The purpose of our Modularity initiative is to support the building, maintaining, and shipping of modular things. So, in order to ensure these three requirements are met, we need to design a framework for building and composing the distribution. In terms of the framework, in general, we are concerned about the possibility of creating an exponential number of component combinations with independent lifecycles. That is, when the number of component combinations becomes too large, we will not be able to manage them. So that we don’t accidentally make our lives worse, we must limit the number of supported modules with a policy and provide infrastructure automation to reduce the amount of manual work required.
  • more, less, and a story of typical Unix fossilization
    In the beginning, by which we mean V7, Unix didn't have a pager at all. That was okay; Unix wasn't very visual in those days, partly because it was still sort of the era of the hard copy terminal. Then along came Berkeley and BSD. People at Berkeley were into CRT terminals, and so BSD Unix gave us things like vi and the first pager program, more (which showed up quite early, in 3BSD, although this isn't as early as vi, which appears in 2BSD). Calling a pager more is a little bit odd but it's a Unix type of name and from the beginning more prompted you with '--More--' at the bottom of the screen. All of the Unix vendors that based their work on BSD Unix (like Sun and DEC) naturally shipped versions of more along with the rest of the BSD programs, and so more spread around the BSD side of things. However, more was by no means the best pager ever; as you might expect, it was actually a bit primitive and lacking in features. So fairly early on Mark Nudelman wrote a pager with somewhat more features and it wound up being called less as somewhat of a joke. When less was distributed via Usenet's net.sources in 1985 it became immediately popular, as everyone could see that it was clearly nicer than more, and pretty soon it was reasonably ubiquitous on Unix machines (or at least ones that had some degree of access to stuff from Usenet). In 4.3 BSD, more itself picked up the 'page backwards' feature that had motived Mark Nudelman to write less, cf the 4.3BSD manpage, but this wasn't the only attraction of less. And this is where we get into Unix fossilization.
  • PNScan Linux Trojan Resurfaces with New Attacks Targeting Routers in India
    A trojan thought to have died out resurfaced with new attacks and a new and improved version, launching new attacks on routers running Linux-based firmware located in India's cyber-space.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • 4 tips for teaching kids how to build electronics
    Kids are naturally curious about how things work, and with a new trend in hardware companies creating open source hardware products, it's a great time to teach kids about electronics. But modern technology can seem too complex to even begin to understand. So where do you start?
  • Oil companies joining open source world by sharing data [Ed: No, oil companies, sharing data is open data and not open source. More openwashing, like greenwashing]
    The oil and gas industry has long collected huge volumes of data, but it hasn’t always known quite what to do with it all. Often, the terabytes aren’t even stored on computer systems that readily talk to each other. Industry insiders are used to it, said Michael Jones, senior director of strategy at the oil and gas software maker Landmark. But it’s not OK, he said. So, about a year ago, Jones and some of his oil industry colleagues set about to fix it. This week, at Landmark’s Innovation Forum & Expo at the Westin hotel in northwest Houston, the company unveiled the beginnings of a collaborative its members called groundbreaking. In a move to drive technology further, faster — and, perhaps, take a bigger piece of the burgeoning big-data market — Landmark is pushing its main computing platform into the cloud, for all to use.
  • Interactive, open source visualizations of nocturnal bird migrations in near real-time
    New flow visualizations using data from weather radar networks depict nocturnal bird migrations, according to a study published August 24, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Judy Shamoun-Baranes from University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and colleagues.
  • Go! Speed Racer Go!
    I finally reached a point where I could start running the go version of sm-photo-tool. I finished the option validation for the list command. While I was testing it I noticed how much faster the Go version felt. Here are the python vs Go versions of the commands.
  • Semantic Interoperability for European Public Services will be presented at the SEMANTiCS 2016 conference
    The revision of the European Interoperability Framework and the importance of data and information standardisation for promoting semantic interoperability for European Public Services will be presented by Dr. Vassilios Peristeras, DG Informatics, ISA unit at the SEMANTiCS 2016 conference which takes place in Leipzig on September 13th and 14th 2016. The title of the presentation is “Promoting Semantic Interoperability for European Public Services: the European Commission ISA2 Programme” (slideset to appear here soon).